Tuesday, August 30, 2011

WILLIAM BRACKETT 1520-1575

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of Hannah Polina Child (Elmer), daughter of Polly Barber (Child), daughter of Ichabod Barber, son of Mary Barney (Barber), daugther of Israel Barney, son of Elizabeth Brackett (Barney), daughter of Josiah Brackett, son of Roland Brackett, son of Peter Brackett, son of Richard Brackett, son of William Brackett.]
St. Gregory Church, Sudbury, Suffolk, England
William might have been a member of the St. Gregory parish (one of three parishes) in Sudbury. He requested to be buried in this churchyard. More information and pictures of this grand church can be found at www.suffolkchurches.co.uk/sudburystg.html
However, several family trees suggest he was actually buried at St. Peter's (another parish in Sudbury). See St. Peter's photo. William's great grandson was christened here in 1610.


St. Peter, Sudbury, Suffolk, England


So where was William Brackett buried? Was it here, as many family trees suggest? Or in the churchyard of St. Gregory's, as William had requested in his will? (See photo of St. Gregory's.) For more information and pictures of this beautiful old structure, see www.suffolkchurches.co.uk/sudburystg.html


Last Will and Testament of
William Brackett
"4 May 1575...The will of William Brackett of Sudbury, Suffolck, Butcher, being at this time in perfect memory...my body to be buried in the churchyard of St. Gregoryes...all my houses with the appurtenances in Sudbury which I have shall be sold by Richard Brackett my son and Peter Hallwell of Little Cornard within two years next and immediately ensuing my decease to the most advantage...the money to be disburst in manner and form following...


to Alyce Brackett my wife 40 pounds presently after sale is made. In consideration of it she shall keep William Brackett and Maud Brackett my children and if she die or sale be made, then I will give the same 40 pounds to William Brackett my son and Maud Brackett my daughter to be equally divided between them...


to Edmund Brackett my son 30 pounds to be paid after my houses be sold...if he die, to his children at 21...


to Maud Brackett my daughter 10 pounds which Alyce my wife is to receive and give bond to my executor to pay to Maud at age 18, but if Maud die before 18, the 10 pounds to go to William Brackett my son...


to Richard Brackett my son the residue of the proceeds of the sale...if the said Richard be able to bind the said houses, then I will that he should have the p'forment thereof giving for the same as another man will. Alyce my wife to have the occupation of all my said houses rent free until they be sold...


to George Brackett my brother my mase tipped with silver and all my apparell...


to William Brackett my son and to his heirs my staule in the m'kytte..


to Alyce my wife to recevie the profit thereof until he reaches 21 but if he dies before 21 then the same staule to Maud my daughter...


to Alyce my wife all the movable goods within the houses, one cow and all the swine, except one feather bed and one bolster which lyeth on the bed next to the entry which I do give unto Richard my son...


to Richard Brackett my son all my leases of all those grounds, lands and meadows which I now hold and occupy...all my corn now growing and all my goods, chattles and movables unbequeathed.


Richard to be my executor, Thomas Smyth to be overseer.
Witnesses: Lawrence Newman; Clarke, George Brackett, William Curd, Nicholas Ruggell, John Brackett and Thomas Smythe" with others.
Proved 5 July 1575.


Source: Eight Hundred Years Of The History Of The Name Of BRACKETT The Keepers of the Hounds, by William Brackett 1999-2008, brackettwilliam@yahoo.com

found on ancestry.com


Brackett occupations and Will of Edward
March 1540, Sudbury, Suffolk, England


The following information was obtained from Rootsweb.com (Ada Bickford Ancestry). She suggests that Edward is the brother of William. We have included his will in this record. However, we can find no record to prove Edward was William's brother. It is interesting to note that Edward also asked to be buried at St. Gregory's, just as William had requested. Also of interest, Edward (who was married to Maud) died in 1540, the same year as William's father (William who was also married to a Maud.) Could this Edward possibly have been William's father instead of brother???

William was a butcher and had a shop (or stall as it was called) in Sudbury. He left it to his son, William.


Abbrev: Fifty Great Migration Colonists to New England

Title: Fifty Great Migration Colonists to New England and Their Origins

Author: John Brooks Threlfall

Publication: Madison, Wisconsin 1990

Page: Page 87

William Brackett and Edward Brackett, probably his brother are mentioned in the Military Survey of Sudbury in 1522. William was listed as an able archer and Edward was listed as an able billman. No earlier record of the Brackett name is found in Sudbury.


Both are listed as butchers. One can reasonably assume that they grew up in the trade and learned it from their father who also must have lived in Sudbury. Two years later they both appear again on record as taxpayers in the 1524 Subsidy Return, each down for 4 pence on wages of 20 shillings.


Edward Brackett's will reads:


20 June 1540 The will of Edward Brackett, balie of the town of sudbury, Suffolk, hale of mind and in good and perfect remembrance ...


my body to be buried within the churchyard of St. Gregory in Sudbury ...


to every of my children John, James, Edward, George and faythe 5 marks at age 20 and if Faythe marry before age 20, then on day of marriage ...


to Maud my wife all those my copyhold lease, interest and term of years which I have and hold of the right worshipful Lady Dame Jane Corbett of an in certain lands and pastures lying in Assington, Suffolk, called by the name Perefield ...


Richard Barker of Sudbury to hold and occupy these leases during the nonage of son George Brackett, paying (pounds) 4 13 (shillings) 7 (pence) sterling yearly to Maud my wife and 6 c of fresh wood with the felling making and carrying of the same toward the keeping and bringing up of the same George and Edward my sons ...


Also, to wife Maud a certain lease in lands called Chyllton wente and Ducksdale ...


The resdue of all my goods and cattle, money, plate, debts and implements of household not assigned or bequeathed to Maud my wife whom I make sole executrix.


John Oxburghe of Sudbury, gentleman, and the said Richard Barker to be aydors and comforters to my said wife and for their pains 6 (shillings) 8 (pence) sterling.


Witnesses: John Bannasted, Raulff Feosdike, John Blanche, John Beele, Robert Cooke, Will(iam) Hayward. Proved 19 March 1540/41
found on ancestry.com

RICHARD BRACKETT 1550-1626

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of Hannah Polina Child (Elmer), daughter of Polly Barber (Child), daughter of Ichabod Barber, son of Mary Barney (Barber), daugther of Israel Barney, son of Elizabeth Brackett (Barney), daughter of Josiah Brackett, son of Roland Brackett, son of Peter Brackett, son of Richard Brackett.]
Richard Capt Brackett grave marker Norfolk County




All Saints, Sudbury, Suffolk, England
Richard Brackett and Alice Harper were married in this church on 25 September 1579. This structure is nearly all made of cement. The photo shows the south side with a door no longer in use. It is well worth the time to read more information and see the pictures at http://www.suffolkchurches.com/



Richard Capt Brackett 1540-1626

RACHELL (BRACKETT) (SAUNDERS) 1590-1651

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of Hannah Polina Child (Elmer), daughter of Polly Barber (Child), daughter of Ichabod Barber, son of Mary Barney (Barber), daugther of Israel Barney, son of Elizabeth Brackett (Barney), daughter of Josiah Brackett, son of Roland Brackett, son of Rachell (Brackett).]

Birth: unknown
Death: September 15, 1651, Braintree, Norfolk County, Massachusetts, USA

Martin Saunders married (1) by 1619 Rachel (_____) Brackett, widow of Peter Brackett. She died at Braintree on 15 September 1651.

They had 7 children: Mary Eliot, Martin, Leah Wheatley Parmenter, Judith, John, Martin again, and Daniel.

Rachel (_____) (Brackett) Saunders, first wife of Martin Saunders, was mother of Richard Brackett (1632, Boston), of Peter Brackett (1639, Braintree) and of Rachel (Brackett) Newcomb, wife of Francis Newcomb (1635, Boston

Rachel died September 15, 1651 at Braintee, Massachusetts.
Source: Anderson's Great migration Study project.
Find A Grave contributor treerpgmo adds
Rachel Brackett-Sanders maiden name and origin is not known. The earliest definite record of her is that of the baptism of her son Richard Brackett by her first husband Peter Brackett on 16d 9m 1610 at Saint Gregory's Church, Sudbury, Suffolkshire, England. She had three other children with Peter: Peter Jr. (no baptismal record), Rachel (baptized 1614), and Jonathan (baptized 1616). The inventory of her husband Peter Brackett's estate was taken 25d 8m 1616 in All Saints Par, Subury, Suffolkshire, England. Sometime between then and before 1619 she married second to Martin Sanders and they had seven children baptised in All Saints Parish from 1619-1632. Their last child, son Daniel Sanders was buried there 1d 8m 1634 and soon after Martin and Rachel Sanders emigrated to Braintree, Norfolk County, Massachusetts where both of them died. Through both her Brackett and Sanders descendants, Rachel can be considered a "Grandmother" of Braintree as by 1800 a large portion of Braintree citizens were descended from her.
Burial:Unknown
Find A Grave Memorial# 37232942
found on findagrave.com

Rachel
Rachel emigrated in 1635.(266) (30) Rachel came with her second husband Martin Sanders 5 children and 4 servants aboard the ship Planter which left London in mid-April 1635 and arrived in Massachusetts Bay. She Slave or indentured servant owner When Peter Brackett's wife married second Martin Saunders, they emigrated with four servants in 1635 in Massachusetts.(30) According to the Winthrop Society's ships home page, Rachel came with her second husband Martin Saunders. There are four "servant" listed. I think three is more likely. Martin Saunder (age 4) seems an unlikely servant. Especially since the same sources also list a Martin Saunder age 4 as a child of Martin and Rachel. The other servants were Richard Smith (age 14), Richard Ridley (age 16) and Mary Fuller (age 17). I assume that these servants were indentured probably though their 21st year.

She married to Peter Brackett about 1609. I simply assumed they were married one year before the birth of Richard, the only child for whom I have a birth/baptism date. Children were: Captain Richard Brackett, Peter Brackett, Anthony Brackett, William Brackett.

She married to Martin Sanders about 1618 in England. Children were: Mary Sanders, Lea Sanders, Judith Sanders, Martin Sanders.

Robert Charles Anderson. The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Vol. I (A-F). Boston, Massachusetts: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1995. Page 206. 267. Ibid. Page 205. 268. Ibid. Page 206.

30. The Winthrop Society. The Winthrop Scociety Homepage. Most of my citations come from the passenger list pages (both the pre and post-1633 pages), but also an article entitled "Pre-1633 Planters of the Massachusetts Bay Colony.". http://www.winthropsociety.org/home.htm.
found on ancestry.com

PETER BRACKETT 1580-1616

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of Hannah Polina Child (Elmer), daughter of Polly Barber (Child), daughter of Ichabod Barber, son of Mary Barney (Barber), daugther of Israel Barney, son of Elizabeth Brackett (Barney), daughter of Josiah Brackett, son of Roland Brackett, son of Peter Brackett.]
Photo of All Saints Church in Sudbury from httpcommons.wikimedia.orgwikiFileSudbury_-_Church_of_All_Saints.jpg This image was taken from the Geograph project collection. See this photograph's page on the Geograph website for the photographer's contact details. The copyright on this image is owned by Oxyman and is licensed for reuse under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 license.


Birth: 1585
Death: August 25, 1616, Sudbury, Suffolk, England



Son of Richard Brackett of Long Melford, County Suffolk.



First husband of Rachel ____, who subsequently married Martin Saunders and emigrated with him to New England.



Children: Peter Brackett Jr, Richard Brackett, Rachel Brackett Newcomb, and Jonathan Brackett.



Peter made his will on 18 August 1616 and died a week later and was buried on 25 August 1616. He was buried at All Saints, Sudbury, County Suffolk, England. The death date used is his burial date.



Peter Bracket will 1616:



"In the name of God amen in the year of our Lorde one thousand six hundred and sixtene, the of 8th day of August in the 14th year of the reign of his sovereign lorde Kinge James by the grace of god King of England, Scotland, France and Ireland defender of the faith viz of England the ffourteneth and of Scotland the ffiftyeth. I Peter Bracket of Sudburye in the countie of Suff and diocese of Norwich being sicke in bodie but whole in mynde being of perfect rememberance thanks be unto allmightie god doe ordaine and make this my testament and last will in maner and forme following. First I bequeath my soul to allmightie god trusting through his mercies in Christ Jesus to obtaine pardon and forgiveness of my synnse, my body to be buried in christian burial Item I will and my mynd is that Rachell my wiffe shall have all my goods, chattells and implements of householde in consideration that she shall bring up my children and pay unto every one of my children twentye shillings apeece as namelye Peter, Richard and Rachell and my will is that the childe wch my wiffe is wth childe wth shall have twenty shillings to be paid unto them at their severall ages of twenty and one years and if any of them doe dye before their portion to be divided among them that shalbe living Item I will and my mynde is that my Father Richard Bracket shall have the rents of my house in the parish of St. Peters in Sudburye wherein one Martyn London now dwelleth during his naturall liffe and after his decease I will and my minde is that my said house shalbe sold by my wiffe and the money thereof to be devided amonge my children that shalbe then liveing and my will is that my eldest sonne Peter Brackett shall have five pounds more than the residue. Item I ordaine and make Rachell my loving wiffe to be executrix of this my last will and testament.Peter Bracket



Sealed and delivered … will and testament in the presence of Rychard Bracket ... Ruggle William Strutt


Edward Strachie Thomas Grigges"



Proved 28 August 1616.



This will was transcribed by me, William Brackett, from a copy of the original in August of 2010.



Burial: All Saints Churchyard, Sudbury, Suffolk, England
Find A Grave Memorial# 54234701

found on findagrave.com



ST. Peter's Church, Sudbury, Suffolk, England,
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Bluffs/2806/stpeter.jpg
from ANCESTORS OF WINSLOW FARR SR. AND OLIVE HOVEY FREEMAN sketch signed by Peter Brackett?

Short Life/will
1616
Fifty Great Migration Colonists to New England
Title: Fifty Great Migration Colonists to New England & Their Origins
Author: John Brooks Threlfall
Publication: Madison, Wisconsin 1990
Page: Page 80

Peter had a short life. He evidently became ill and made his will 18 August 1616. He died a week later. Three days after his burial, his widow proved the will.

Peter Brackett's will reads: 8 August 1616 - I Peter Brackett of Sudbury in the countie of Suff and diocesse of Norwich being sicke in bodie but whole in minde ... Rachell my wiffe shall have all my goods chattells and impliments of householde in consideration that she shall bringe up my children and pay unto every one of my children twentye shillings apeece as namely Peter Richard and Rachell and my will is that that childe wch my wiffe is wth childe wth shall have twenty shillings to be paid unto them at their severall ages of Twenty and one yeares and if any of them doe dye before their portion to be divided among them that shalbe liveing. Item I will and my mynde is that my father Richard Bracket shall have the rente of my house in the pishe of St. Peters in Sudburye wherein one Martyn London now dwelleth during his naturall life and after his deceasse I will and my minde is that my said house shalbe solde by my wiffe and the money thereof to be devided amonge my children that shalbe then living and my will is that my eldest sonne Peter Bracket shall have ffive pounds more then the residue. Item I ordaine and make Rachell my Loving wiffe to be executrix of this my last will and testament. Signed Peter Bracket Witnesses: ... Ruggles, Rychard Bracket, Thomas Grigges, Edward Strachie and William Strutt. Proved 28 Aug 1616
found on ancestry.com

ANDREW VINCENT 1525-1580

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of Hannah Polina Child (Elmer), daughter of Polly Barber (Child), daughter of Ichabod Barber, son of Mary Barney (Barber), daugther of Israel Barney, son of Elizabeth Brackett (Barney), daughter of Elizabeth Waldo (Brackett), daughter of Josiah Brackett, son of Alice Blower (Brackett), daughter of Thomas Blower, son of Susanna Vincent (Blower), daugther of Andrew Vincent.]

Andrew Vincent
According to Threlfall's GMC50, Andrew Vincent "of Bildeston, Suffolk, England, was probably born 1520-1530 at Bildeston. He married Alice and had eight known children. He made his will on 3 December 1580, being sick and knowing that their death was near. He probably died the next day for he was buried on the 5th in the churchyard at Bildeston. An abstract of his will follows. From this will it can be seen that he owned a fair amount of property, and was a substantial man of his day. Some of this property, if not all, had been inherited from his father. His home was on Newbery Street in Bildeston."
found on ancestry.com

THOMASINE BELGRAVE (FROST) 1562-1616

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of Hannah Polina Child (Elmer), daughter of Polly Barber (Child), daughter of Ichabod Barber, son of Mary Barney (Barber), daugther of Israel Barney, son of Elizabeth Brackett (Barney), daughter of Elizabeth Waldo (Brackett), daughter of Josiah Brackett, son of Alice Blower (Brackett), daughter of Alice Frost (Blower), daughter of Thomasine Belgrave (Frost).]

ALSO ON MILLER-AANDERSON.BLOGSPOT.COM

[Ancestral Link: Marguerite Anderson (Miller), daughter of Hannah Anderson (Anderson), daughter of Mary Margaret Edmiston (Anderson), daughter of Martha Jane Snow (Edmiston), daughter of Gardner Snow, son of James Snow, son of Zerrubbabel Snow, son of Abigail Brigham (Snow), daughter of Gershom Brigham, son of Mary Rice (Brigham), daughter of Henry Rice, son of Thomasine Frost (Rice), daughter of Thomasine Belgrave (Frost).]

Thomasine Belgrave
Parents: John Belgrave (c.1535 in England buried 2-12-1590 in Leverington, Cambridgeshire County, England) and Joanna Strutt (c.1536 in Glemsford, Suffolk County, England buried 8-14-1577 in Leverington, Cambridgeshire County, England)

Married: 9-22-1560 at Glemsford, Suffolk County, England

Children: Thomasine (2-1-1561/62), Elizabeth (2-16-1563/64), Catherine (3-31-1566), Thomas (12-13-1567), Abraham (12-27-1569), George (8-31-1571), Barbara (6-12-1575 buried 5-4-1576 at Leverington, England), Barbara (6-27-1577 buried 9-17-1589 at Leverington, England)
Joanna Strutt

Parents: John Strutt (buried 4-22-1591 in Glemsford, Suffolk County, England) and Catherine (buried 8-18-1578 in Glemsford, Suffolk County, England)
Children: Joanna (Belgrave) (buried 8-14-1577), Thomas, Ambrose (3-22-1563 died young)

Grandparents: Thomas Strutt (died between 6-2-1544 and 12-10-1548 in Melford, Suffolk County, England) and Joanne (died after 6-2-1548 in probably Melford, England)
Children: John (? To 4-1591 in Glemsford, England), Erasmus, Audrey, Eustace, Ursula

Great grandparents: John Strutt (died between 9-16-1516 and 2-5-1517 in Glemsford, Suffolk County, England) and Isabelle (died between 9-22-1526 and 11-13-1526 in Glemsford, Suffolk Coonty, England)

Children: Thomas, John, Robert, Elizabeth, Alice, Katherine, Margery

Sources:
The Paternal Ancestry of Thomasine Frost, Wife of Edmund Frost of Sudbury, Massachusetts, Harold F. Porter, TAG 63 (1988): 131-137.

Strutt Ancestry of Thomasine Frost, Wife of Edmund Rice of Sudbury, Massachusetts, Porter, Harold F. Jr., TAG 61 (1985): 161-166.

Ancestry of the Wife of Edmund Rice, Archibald F. Bennett, Esq., TAG 26 (1950): 10-11.

Wife of Edmund Rice, Mary Lovering Holman, TAG 15 (1950): 227.

Alice (Frost) (Blower) Tilley, Anderson, Robert Charles, TAG 71 (1996): 113.

Great Migration: Immigrants to New England 1634-1635, Vol. 1, Anderson, Robert Charles, Sanborn, George F. Jr., and Sanborn, Melinde Lutz, Boston, NEGHS, 1999.

English Origins of Philemon Whale of Sudbury, Massachusetts, Anderson, Robert Charles, TAG 6 (1985): 131-141.
found on ancestry.com

EDMOND FROST 1593-1672

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of Hannah Polina Child (Elmer), daughter of Polly Barber (Child), daughter of Ichabod Barber, son of Mary Barney (Barber), daugther of Israel Barney, son of Elizabeth Brackett (Barney), daughter of Elizabeth Waldo (Brackett), daughter of Josiah Brackett, son of Alice Blower (Brackett), daughter of Alice Frost (Blower), daughter of Edmond Frost.]

ALSO ON MILLER-AANDERSON.BLOGSPOT.COM

[Ancestral Link: Marguerite Anderson (Miller), daughter of Hannah Anderson (Anderson), daughter of Mary Margaret Edmiston (Anderson), daughter of Martha Jane Snow (Edmiston), daughter of Gardner Snow, son of James Snow, son of Zerrubbabel Snow, son of Abigail Brigham (Snow), daughter of Gershom Brigham, son of Mary Rice (Brigham), daughter of Henry Rice, son of Thomasine Frost (Rice), daughter of Edmond Frost.]



Edmond Frost Burying Ground
In Old Burying ground Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts
Edmond Frost grave in Old burying ground, Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts

Church at Old Burying Ground

Edmond Frost and several members of his family buried here.

Edmund's House
House in Cambridge Middlesex, Massachusetts

Edmund Frost's history
Edmund Frost was born in the neighborhood of Hartest, County of Suffolk, England, about the year 1600. He must have early associated himself with the non-conformist or dissenting portion of the Protestant element in England. Even attendance at such services to the neglect of the established church, was visited with the severest punishment, which sometimes did not stop short of fine and imprisonment. Mr. Clinsworth in his “Counterpoyson” refers to the fact that while the famous English divine, Mr. Robinson, was preaching secretly near Norwich, Norfolk County, England, (1600-4), certain members of his congregation “were excommunicated for restoring unto and praying with him.” Edmund Frost married at Hartest, about the year 1630, a woman whose first name was “Thomasine.” His first son, John, was born in England about the year 1632. On October 16, 1634, Edmund Frost, with his wife and son John, boarded the ship great Hope (Captain Gurling) at Ipswich, England, for Boston, Massachusetts. He was one of the leaders of Rev. Thos. Shepard’s party, whom religious persecution had driven to seek refuge in America. Rev. Thomas Shepard, in his autobiography, referred to him as “his most dear brother Frost.” In the words of Edmund Frost’s great grandson, Rev. Amariah Frost, “he came to the then savage wilderness of America to escape the more savage oppression of England.” The Great hope was shipwrecked off Yarmouth, but Edmund Frost and all the rest of the passengers on the ship were saved. After some delay the ship “Defence” was secured (captain Bostock, master) and on his ship Edmund Frost sailed for Boston from Gravesend, Kent County, England, on August 10, 1635. Owing to the difficulties arising over the persecution of all dissenters by the government at that time, Edmund Frost, as well as Rev. Thomas Shepard himself and others, had to embark under an assumed name, else they could have not escaped the “poursuivants” as the officers were called. On October 2, 1635, the ship “Defence” arrived in Boston harbor. The company almost to the man at once moved over and located at Cambridge, Massachusetts. This place had already been settled by Rev. Thomas hooker and his party, but the latter had made their plans for emigrating to Connecticut. It thus appears that the first real permanent settlement at Cambridge, Massachusetts, was made by Rev. Thomas Shepard and his colony of immigrants. This included representatives of the following families, all of whom are connected with the earliest history of Cambridge, to wit: Shepard, Frost, Champney, Goffe, Cooke, and Norton.

In the first allotment of lands we find Edmund Frost located on what is known at this day as the westerly side of Dunster Street, between Harvard Square and Mt. Auburn Street. On March 3, 1636, Edmund Frost was admitted and enrolled as a freeman of Cambridge. Gov. Winthrop, in his Journal, speaks about attending on the 11th day of February, 1636, the installation of Rev. Thomas Shepard, as pastor, and his two elders into their respective offices in the first church at Cambridge.

The two elders were, undoubtedly, Edmund frost and Richard Champney. He describes the entire ceremony with great minuteness of detail. Then Colonel William Goffe in his “Diary,” speaks of visiting Elder Edmund Frost on August 23, 1660, and observed to him that a glorious saint makes a lowly cottage a stately palace. “Were I to take my choice I would rather abide with this saint in his poor cottage than with any of the princes that I know of at this day in the world.” Indeed, it appears from the records of Cambridge that Edmund Frost never prospered in the wordly sense, but always was poor in purse. But though not gifted with wealth, he was a most godly man and greatly respected. During his life at Cambridge, from 1635 until his death in 1672, eight children were born. He wife Thomasine, died and he remarried later. He was noted all his days as a most pious and humble Christian, a faithful disciple of the Master. In every way a worthy progenitor of the great family which bears his name. Thomas G. Frost, in Frost family in England and America, with special reference to Edmund Frost by Edward Lysander Frost
found on ancestry.com

Edmund Frost
Edmund Frost sailed from Ipswich, England on the Great Hope, but the ship was wrecked off Yarmouth. He later boarded The Defense with his wife and son and departed England from Gravesend, Kent on August 10, 1635. He arrived in Boston on October 2, 1635. He was one of the first members of the First Congregational Church of Cambridge and was installed as its first Ruling Elder February 11, 1636. He was sworn a freeman March 3, 1636. About 1639 he bought from Thomas Blodgett property on the west side of Dunster street between Harvard Square and Mt. Auburn street, which he later sold and bought a house on Garden street. After 1646 he occupied a homestead on Kirkland street.

When Colonel Goffe, the "regicide" (one of those who sentenced Charles I to death), came to New England, he went to see Edmund Frost and wrote of the visit in his journal, August 23, 1660, "In ye evening wee vissited Elder Frost, who rec'd us with great kindness and love, esteeming it a favour yt we would come into ye mean habitation, assured us of his fervent prayers to ye Lord for us; a glorious saint makes a mean cottage a stately palace; were I to make my choice, I would rather abide with ye saint in his poor cottage than with any of ye princes I know of at ye day ye world."

The revered Elder died July 12, 1672, and his will was signed with his written signature and named his children, all but the first born in Cambridge. To his wife Reana, he left the use of his land and 20 shillings a year during her lifetime, to be paid in corn or cattle by sons Ephraim and Thomas; also 20 shillings a year to be paid by son John. There were other cash bequests and the dwelling was left to Ephraim and Thomas.
found on ancestry.com

Generation #2
Edmund Frost was born 28 August 1593 at Hartest, Suffolk, England and died 12 July 1672 at Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. He was a "preaching elder" and was obliged to leave England under an assumed name because he dissented from Church views. In 1635 he immigrated to Cambridge, Massachusetts with his first wife and son John, becoming a freeman there 3 March 1636. He was one of the original members of First Congregational Church of Cambridge and was installed as Elder 11 February 1636. He married first Thomasine c1630 at Hartest, Suffolk, England. (She was not surnamed Belgrave, Thomasine Belgrave was the wife of another Frost named Edward.) She died 13 June 1653 at Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. Edmund Frost married second to Mary c1653. She died before 1669. He married third to Reana before 1669. She died before 3 November 1675 when an inventory of her estate was made. Reana had married first to Edmund James before 1640, second to William Andrews (-1652) c11 August 1640, and third to Robert Daniel (-1655) 2 May 1654.


Children of Edmund Frost and Thomasine:
John Frost born c1632 at England; died c30 September 1672; married 26 June 1666 to Rebecca Andrew at Massachusetts and had the following children: John Frost (19 November 1667-); Rebecca Frost (3 December 1669-1 July 1750); and Thomas Frost


Thomas Frost born March 1636/7 at Cambridge, (now Middlesex County), Massachusetts; died 1639 at Cambridge, (now Middlesex County), Massachusetts


Samuel Frost born 13 February 1638/9 at Cambridge, (now Middlesex County), Massachusetts; died 7 January 1717/8 at Billerica, Middlesex County, Massachusetts; married 12 October 1663 to Mary Cole; married before 1674 to Elizabeth Miller


Joseph Frost born 13 January 1639/40 at Cambridge, (now Middlesex County), Massachusetts; died 1692; married 22 May 1666 to Hannah Miller (1649-) (sister of Elizabeth Miller) at Charlestown, Massachusetts and had the following children: Jabez Frost (12 December 1667-); Susanna Frost (27 January 1668/9-); Joseph Frost (15 February 1670/7-); Stephen Frost (9 March 1672/3-); Nathaniel Frost (baptized 7 May 1676-); Hannah Frost (30 August 1677-); Abigail Frost (12 March 1679/80-); Miller Frost (28 February 1682/3-); and Faith Frost (9 September 1687-)


Deacon James Frost born 9 April 1643 at Cambridge, (now Middlesex County), Massachusetts;
died 12 August 1711 at Billerica, Middlesex County, Massachusetts; married 17 December 1664 to Rebecca Hamlet (-20 August 1666) at Billerica, Middlesex County, Massachusetts and had child: James Frost, Jr. (14 August 1666-5 January 1754); married 22 January 1667 to Elizabeth Foster (-1726) at Billerica, Middlesex County, Massachusetts and had the following children: Thomas Frost (18 October 1667-March 1742); John Frost (14 November 1668-3 March 1668/9); Samuel Frost (28 February 1669/70-); Elizabeth Frost (6 November 1672-); Edmund Frost (14 May 1675-18 May 1675); Mary Frost (6 May 1676-); Sarah Frost (15 July 1678-); Hannah Frost (31 January 1680/1-); Joseph Frost (21 March 1682/3-28 December 1737); Abigail Frost (3 August 1685-); and Benjamin Frost (8 March 1687/8-24 March 1753)


Mary Frost born 24 July 1645 at Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts


Ephraim Frost born 1646 at Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts; died 2 January 1717/8; married before 1678 to Hepzibah Pratt and had the following children: Mary Frost (20 May 1678-); Edmund Frost (14 March 1679/80-6 November 1752); Ephraim Frost (23 September 1682-26 July 1769); Thomas Frost (c1688-3 May 1765); Ebenezer Frost (baptized 17 January 1696/7-1768); and Sarah Frost (c1669-11 August 1747)


Thomas Frost born 1647 at Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts; died 1724; married 12 November 1678 to Mary Gibbs (1652-20 February 1690/1) at Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts and had the following children: Thomas Frost (23 August 1679-29 - February 1751); John Frost (14 September 1684-between 15 February 1758 - September 1763); Samuel Frost (23 November 1686 - 2 August 1736); and Mary (8 November 1690-died aged 3 months). Mary Gibbs had married first John Goodridge (1643-1676) 23 March 1674/5. married 9 July 1691 to Hannah Johnson (27 April 1656-3 May 1712) and had child: Sarah Frost (c1692-9 December 1717); married 12 December 1712 to Sarah Singletary


Child of Edmund Frost and Mary:
Sarah Frost born 1653 at Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts

Two generations: Frost family in England and America, with special reference to Edmund Frost ...
By Thomas Gold Frost, Edward Lysander Frost
http://books.google.com/books?id=B4BMAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA54&lpg=PA54& dq=%22reana+daniel%22%2Bfrost&source=bl&ots=IvaN2jdNgr&sig=s6YYeZlR9_fIjUJDCHAflDx6I6s& hl=en&ei=-2EQTMnBNpHkNaKD6I0D&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CA YQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22reana%20daniel%22%2Bfrost&f=false
found on ancestry.com

A bit of history
Edmund Frost was born 28 August 1593 at Hartest, Suffolk, England and died 12 July 1672 at Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. He was a "preaching elder" and was obliged to leave England under an assumed name because he dissented from Church views. In 1635 he immigrated to Cambridge, Massachusetts with his first wife and son John, becoming a freeman there 3 March 1636. He was one of the original members of First Congregational Church of Cambridge and was installed as Elder 11 February 1636. He married first Thomasine c1630 at Hartest, Suffolk, England.
found on ancestry.com

On the first governing board of Harvard College
"Harvard College was founded in 1636 and by virtue of his office as church elder Edmund Frost became one of its first governing board, and donated books to its first library."

Encyclopedia of Massachusetts, Biographical--genealogical By William Richard Cutter, American Historical Society
found on ancestry.com

ALICE FROST (BLOWER) (TILLEY) 1594-

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of Hannah Polina Child (Elmer), daughter of Polly Barber (Child), daughter of Ichabod Barber, son of Mary Barney (Barber), daugther of Israel Barney, son of Elizabeth Brackett (Barney), daughter of Elizabeth Waldo (Brackett), daughter of Josiah Brackett, son of Alice Blower (Brackett), daughter of Alice Frost (Blower).]

American Women's First Collective Political Action: Boston 1649 - 1650
1996 , http://www.arts.cornell.edu/newsletr/spring96/norton.htm
Arts and Sciences Newsletter Spring 1996 Vol. 17 No. 2 American Women's First Collective Political Action: Boston 1649 - 1650 Mary Beth Norton

If asked when American women first began to organize collectively around reproductive issues, most people today would probably respond, "after the Roe v. Wade decision in 1972," or "when Margaret Sanger began to promote birth control in the early twentieth century." A few students of women"s history might recall the nineteenth"century feminist demand that women be allowed "bodily integrity""that is, that they should be able to refuse sexual intercourse with their husbands. But none of those answers is correct. The first such political action by American women occurred nearly 350 years ago.

Although I have studied colonial women for more than two decades, until recently even I was unaware of the remarkable case described herein. While researching my new book on gender relations in seventeenth"century America, Founding Mothers and Fathers (published by Alfred A. Knopf earlier this spring), I came across a sentence that led me to these important documents. A 1965 monograph on the early history of Boston mentioned that a group of townswomen had petitioned colonial authorities "on behalf of midwife Alice Tilly, accused of the 'miscarrying of many wimen and children under hir hand.'" The footnote implied that there was more than one petition but did not say how many, nor did it give any indication of the date(s).

I accordingly wrote to the Massachusetts State Archives, citing the footnote and asking for photocopies of any relevant documents. The response surprised me. There were six petitions in all, four from Boston and two from Dorchester, along with a deposition. Unfortunately, the archivist reported, the originals were now unreadable, but negative photostats made in the 1920s were available; she enclosed white"on"black copies of those. The astonishing aspect of the petitions was the total number of signatures (294), ranging from a low of eight and twenty"one on the first petitions to a high of 130 on the last.

The petitions were not dated, but the deposition was: March 8, 1648 [1649 by today"s calendar]. That explained why no historian had yet studied the case: the records of the Court of Assistants, before which Alice Tilly would have been tried, are missing for the years 1644 to 1673. Accordingly, most of what we know about the trial of Mistress Tilly (the title revealed her high status) comes from the petitions.

Those documents and a few other scattered records allow us to reconstruct at least a partial picture of the first known collective political action by American women. Although no exact account of the charges against Alice Tilly has survived, on May 2, 1649, the Massachusetts General Court (legislature) adopted a law forbidding either physicians or midwives from "exercis[ing] any force, violence, or cruelty upon or towards the bodies of any, whether yong or ould (no, not in the most difficult & desperate cases)." The law, unique among colonial statutes, implies that Mistress Tilly in the course of her medical practice had taken some action that the authorities thought unwarranted. The deposition (offered by another midwife) suggests the same, for it detailed a variety of situations that might arise during childbirth and contended that certain methods of handling them were common rather than unusual or cruel.

The female petitioners vehemently disagreed with the male authorities" assessment of Mistress Tilly. As the second group of Bostonians declared, they thought her "the ablest midwife in the land." The Dorchester women expressed their confidence in her, writing of how they were "affrayd to putt our selves into the hands of any besides our midwife that wee have had experience of," for she had helped them "even in such tymes as in the eye of sence or reason nothinge but Death was to be expected." Indeed, the Boston women insisted that Mistress Tilly "hath through the goodnes of God bin carried through such difficulties in her calling that none of those who are her accusers could Doe but have either sent for her or left the work undone."

The implication of the petitions, therefore, is that Alice Tilly was the preeminent Boston midwife, the one most likely to be summoned in "desperate" cases. That conclusion is borne out by the circumstances that elicited the six petitions, which fall into three groups. The first set of three, submitted before her trial, asked that she be permitted to leave jail to attend her patients. Evidently that request was rejected, because the fourth petition, written after she had been tried and convicted, renewed the request and alluded to "sad events" that had occurred in the interim, presumably because of her absence. Led by the wife of the chief pastor of the Boston church, twenty-six female Bostonians begged the judges to "heare the cryes of mothers, and of children yet unborn." This time the court acquiesced, allowing Mistress Tilly to leave prison whenever she was needed at childbeds. But her husband eventually threatened to move the family elsewhere "unless her innocencie may be cleared." Consequently, in spring 1650, the women of Boston and Dorchester again submitted two petitions on her behalf, entreating the General Court to free her from custody absolutely.

That angered the officials, who accused her of seeking "nothinge but a compleat victory" and testily asserted that there was "as much need to upphold magistracy in their authority as Mris Tilly in her midwivery." Yet the women pointedly reminded the General Court that they wrote not just for themselves but also on behalf of "the security of your children." That the 130 signatories to the final petition intended that phrase to be taken literally is demonstrated by the fact that included among their number were several relatives of the legislators. Apparently the petitions were successful; at least, the Tillys still resided in Boston fifteen years later.

I have identified all but twenty of the petitioners, and will soon submit the edited documents to a scholarly journal. Research conducted by my assistants A. Paige Shipman '94 and Cathy Simpson '96 proves that most of the signatories - as would be expected - were women in their prime childbearing years or, occasionally, the mothers or mothers-in-law of such women. These remarkable petitions demonstrate the centrality of reproductive issues in women's lives from the earliest years of the English colonies and thus provide a striking backdrop against which to interpret such currently contentious subjects as abortion rights, in vitro fertilization, and research on human embryos. They also reveal that the "gender gap" has a long history in American politics: the petitions leave no doubt that the verdict in the trial of Mistress Alice Tilly would have been quite different had women comprised the Bay Colony"s Court of Assistants in the spring of 1649.
found on ancestry.com

William Tilley, Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, pg. 686
Tilley, William, Boston, had w. Alice, ±62 in 1665, a popular mid-wife and a trial to the magistrates, who having put her in jail for some offense, ±1649, were showered by petitions from Boston and Dorchester women in her favor. She, under his p/a, sold their Boston ho. 1649, he prob. at Cape Porpus where he was in 1650 and 1652. Both liv. 1665. Only kn. ch: Sarah, m. 1st Henry Lynn(2), 2d Hugh Gunnison(2), 3d Capt. John Mitchell(5), 4th Dr. Francis Morgan (2).
found on ancestry.com

Alice Frost Blower Tilley
Birth: 1594
Death: unknown

Thomas Blower married at Stanstead, Suffolk, 19 November 1612, Alice Frost; baptized at Stanstead, 1 December 1594, daughter of Edward and Thomasine (Belgrave) Frost.

They had 7-8 children: Hannah, Alice BRACKETT, Joshua, Thomas, Mary, John, Thomas, and (probably) Pyam.

She married (2) probably at Barnstable, soon after 6 July 1640, William Tilley. Alice (Frost) (Blower) Tilley was sister of Thomasine Frost, who married Edmund Rice, immigrant to Sudbury, and also of Elizabeth Frost, who married 1st Henry Rice and then Philemon Whale, the latter also an immigrant to Sudbury.

William Tilley married, soon after 6 July 1640 (probably at Barnstable), Alice (Frost) Blower, daughter of Edward Frost and widow of Thomas Blower (1635, Boston). (On 6 July 1640, John Mayo, minister at Barnstable, certified "that the purpose of marriage betwixt Mr. Tylly of Barnestable and Mrs. Blower of Boston hath been three several times published in the meeting at Barnestable"

Several interconnected topics in the life of William Tilly deserve discussion: the identity of his wife; a fine which he incurred soon after his arrival in New England; and whether he had any children.

On 18 February 1633/4, the Court of High Commission, convened at Lambeth Palace, considered the case of "Henricus [sic] Blower." On 24 January 1632/3, "she was fined in £100 for her notorious contempt of ecclesiastical laws and jurisdiction in her [illegible] carriages and so the [illegible] and the certifying thereof was respited until this day. This day inasmuch as neither the said Alice Blower nor anybody else for her gave in any petition to desire any mitigation of her fine imposed upon her, the said fine of an hundred pounds was [ordered?] to be certified into his highness exchequer and estreated to his highness use." On 26 June 1634, the case was considered again, the commissioners "finding that the said Alice Blower had removed herself long since from Sudbury where the offense was given, and thereby the scandal grown by her taken away, and for that she had in all obedience submitted herself and would continue herself conformable to the order's doctrine, and discipline of the Church of England, she was dismissed from further attendance touching this cause, and all bonds by her or any her sureties entered touching the same are ordered to be cancelled and delivered unto her." On 27 March 1668, "Alice Tilly the wife of William Tilly aged about 66 years testifieth that Martha Haffield late of Ipswich deceased and sometime wife of Richard Haffield of Ipswich also deceased was maidservant to this deponent about the time she was married to the said Richard Haffield and the said Richard had a son and two daughters by a former wife to which children the said Martha the latter wife carried herself very abusive and unreasonable both in want of necessary apparel and other ways as in many hard words and blows in my sight and hearing; further this deponent testifieth that the parents of the said Martha abovenamed were very poor and were not able to give her any portion that was known to their neighbors the which caused this deponent and other of neighbors to wonder at the strange and froward behavior to her said husband his children." (This deposition was part of the contest over the estate of Richard Haffield.)This deposition provides two pieces of information impinging on the identity of the wife of William Tilly. First, Richard Haffield (1635, Ipswich) derived from Sudbury, Suffolk, and married his second wife, Martha, about 1627, which places this deponent in Sudbury at that time, which is consistent with what we know about Alice (Frost) Blower. This also connects with the Court of High Commission record of 26 June 1634, which stated that "Alice Blower had removed herself long since from Sudbury."Second, she gives her age as "about 66 years" in 1668, which places her birth about 1602, whereas Alice (Frost) Blower was baptized in 1594, and so would seem to have been nearly a decade older than this deponent. However, the wife of William Tilly apparently made another deposition, in which she gave her age as about 62 in 1665, which would place her birth in about 1603, in accord with the 1668 deposition. Since these two stated ages are the only evidence inconsistent with the identification of Alice (Frost) Blower as the wife of William Tilly, and since all the other evidence points towards that identification, we suggest that in her seventh decade Alice chose to present herself as a younger woman, given that she was more than a decade older than William Tilly.Alice (Frost) (Blower) Tilly was a prominent midwife, who in 1648 ran afoul of the authorities and was jailed, which stimulated a number of undated petitions in her support, signed by dozens of Boston and Dorchester women. On 17 November 1648, "W[illia]m Tilly of Boston do hereby make and ordain my wellbeloved friend Hugh Gullison of Boston my true and lawful attorney for me and in my name to implead and arrest and prosecute and recover of W[illia]m Phillips of Boston and his wife or either or both of them or any person or persons that hath or shall hereafter defame or slander my wellbeloved wife Alice Tilly in respect of her calling or otherwise … and also in case my said attorney shall at any time be wanting or disabled to prosecute the said parties, then I do also hereby authorize my friend John Sherman to prosecute the said parties." (This document may also have authorized Alice Tilly to sell her husband's Boston land a few months later.)

Soon after his arrival in New England, William Tilly had been fined for not paying excise duties on wine he had imported. On 11 November 1647, "upon Mrs. Tyly her petition, the court doth think fit that the fine of £4, mentioned in her petition, stand charged upon her husband, and be forthwith levided according to law."

On 16 April 1649, "William Tylly," writing from "Cape Porpes," petitioned the General Court that he "was for certain years since by the Court of Assistants holden in the 10 month when Mr. Dudleigh was governor fine[d] £4 for refusing to take an oath and thereon to declare what he had done with a parcel of wine that he had lawfully bought that year before and as honestly paid for and as righteously sold according to an order of the General Court there produced though your petitioner told them he was ready to pay anything they proved against him and also of four butts that he had in all he could procure eleven quarter cask carried out of the province besides smaller rundlets and cases, but for the taking this oath was altogether against his conscience neither could a nice rule be given him from God's word to justify such a practice in him, now sithence the marshal still lieth at me to pay it and thinking that I have such good reasons to move the honored court to pity me herein I have made bold to present my desires that the marshal may cross his book or I may have my quietness considering (1) I have but little if debts paid, (2) the difficulty in getting £4 in my employment, (3) none required to take the oath but myself, (4) the order never published as I was credibly informed, I am sure that I never heard of it for if I had I hope I should have saved the imposing of that oath if all the springs in the country had not been dry, (5) another order on record extant at the same time repealing the order by which I was fined, (6) the great immunity that you have granted in that [once?] laws published to the world's view that no man's estate shall be taken under pretence of law, but by law established and sufficiently published, the request of your poor petitioner is therefore again to entreat to take off this fine from me and I shall ever rest yours as I hope I am in Jesus Christ." On 4 May 1649, Massachusetts Bay General Court "received a petition from W[illia]m Tilley, for the abatement of a fine of four pounds, the answer whereof was, that with the 10s. for fees for the petition, all the fine should be abaed to forty shillings."In this deposition, Tilly claimed that he was fined at a court "in the 10 month when Mr. Dudleigh was governor," which would be in December of 1634. This would imply that this deponent could not have been the 1635 passenger. In this case, however, Tilly's memory has failed him, for the court order under which he was fined was made on 13 December 1636 (when Henry Vane was governor) and was repealed on 12 March 1637/8. The record of the imposition of the fine itself has not survived, nor was the fine referred to in the general amnesty of 1638.William Tilley witnessed documents at Cape Porpus on 8 July 1650 and 1 July 1652 and at York or Kittery on 27 February 1651[/2?]. Note that his removal from Boston to Cape Porpus took place at the time his wife was under attack for her midwifing activitiesNoyes, Libby and Davis stated that the "only known child" of William Tilly was "Sarah, married 1st Henry Lynn, 2d Hugh Gunnison, 3d Capt. John Mitcvhell, 4th Dr. Francis Morgan." Some of this same information was included in the sketches of Henry Lynn (1630, Boston) and of Hugh Gunnison (1635, Boston). This conclusion was based on William Tilly's involvement in a dispute arising out of the estate of Hugh Gunnison, which gave rise to the following document, in which Sarah calls William her father.On 26 May 1660, "Sarah Gunison" wrote to "Captain [Richard] Davenport" that " I have here enclosed Mr. Robert Saltinstoone's bill and my earnest request unto you is that you will be pleased to do me that favorable courtesy as in my name and behalf and for me to draw up a petition and profer it unto the General Court according to law concerning my land due from the country. Sir, I suppose I need not write at large about it yourself being so well informed in the business and willing to help one which is not in a capacity to help herself. I have intimated concerning it unto Mr. Russell, pary also advise with him desiring his assistance. I have not it spoken with [Mr.?] Peter Coffin and therefore cannot fully inform who I desire should be appointed to bound the land." After dating and signing this letter, Sarah added this addendum: "For if you shall lack money for the proferring of the petition ask it of my father Tilly" [MA Arch 15B:58].

However, close attention to chronology shows that Sarah cannot have been William's biological daughter. On 13 April 1660, "William Tilly aged about fifty [altered to fifty-three] years" deposed regarding a bond engaged in by his son-in-law Hugh Gunnison. This would mean that William Tilly was born about 1607, which is in accord with his age given on the 1635 passenger list. On 29 June 1670, "Mrs. Sarah Morgan the wife of Mr. Francis Morgan aged about 51 years" deposed in a civil proceeding, which computes to an approximate year of birth of 1619, consistent with her marriage to Henry Lynn by 1636. Thus, William Tilly was only about twelve years older than Sarah.A possible solution arises when we look at the life of his wife. Alice Frost was baptized in 1594, married Thomas Blower in 1612, and had children born at Sudbury, Suffolk, between 1613 and 1630. Probably because of gaps in the parish registers of Sudbury, however, no baptismal records have been found for this family between 1615 and 1621. We propose that the Sarah who married Henry Lynn and three other men was Sarah Blower, born about 1619, daughter of Thomas and Alice (Frost) Blower. She would, then, have been William Tilly's stepdaughter. This hypothese derives some slight further support from the observation that Henry Lynn and wife Sarah had a daughter Sarah who married William Rogers, and that this latter couple named a daughter Alice.On 11 October 1665, in "answer to the petition of Mr. Willjam Tilley, the court, having heard what he & his wife could say for themselves, judge meet to order and enjoin Mr. Tilley and his wife forthwith to live together as man and wife, that Mr. Tilly provide for her as his wife, and that she submit herself to him as she ought, on the penalty of forty pounds on his part, & imprisonment on hers"
Find A Grave Memorial# 38442871
found on ancestry.com

Women's Action Heroine
Alice Tilly or Tilley, a prominent Boston midwife, was at the center of a huge feminist controversy—indeed, one that historians refer to as American women’s first collective political action. The dispute erupted in spring 1649 when she the 54-year-old Tilly was tried, convicted, and imprisoned on spurious charges in Boston, and hundreds of women rallied to her support—a precursor to future actions around reproductive rights. For more information, see the really excellent scholarly article “The Ablest Midwife That Wee Knowe in the Land: Mistress Alice Tilly and the Women of Boston and Dorchester,” by Mary Beth Norman, 1998. A citation, ordering instructions, and part of the article can be found at http://www.jstor.org/pss/2674325. Another article by Norman, “American Women’s First Collective Political Action: Boston 1649–1650” can be read and printed free at http://www.arts.cornell.edu/newsletr/spring96/norton.htm. (Alice, described as “an active Puritan” and as “a professed servant of Jesus Christ both in old England and new,” originally married Thomas Blower on 19 November 1612 in Stanstead; he died in 1639 in Massachusetts, and she remarried William Tilly, a wine merchant 13 years her junior, at Dorchester, Boston, Massachusetts, in 1640. William lived in Barnstable, Massachusetts, and the couple had what might now be described as “a commuting marriage.” While Mistress Tilly, as she was known, was being harassed for practicing midwifery, her husband originated a countersuit against Susannah Phillips, one of her detractors, for slander. Because of the impassioned protestations of Boston women that Alice was necessary to their health and survival, she was actually allowed to leave prison to attend to the needs of women in the throes of childbirth. Little is known about her life after 1650.
found on ancestry.com

THOMAS BLOWER 1587-1639

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of Hannah Polina Child (Elmer), daughter of Polly Barber (Child), daughter of Ichabod Barber, son of Mary Barney (Barber), daugther of Israel Barney, son of Elizabeth Brackett (Barney), daughter of Elizabeth Waldo (Brackett), daughter of Josiah Brackett, son of Alice Blower (Brackett) (Tilly), daughter of Thomas Blower.]

Thomas Blower & family
Thomas Blower Jr. [Parents] was born on 23 April 1587 in Stanstead, Suffolk, England and was christened on 23 April 1587 in Stanstead, Suffolk, England. He died in 1639 in Suffolk, Massachusetts, New England and was buried about 1639 in, Suffolk, Massachusetts. Thomas married Alice Frost on 19 November 1612 in Stanstead, Suffolkshire, England.

Alice Frost [Parents] was born on 1 December 1594 in Stanstead, Suffolk, England and was christened on 1 December 1594 in Stanstead, Suffolk, England. She died after 9 September 1639 in, Suffolk, England. Alice married Thomas Blower Jr. on 19 November 1612 in Stanstead, Suffolkshire, England.

They had the following children:
F i Hannah Blower was born in 1613 in Sudbury, Suffolk, England. She died on 7 May 1630 in All Saints, Sudbury, England and was buried on 7 May 1630 in All Saints, Sudbury, Suffolk, England.
F ii Alice Blower was born on 30 June 1615 and died on 3 November 1690.

M iii John Blower was born in 1617 and died in 1675.

M iv Thomas Blower III was born in 1619/1620 in All Saints, Sudbury, England and was christened on 22 February 1623 in All Saints, Sudbury, Suffolk, England was buried on 25 April 1625 in All Saints, Sudbury, Suffolk, England.

M v Joshua Blower was christened on 15 December 1621 in All Saints, Sudbury, Suffolk, England, was buried on 22 August 1623 in All Saints, Sudbury, Suffolk, England.

F vi Mary Blower was christened on 13 February 1625 in All Saints, Sudbury, Suffolk, England. was buried on 7 February 1639 in All Saints, Sudbury, England.

M vii John Blower was christened on 23 February 1627 and died after 9 September 1675.

M viii Thomas Blower was christened on 16 May 1630 in All Saints, Sudbury, Suffolk, England.

M ix Pyam Blower was born about 1632 in Of Sudbury, Suffolk, England.

M x Pyam Blowers was born in 1638 and died on 1 June 1709.
found on ancestry.com

THOMAS BLOWER 1556-1581

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of Hannah Polina Child (Elmer), daughter of Polly Barber (Child), daughter of Ichabod Barber, son of Mary Barney (Barber), daugther of Israel Barney, son of Elizabeth Brackett (Barney), daughter of Josiah Brackett, son of Alice Blower (Brackett), daughter of Thomas Blower, son of Thomas Blower.]

Thomas Blower Sr and family
Thomas Blower [Parents] was born about 1545/1550 in Stanstead, Sussex, England. He died on 27 February 1581 in Stanstead, Sussex, England and was buried on 1 Octtober 1597 in , Lavenham, Suffolk, England. Thomas married Susannah Vincent on 27 February 1582 in Bildeston, Suffolk, England.

Susannah Vincent [Parents] was born in 1560 in Bildeston, Suffolk, England. She died after 1597 in Bildeston, Suffolk, England. Susannah married Thomas Blower on 27 February 1582 in Bildeston, Suffolk, England.

They had the following children:
F i Susanna Blower was born in 1582/1585 in Stanstead, Sussex, England.
M ii Thomas Blower was christened on 15 December 1585 in Stanstead, Suffolk, England. He died before 1587.
M iii Thomas Blower Jr. was born on 23 April 1587 and died in 1639.
M iv Caleb Blower was christened on 7 Jul 1588 in Stanstead, Suffolk, England. He died before 1597.
F v Alice Blower was christened on 15 March 1590 in Stanstead, Suffolk, England.
F vi Rachel Blower was christened on 12 October 1591 in Stanstead, Suffolk, England.
F vii Mary Blower was christened on 25 February 1593 in Stanstead, Suffolk, England.
M viii Blower was born about 1595 in Stanstead, Suffolk, England.
M ix Blower was born in 1597 in Stanstead, Sussex, England.
M x Child Blower was born about 1597 in Stanstead, Suffolk, England.
found on ancestry.com

Will of Thomas Blower
I, Thomas Blower of Lavenham in the County of Suffolk, Tanner, being sick in body but whole in mind ...

Item: I will that Susanna my wife pay unto John Blower my eldest son when he shall of the age of twenty-three years the sum of thirty pounds of good and lawful money of England and twenty pounds when he shall be of the age of twenty-five years and if yesaid John so long shall live. But if the foresaid John do die before either of ye payments grow due then I will his portion to be equally divided amongst my sons and daughters then shall be living.

Item: I will that my land lying in Melford holden of the parsons of Melford as these lands, be equally divided between my two sons John and Thomas Blower either of them paying out of it unto ye child that now Susan my wife is withall, if it happens to be a son and lives to ye age of twenty-three years, at ye age of twenty-three years fifteen pounds apiece and if it happens to be a daughter then either of them to pay unto it fifty shillings in good and lawful money of England and so then further to payunto their other four sisters; Susanna, Alice, Rachel and Mary Blower, fifty shillings apiece of like English money when they shall be of age of twenty-one years and if either of my said daughters die before then their portion be divided then I will that those of them that live until it be due shall equally enjoy their parts.

Item I will that Susanna my wife shall have to her and her heirs forever all that my tenment with ye land and pasture thereunto belonging situate lying and being in Stanstead with all my debts and other my moveable goods what so ever yelding and paying to that child that now is withall if it be a daughter at the age of twenty-one years the sum of five pounds of lawful English money and also to my other four daughters, Susanna, Alice Rachel and Mary like sums of five pounds apiece to be payed unto eitherof them at ye like age of twenty-one years.

And to this my last will I appoint and ordaine for my executors, Susanna Blower, my wife and Nicholas Vincent, brother unto ye fore named Susanna and in testimony that this is my will and testament I the fore said Thomas have set my hand these being witnesses:
John Day by me Thomas Blower John Wright

Proved 27 October 1597
found on ancestry.com

WILLIAM THOMPSON 1576-1623

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of Hannah Polina Child (Elmer), daughter of Polly Barber (Child), daughter of Ichabod Barber, son of Mary Barney (Barber), daugther of Israel Barney, son of Elizabeth Brackett (Barney), daughter of Elizabeth Waldo (Brackett), daughter of Hannah Coggswell (Waldo), daughter of Elizabeth Thompson (Coggswell), daughter of William Thompson.]

The site of Hall Garth where many earlier Thompson’s lived, knocked down in the 1920’s. Viewed from the road at the bottom of Cold fell.
found on ancestry.com

ELIZABETH THOMPSON (COGGSWELL) 1594-1676

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of Hannah Polina Child (Elmer), daughter of Polly Barber (Child), daughter of Ichabod Barber, son of Mary Barney (Barber), daugther of Israel Barney, son of Elizabeth Brackett (Barney), daughter of Elizabeth Waldo (Brackett), daughter of Hannah Coggswell (Waldo), daughter of Elizabeth Thompson (Coggswell).]

Coggswell's Grant


Cogwell's Grant ( the original land grant ) is now a tourist spot 23 Dec 2010, Essex, Massachusetts address:


Cogwell's Grant

60 Spring St

Essex, Massachusetts 01929


This is part of the 300 acre land grant that was given to John Cogswell born, 1592 died 1669 that was in Ipswich (now Essex ).


The property was handed down a few generations and around 1728 his Great Grandson, Johnathan Cogswell born 1687, died 1752, built a house there that still exists ! It's now a tourist spot full of antiques. See this website for photos and info :
http://www.historicnewengland.org/historic-properties/homes/cogswells-grant


If you go to that site, and look at the left - click history for genealogy info and house history. found on ancestry.com


1636-1839: Cogswell Family: Westberry Lee
In 1636 the following entry appears in the Grants Book of the Town of Ipswich: “Granted to Mr. John Cogswell 300 acres of land at the further Chebokoe…”


John Cogswell (1592-1669) was born in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England, and embarked for New England in 1635 with his wife and eight children. Their ship, the Angel Gabriel was wrecked at Pemaquid Point, Maine, and though the family survived, they lost more than £5000 worth of property, including cattle, furniture, and money. After travelling south, Cogswell established a farm on the land granted to him in the part of Ipswich bounded by the Chebacco (or Chebokoe) River, which is now the town of Essex.


Cogswell referred to this property in documents as “Westberry Lee,” naming it after his birthplace in England, and a mortgage record for 1641 indicates a house and other buildings on the property. The seventeenth-century buildings do not survive, but archaeological evidence has revealed that a structure from that period had lain perpendicular to the existing 1728 house. In 1651, John Cogswell began to divide his property among his sons, deeding sixty acres each to William and John Jr. John Jr. immediately sold his acreage to William, and by 1657, John Sr. had sold the remaining 180 acres to William as well.

William Cogswell (1619-1700) was a successful farmer, and also served as a selectman and parish meeting moderator in Chebacco Parish. Records from this period show his farm included a malt house, a saw mill or grist mill, orchards, and crops of barley, hay, and salt marsh hay. In 1656, William was granted compensation by the Town of Ipswich for a highway that crossed the property, leading from Ipswich to Gloucester. He was also given permission to operate a ferry across the Chebacco (now Essex) River as part of the highway, charging two pence a person; the ferry was replaced by a horse bridge in 1666. On William’s death, he left his property to his four sons in fifty- to 100-acre parcels.

Captain Jonathan Cogswell (1661-1717) inherited eighty acres from his father in 1700, including the present house site, and as his brothers predeceased him, his land increased. By the end of his life seventeen years later, the farm had attained its present 165-acre configuration, which has remained intact to this day. Captain Cogswell was a merchant, Justice of the Peace, and a member of the militia. There is little documentation of his time on the farm, but his will leaves “his Negro man, Jack, and his Indian maid, Nell” to his wife, and the contents of his widow’s will in 1723 indicate a high degree of prosperity.

Jonathan Cogswell Jr. (1687-1752) inherited the 165-acre property in 1717 at age thirty, and his time at Westberry Lee is the most significant in terms of buildings that survive today. Two years after inheriting the property, Jonathan built a salt hay barn, the oldest building currently standing at Cogswell’s Grant. In 1728, he built the western portion of the current house, possibly as an addition to the existing seventeenth-century house that was oriented north to south. The terraces in front of the house may also date to his tenure, as they are typical of country house landscaping in this period.

By 1749, Jonathan Cogswell Jr. was so prosperous that he had the second-highest taxable wealth in all of Ipswich. Sometime before 1752, the seventeenth-century portion of the house was taken down, and a new addition, the eastern portion of the current house, was constructed. It appears that this portion of the house was not entirely finished, however, before Jonathan Jr. died in 1752. The farm was leased to tenant farmers until 1761, when Jonathan Jr.'s son was old enough to take possession.

Colonel Jonathan Cogswell (1740-1819) lived at Westberry Lee and worked the farm for thirty years, starting at age twenty-one, when he came into his majority. He was Captain of an Ipswich alarm list company raised in 1774, promoted to Major in 1775, and was Colonel of the Second Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteers in the army from 1776 until the end of the Revolutionary War. A Justice of the Peace, a member of the State Constitutional Convention in 1780, and part of the Massachusetts delegation to the United States Constitutional Convention in 1788, Colonel Cogswell was a prominent figure in the community. However, in 1791, Colonel Cogswell decided to move closer to Chebacco center, and upon the untimely death of his only son in 1813, Westberry Lee was once again leased to tenants. This was the last time that the Cogswell family resided at the farm, and though Colonel Cogswell’s widow refused to sell the property during her lifetime, it finally passed out of the family in 1839, two hundred years after John Cogswell’s original grant.

Plaque 1991, Pemaquid Lighthouse at Bristol, Maine, USA


Dedicated by Cogswell Family Association at the sight of the shipwreck of the passengers aboard the "Angel Gabriel".


Elizabeth Thompson Coggswell

Highland Cemetery, Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts


Cogswell in Historic homes etc. of Wocester
P126
John Cogswell, the immigrant ancestor, was born in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England, in 1592, the son of Edward and Alice Cogswell, of an ancient and honourable English lineage. He married, in England, September 10, 1615, Elizabeth Thompson, daughter of Rev. William and Phillis Thompson. Her father was vicar of the parish. They resided at Westbury till 1635, when they settled in Ipswich, Massachusetts. They came on the ill-fated ship “Angel Gabriel,” which was wrecked off the Maine coast August 15, 1635, the passengers of which were washed ashore at Pemaquid, Maine. Mr. Cogswell was the third settler in that part of Ipswich now the town of Essex. He was admitted a freeman March 3, 1636. He was a farmer in America, but a woollen manufacturer in the old country, and the English Cogswells at Westbury still own and operate woollen mills there, or did so until recently. His descendants have been very prominent in Massachusetts in every generation...his daughter Hannah married, 1652, Deacon Cornelius Waldo.


Historic homes and institutions and genealogical and personal memoirs of Worcester County, Massachusetts: with a history of Worcester Society of Antiquity, Volume 2 (Google eBook), by Ellery Bricknell Crane, Lewis Pub., 1907.
found on ancestry.com


The Cogswells on the Ocean

THE COGSWELLS ON THE OCEAN
May 23 to August 15, 1635

The Angel Gabriel was the ship on board which John Cogswell and Family crossed the Atlantic. This vessel, it appears from the Letters of John Aubrey, the celebrated antiquary of Wiltshire, was built by Sir Charles Snell for Sir Walter Raleigh, “for the designe for Guiana, which cost him the manor of Yatton Regnell, the farm of Eastern Piers, Thornhill, and the Church-lease of Bp. Cannings, which ship upon Sir Walter Raleigh's attainder was forfeited” Vid. Aubrey's Letters, Vol. 2 p. 514, Mss. Bodleian Library, Oxford, England.

Sir Walter Raleigh, who was executed October 29, 1618, doubtless made his second and last voyage, A.D. 1617-18 to Guiana, S.A., in the same ship in which the Cogswells came to America in 1635, and which became a wreck off Pemaquid, as Mather says: “was burst in pieces and cast away.”

John Cogswell, with wife Elizabeth and eight children, embarked May 23, 1635, at Bristol, England on the Angel Gabriel, for New England. Mr Cogswell had with him his three sons, William, John and Edward and five of his six daughters. One daughter was left in England, who afterward married and resided in London. Mr Cogswell took with him several farm and household servants, an amount of valuable furniture, farming implements housekeeping utensils and a considerable sum of money. They were detained many days after going on board the Angel Gabriel for lack of wind, so that not until June 4 did they actually set sail from Bristol. On the same day another vessel, The James, sailed, having on board emigrants for America, among them was Rev. Richard Mather, fleeing religious intolerance in England to find the home of religious freedom in the New World. He became the minister of Dorchester in the Colony of Massachusetts. Rev. Richard Matehr was the father of Increase Mather, D.D. , President of Harvard College, and the grandfather of Rev. Cotton Mather, minister of Boston, and the distinguished author of the Magnalia Christi Americana. Richard Mather's tombstone was thus inscribed:

“ Under this stone lies Richard Mather,
Who had a son greater than the father,
And eke a grandson greater than either.”

The Angel Gabriel was commanded by Capt. Andrews, who had on board with him two nephews, John and Thomas Burnham, sons of Robert and Mary (Andrews) Burnaham, and ancestors of the Burnhams in America. There were an board slao Samuel Haines, Ancestor of Hon. Andrew Mack Haines, of Galena, Ill., William Furber, and others seeking homes in New England. Both ships touched at Milford Haven Pembroke County, South Wales, amd June 22, they put to sea again and proceeded on their way, and many on board saw the English coast fade from view, never to be seen by them again with mortal eyes. The vessels kept company for about two weeks, when they became separated, but arrived about the same time on the coast of New England. The James lay at anchor off the Isles of Shoals, and the Angel Gabriel off Pemaquid, Maine, where the great storm and gale of August 15 of that year struck them. The James was torn from her anchors, and obliged to put to sea, but after two days of terrible battling with storm and wave, she reached Boston Harbor with “her sails rent in sunder, and split in pieces, as if they had been rotten ragges.” The passengers on the James landed in Boston, August 17, having been twelve weeks and two days on the passage. The Angel Gabriel fared still worse. “The storm was frightful at Pemaquid, the wind blowing from the northeast, the tide rising to a very unusual height, in some places more than twenty feet right up and down; this was succeeded by another and unaccountable tidal wave still higher.” The Angel Gabriel became a total wreck, passengers, cattle, and goods were all cast upon the angry waves. Among those who reached the shore with their lives were Mr. Cogswell and his family. Three or four passengers and one seaman perished, and there was the loss of cattle and much property. Thus ended the passage of The Cogswells on the Ocean, and thus became a fact: The Cogswells in America.
found on ancestry.com


Witch Trials 1692, Salem, Massachusetts
The Cogswells were involved in an attempt to prevent the execution of Goodwife Proctor in the Salem witch trials. According to Ipswich In The Massachusetts Bay Colony, 290-291, by Thomas Franklin Waters, The Ipswich Historical Society, 1905: "Five members of the Cogswell family were among the twenty prominent people who signed the petition drawn up by the Rev. John Wise on behalf of Goodwife Proctor, who stood accused of witchcraft. Mary Warren alleged that she had been threatened and abused by Goodwife Proctor, and that she had seen apparitions of people who had long since been murdered by the wife of John Proctor. This evidence prevailed and the good woman was sentenced to death.
found on ancestry.com

ALICE (COGGSWELL) 1570-1616

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of Hannah Polina Child (Elmer), daughter of Polly Barber (Child), daughter of Ichabod Barber, son of Mary Barney (Barber), daugther of Israel Barney, son of Elizabeth Brackett (Barney), daughter of Elizabeth Waldo (Brackett), daughter of Hannah Coggswell (Waldo), daughter of John Coggswell, son of Alice (Coggswell).]

Will of Alice Cogswell

"In the name of God, Amen. The 25th June 1615, I, Alice Cogeswell, of Westburie leighe, in the countie of Wilts, widowe, bequeath my soul to God & my bodie to be buried in the churchyaarde of Westburie. To my daughter Margaret, wife unto Thomas Marchaunt, £40, 2 pair of sheets, two pair of Pillstaxes, one of my best gownes & Petticoat. To Margery, Alice, Margaret, & Philadelphis, their children, £4 each. Unto Thomas, children, Wlizabeth Marcharnt, £20. To Elizabeth Erneley, £40, and sundry articles of linen. To Bridget, Catharine, Marie and Anne Erneley, £4 each. To Margery Wilkinge, her daughter, £40, & certain articles of linen. To Anthony & Anne, children of John Wilkinge, £4 each. To Anthony Cogeswell, £100, at the age of 23, and to have his livinge of Ludborne, when he is 21 years aged. To Jeffrey Cogswell at 23, £100. To each godchild twelve pence. I give unto the poore, 10s. I give unto Westburie Church, 10s. The residue of my estate to John Cogswell, my sonne, whom I appoint my Executor."

Signed, Alice Cogswell

Overseers: Jeffrey Whittaker, of Westburie; Anthony Selfe, of Dilton

The Will was proven and Probate - pending suit ­ was granted to John Cogswell, 11 May, 1616, and subsequent sentence admitted Walter Cogswell, a son not named in the Will.
found on ancestry.com

EDWARD COGGSWELL 1554-1616

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of Hannah Polina Child (Elmer), daughter of Polly Barber (Child), daughter of Ichabod Barber, son of Mary Barney (Barber), daugther of Israel Barney, son of Elizabeth Brackett (Barney), daughter of Elizabeth Waldo (Brackett), daughter of Hannah Coggswell (Waldo), daughter of John Coggswell, son of Edward Coggswell.]

Edward; born circa 1554

Edward Cogswell was born circa 1554 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. He was buried on January 12, 1616 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. His occupation was Clothier.

In 1591 he built the ancient home at what is now known as 145 Westbury Leigh. Restoration work uncovered three irregular lumps above the hearth, and further inspection revealed three shields carved in relief. One in inscribed "ECA (Edward Cogswell and Alicia), another reads "1591" and the third bears the Cogswell cloth logo, the use of which became compulsory for clothiers. The house was privately restored during the 1980s by Peter and Mary Jones. "His estates were designated Ludboune, Horningsham, and Ripond Mylls... were located in Frome Selwood, a few miles from Westbury." "He appears to have been one of the most successful and prosperous clothiers of the region."

About the year 1578, he married Alice who was born circa 1559 in Westbury Leigh, England. She was buried on May 11, 1616 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. They had the following Children:-

Margaret; born circa 1580 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; married November 1599, Thomas Merchante; child: Elizabeth Merchante

Elizabeth; born circa 1582 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. buried January 20, 1582 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England.

Elizabeth; born circa 1584 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; married Erneley; buried April 1, 1661.

John; born circa 1586 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; buried April 11, 1592 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England.

Robert; baptized May 28, 1588 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; probably died in infancy.

Andrew; (twin); baptized November 20, 1590 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; died in infancy.

Robert; (twin); baptized November 20, 1590 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; died in infancy.

John; in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England.

Margery; born circa 1593 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; buried 1626; married John Wilkins on September 3, 1610.

Anthonius; baptized August 30, 1595 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; buried June 28, 1597 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England.

Anthoney\Arthur; baptized January 19, 1596/97 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; died before 1651; married Margery Phipps circa 1617. She died a widow in 1651 at Ludbourne.

Geoffrey; baptized December 10, 1598 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; married Mary Yonge in 1617.

Elenor; born circa 1600 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; married Stephen Smythe circa 1620 in Westbury.

Walter; born circa 1602 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England.

Margerie; buried June 4, 1597
found on ancestry.com

Edward Cogswell (Coggswell)
Appears on the subsidy rolls for £6 in 1610. He had mills at Frome, which he left to John. Will names children Margaret, wife of Thomas Marchante, Elizabeth, wife of Richard Ernly, Margery, wife of John Wilkins; sisters Elinor Smythe wife of Stephen, widow Joane Freestone, widow Margaret Francklene, Margaret Whately, wife of John, Edith Stevens wife of Thomas; sons John, Anthony, Jeffrey, wife Alice. (NEHGR 25:185)

In 1591 he built the ancient home at what is now known as 145 Westbury Leigh. Restoration work uncovered three irregular lumps above the hearth, and further inspection revealed three shields carved in relief. One in inscribed "ECA (Edward Cogswell and Alicia), another reads "1591" and the third bears the Cogswell cloth logo, the use of which became compulsory for clothiers. The house was privately restored during the 1980s by Peter and Mary Jones. "His estates were designated Ludboune, Horningsham, and Ripond Mylls... were located in Frome Selwood, a few miles from Westbury." "He appears to have been one of the most successful and prosperous clothiers of the region." (http://members.aol.com/dcurtin1/gene/gen_cog.htm)
found on ancestry.com

ROBERT COGGSWELL 1510-

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of Hannah Polina Child (Elmer), daughter of Polly Barber (Child), daughter of Ichabod Barber, son of Mary Barney (Barber), daugther of Israel Barney, son of Elizabeth Brackett (Barney), daughter of Elizabeth Waldo (Brackett), daughter of Hannah Coggswell (Waldo), daughter of John Coggswell, son of Edward Coggswell, son of Robert Coggswell.]

Robert COGSWELL; was born in 1510 and baptized on November 30, 1510 in Westbury Leigh, England. He was a manufacturer of wollen cloth. "Tax records of 1545 show them [the five brothers] quite well established, especially Robert, who was the grandfather of John Cogswell, the immigrant to America in 1635."

He married Alice Adlam, the daughter John Adlam and Marjorie____ circa 1541. She was born circa 1518 and was buried on August 1, 1603 in Dilton, Wiltshire, England. They had the following Children:-

Robert born 1562; baptized April 1604; died 1587

Edward

George

Roger; married Ann Goodridge; of Warminster; Children:- Elinor baptized 1613; Edward baptized 1614

Robert

Johnimus; born June 10, 1563; buried 1569

Stephen; buried November 1609

Robert

Richard; buried, November 11, 1605

Joane; baptized May 8, 1573; married H. Freestone

Anna; born March 18, 1573.

Margaret; married 1----; married 2. William Franklene

Margery; married John Whateley on May 20, 1588

Edith; (Her name may have been Alice); married Thomas Stevens on February 7, 1596. They rem. to London. Child:- Margery Stevens

Roger; buried November 28, 1643; married Frances Goodridge on December 1, 1606.
found on ancestry.com

From http://alumni.media.mit.edu/~kristin/fambly/Cogswell/CogswellName.html

COGSWELL FAMILY LINE.pdf of the Cogswell Family Register Report .pdf of the Cogswell Family Descendant Chart

Jameson claims that the Cogswell name is tied in with the town of Coggeshall, Essex, England. This town dates to Roman times, when it was called Canonium. When the Saxons ruled, the name became Coed Garr's Hall, with its subsequent morphing to Coggashael in the time of Canute the Dane and finally to the modern Coggeshall[3]. The family supposedly lost its standing during the time of Henry VI and suffered its own diaspora around England at that time[3].

In 1046, Coggeshall was turned over to the Church in support of the Benedictine Monks of Canterbury, with the Abbey being officially founded as a Cistercian Order in 1139 at the behest of King Stephen and Queen Matilda[3].

In 1337, the M.P. from Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England was one Johanus Coggeskale. Jameson then refers the reader to The Annals of Coggeshall by Bryan Dale and The Chronicles of Ralph de Coggeshall (Latin text)[3].

Supposedly, the Cogswells originated in Essex and moved west to Westbury, Wiltshire, England. Westbury is in the Domesday Book with the entry "The King holds Westburie. Queen Editha held it, and it paid geld for 40 hides." Queen Editha held the area in 1044. She was consort of King Edward the Confessor[2].

Westbury's Arms were officially registered with the Heralds in the year 16 Elizabeth (1573). Supposedly, they are identical to John of Gaunt (fourth son of Edward III, bore). It was granted its charter of incorporation by Henry IV. Jameson says, "It is a parish forming the Hundred of Westbury, County of Wilts, and comprising the borough of Westbury, the chapelries of Bratton and Dilton, and the townships of Hawkeridge, Hayward, and Leigh, and containging about seventy thousand inhabitants, upward of two thousand of whom are in the town of Westbury. This town is twenty four miles northwest from Salisbury and ninety-eight miles west by south of London. The place is of great antiquity. It occupies the site of the old Roman military and trading station, Verlucio..."[2] Supposedly, this town was the seat of the West Saxon Kings. The Avon flows nearby. The major industry of this town was clothing[4].

Name Variations Include: Cogswell, Coggswell, Cosewell, Cogshall, Cogswel, Coggeshall, Hoggeshale, Cogesholl, Cogeshole, Coggashael, Cogshol, Coxhall, Cockshall, Coggshale. Coggeshall and Cogswell were fairly interchangeable in England, but in America they are two distinct families descended from two different men[2].

Cogswell Coat Of Arms: The Ancient Family Arms are:Argent, a cross between four escallops sable.Crest, a stag lodged sable attired or.Motto, "Hec sperno nec timeo"[2].

G11. Robert COGSWELL m. Ann [surname not known] 15008/15009

G10. Edward COGSWELL m. Alice [surname not known] 7504/7505

G9. John COGSWELL m. Elizabeth THOMPSON 3752/3753

G8. John COGSWELL m. [not known] 1876/1877

G7. John COGSWELL m. Margaret GIFFORD 938/939

G6. Moses HAWKES m. Margaret COGSWELL 468/469
found on ancestry.com

JOHN COGGSWELL 1591-1669

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of Hannah Polina Child (Elmer), daughter of Polly Barber (Child), daughter of Ichabod Barber, son of Mary Barney (Barber), daughter of Israel Barney, son of Elizabeth Brackett (Barney), daughter of Elizabeth Waldo (Brackett), daughter of Hannah Coggswell (Waldo), daughter of John Coggswell.]

Plaque 1991, Pemaquid Lighthouse at Bristol, Maine, USA
Dedicated by Cogswell Family Association at the sight of the shipwreck of the passengers aboard the "Angel Gabriel".



John Cogswell
John Cogswell, like William Ivory, left a very comfortable existence to come to America. Jameson recounts: "...At the age of twenty-three years he married the daughter of the parish vicar, succeeded to his father's business, and settled down in the old homestead. His parents died soon after his marriage, and he received by inheritance 'The Mylls called Ripond, situate within the Parish of Frome Selwood,' together with the home place and certain personal property. Like his father, he was a manufacturer of woollen fabrics, largely broadcloths and kerseymeres. The superior quality of these manufactures gave to his 'mylls' a favorable reputation, which appears to have been retained to the [1880s]. [In the 1880s,] [t]here are factories occupying much the same locations and still owned by Cogswells, which continue to put upon the markey woollen cloths that in Vienna and elsewhere have commanded the first premiums in the world exhibitions of our times..."[15]

So, with the following sale of their estate and home, they headed for America.

It appears that the family unit which came over definitely included: John [Sr.], Elizabeth (his wife) and their children Elizabeth, Mary, William, Edward and John [Jr.]. (Abigail and Sarah were born in America.) The question marks remain around Phyllis, Alice, Esther and Ruth; of whom there are no more records save their baptisms. At least one of them is the unnamed daughter who remained in England. She had two children and was visited by her brother John on his ill-fated final voyage to London. Jameson claims that eight of the children born in England went to America[15].

John, Sr. and his family sailed from Bristol on 23 May 1635 on the Angel Gabriel. It was shipwrecked off Pemaquid, Maine on 15 August 1635[10,30].
found on ancestry.com

John Cogswell
Mr. Cogswell and his family escaped with their lives, but well drenched by the sea and despoiled of valuables to the amount of five thousand pounds sterling. They were more fortunate than some who sailed with them, whom the angry waves gathered to a watery grave. On leaving England Mr. Cogswell had taken along with him a large tent, which now came into good service. This they pitched, and into it they gathered themselves and such stores as they could rescue from the waves. The darkness of that first night of the Cogswells in America found them housed beneath a tent on the beach. The next day they picked up what more of their goods they could, which had come ashore during the night or lay floating about upon the water. As soon as possible Mr. Cogswell, leaving his family, took passage for Boston. He there made a contract with a certain Capt. Gallup, who commanded a small barque, to sail for Pemaquid and transport his family to Ipswich, Massachusetts. This was a newly settled town to the eastward from Boston, and was called by the Indians, "Aggawam." Two years earlier, March, 1633, Mr. John Winthrop, son of Gov. John Winthrop, with ten others, had commenced a settlement in Aggawam. An act of incorporation was secured August 4, 1634, under the name of Ipswich. The name Ipswich is Saxon, in honor of the Saxon queen Eba, called "Eba's wych," i.e., Eba's house; hence Yppyswich or Ipswich. Some derive it from Gippewich, meaning "little city." In the early records are found the following enactments of the General Court:
found on ancestry.com

The Angel Gabriel and the Great Storm of 1635
The Angel Gabriel and the Great Storm of 1635 August of 1635 had been a fair one for the small settlements which were striving to establish themselves in New England. In the wheel of the year, haying would have just concluded, with the settlers mowing, drying, gathering and storing the hay for the upcoming winter during the hottest, most unforgiving part of summer. Crops would be nearing their peak, nearly ready for the September harvest time. However, for "...[t]he whole of the second week of August the wind had blown from the direction of south-southwest with considerable force..."[110] Suddenly, about midnight on 14 August, the wind changed to the dangerous direction of northeast and soon blew to hurricane strength. The winds blasted the crops in the fields and the small houses of the English settlers.

On the shoreline, the winds and storm surge took the waters to heights that none had ever seen before. Boston suffered through two high tides of twenty feet and "[t]he Narragansett Indians were obliged to climb into the tops of trees to save themselves from the great tide in their region. Many of them failed to do so, and were swallowed up by the surging waters..."[110]

The storm lasted the 5 or 6 hours such hurricanes do and when the storm at last had passed, the settlers who could do so emerged to a changed world. Crops were flattened. Some houses had lost their roofs or were blown down completely. Most incredibly to the colonial senses, entire swathes of trees were snapped in two or blown down completely.

Several ships were lost off the coast of New England, but the most celebrated was the Angel Gabriel - a bark of some 240 tons and 12-16 cannon (depending upon the source of information). From the letters of "John Aubrey, the celebrated antiquary of Wiltshire" the Angel Gabriel was originally built by Sir Charles Snell for Sir Walter Raleigh, "for the designe for Guiana, which cost him the manor of Yatton Regnell, the farm of Easton Piers, Thornhill, and the Church-lease of Bp. Cannins, which ship upon Sir Walter Raleigh's attander was forfeited." [Aubrey's Letters; Vol. 2, p. 514; Mss.; Bodleian Library; Oxford, England]

A wonderful account of the voyage of the Angel Gabriel and its sailing partner the James (and the storm which befell them) comes in excerpts from the Journal of The Reverend Richard Mather, who was traveling on the James. The two ships sailed together for a great deal of the voyage. Based upon the several different sources for excerpts for this journal, the journey unfolded as written below. The voyage itself took 12 weeks and 2 days, from the time they left King's Road in Bristol on 23 May 1635 until the James landed in Boston, MA on 17 August 1635. [Mather]

23 May 1635: The Angel Gabriel, Captain Andrews, Master; the James (220 tons), Captain Taylor, Master; the Mary (80 tons), the Bess (or Elizabeth) and the Diligence (150 tons) left King's Road, Bristol, England en route for New England and Newfoundland. [MaryJohn]

24 May to 2 June 1635: They then lay at anchor for these 11 days before departing. [Mather]

27 May 1635: "...While at anchor, Captain Taylor, Mr. Maud, Nathaniel Wale, Barnabas Fower, Thomas Armitage, and myself, Richard Mather went aboard the Angel Gabriel. When we came there we found diverse passengers, and among them some loving and godly Christians that were glad to see us. The next day the visit was returned..."[Mather]

Thursday, 4 June 1635: "...the wind serving us, wee set sayle and began our sea voyage with glad hearts, yt God had loosed us from our long stay wherein we had been holden, and with hope and trust that Hee would graciously guide us to the end of our journey..." Meanwhile, the Angel Gabriel had an omen of things to come: "...And even at our setting out we yt were in the James had experience of God's gracious providence over us, in yt the Angel Gabriel haling home one of her ancres, had like, being carried by the force of the tide, to have fallen foule upon ye forept of our ship, w&ch made all the mariners as well as passengers greatly afraid, yet by guidance of God and his care over us, she passed by without touching so much as a cable or a cord, and so we escaped yt danger..." [Mather]

4 to 6 June 1635: The ships spent three full days tacking between King's Road and Lundy [Mather] Island, which lies only 10 miles out in the Bristol Channel [LonelyPlanet].
6 to 9 June1635: The ships lay at anchor at Lundy Island for three more days, stuck there by "adverse seas and wind". [Mather]

9 June 1635: It only took this one day to sail from Lundy Island to Milford Haven, Pembroke co., Wales. [Mather]

10 to 22 June 1635: However, once at Milford Haven, they lay at anchor there for another 12 days - due first to rough seas and then to a lack of wind. While Mather and the other passengers chafed at the constant delays, "the day was more comfortable to us all in regard to ye company of many godly Christians from ye Angel Gabriel, and from other vessels lyin in the haven with us, who, wanting means and home, were glad to come to us, and we were also glad of their company, and had all of us a very comfortable day, and were much refreshed in the Lord." [Mather]

Sunday, 14 June 1635: "...Still lying at Milford Haven. Mr. Maud, Mathews Michael of the James and many of the passengers of the Angel Gabriel went to church on shore at a place called Nangle, where they heard two comportable sermons made by an ancient grave minister living at Pembroke, whose name is Mr. Jessop. Ps XCI-11 "For He shall give his angels charge over Thee to keep Thee in all thy ways..." [Mather]

Monday, 22 June 1635: The small fleet finally sets sail from the English coast, bound for America. This was the last sight of land for many weeks and the last sight of home for nearly all the emigrants.

23 June 1635: The Master of the James decided to stay with the Angel Gabriel, since both ships were bound for New England and not Newfoundland. They quickly lost sight of the smaller, faster Mary, Bess and Diligence on the evening of the 23rd. Mather's thoughts on the Angel Gabriel were: "...The Angel Gabriel is a strong ship and well furnished with fourteene or sixteene pieces of ordnance, and therfore oure seamen rather desired her company; but yet she is slow in sailing, and therefore wee went sometimes with trhee sayles less than wee might have done, yt , so we might not overgoe her..." [Mather]

Wednesday, 24 June 1635: "...We saw abundance of porpuyses leaping and playing about our ship". And wee spent some time that day in pursuing with the Angel Gabriel what wee supposed was a Turkish pirate, but could not overtake her..." [Mather]

Monday, 29 June 1635: The seamen decided to kill one of the porpoises for sport. They had originally planned upon killing it on 28 June, but that day was the Sabbath. Out of respect for the passengers' faith, they waited until the following day. Mather's description of this follows: "...The seeing him haled into the ship like a swyne from ye stye to the tressele, and opened upon ye decke in viewe of all our company, was wonderful to us all, and marvellous merry sport and delightful to our women and children. So good was our God unto us in affordin us the day before, spiritual refreshing to our soules, and ye day morning also delightful recreation to our bodyes, at ye taking and opening of ye huge and strange fish..." [Mather]

That afternoon, Captain Taylor, The Reverend Mather and Matthew Mitchell went aboard the Angel Gabriel. "...They found much sickness aboard and two cases of small pox, but the latter were recovered. They had supper with the ship's master and had good cheese, boiled mutton, roasted turkey and good sack..." [MaryJohn]

Saturday, 4 July 1635: "...This day ye sea was very rough...Some were very seasicke, but none could stand or go upon ye decke because of the tossing and tumbling of the ship...This day (July 4) we lost sight of the Angel sayling slowly behind us, and we never saw her again any more..." [Mather]

Sunday, 2 August 1635: "...And ye wind blew with a coole and comfortable gale at south all day, which carried us away with great speed towards or journeyes end..." [Mather]

3 August 1635: "...But lest wee should grow secure and neglect ye Lord through abundance of prosperity, or wise and loving God was pleased on Monday morning about three of ye clock, when wee were upon the coast of land, to exercise us with a sore storme and tempest of wind and rain, so yt many of us passengers with wind and rain were raised out of our beds, and our seamen were forced to let down all ye sayles, and ye ship was so tossed with fearfull mountains and valleys of water, as if wee should have beene overwhelmed and swallowed up. But ye lasted not long, for at or poore prayers, ye Lord was please to magnify his mercy in assuaging ye winds and seas againe about sun rising..." [Mather]

8 August 1635: The James makes land at Menhiggin [possibly Monhegan, ME?] [Mather]

14 August 1635: At 10 o'clock at night they dropped anchor at the Isle of Shoales and there "slept sweetly the night until daybreak". [Mather]

15 August 1635: The Great Storm hits. The James is anchored off the Isles of Shoals, the Angel Gabriel off Pemaquid, ME. Mather's description of the storm: "...ye Lord sent Forth a most terrible Storme of rain, and ye Angel Gabriel lying in at anchor at Pemaquid, was burst in pieces, and cast away in ye Storme and most of ye cattle and other goodes with one seaman and three or four passengers did also perish therein, besides two of ye passengers died by ye way. Ye rest having lives given ym. ' The Angel Gabriel was the only vessel which miscarried with passengers from Old England to New, so signally did the Lord in his Providence watch over the Plantation of New England."

Perley gives an excellent account of how the James survived the hurricane: "...The ship James...was near the Isles of Shoals when the gale came on. The vessel was tun into a strait among the islands, the master thinking probably that he had secured a harbor; but when well in he found that it was an unprotected passage. The anchors were lowered, and all three of them were lost, the violent and almost irresistible wind snapping the cables and leaving the anchors at the bottom of the deep. The Bessel was then placed under sail and run before the northeast gale, but neither canvas nor ropes held, and she dashed through the foaming crests on toward the rocky shore of Piscataqua. Instant destruction seemed inevitable. But, lo! As if a mighty overruling hand controlled the angry elements, when within a cable's length of the ledges, the wind suddenly veered to the northwest, and the ship was blown away from the deadly rocks back toward the islands again...they were plowing along toward rocks as dangerous as those they had just escaped. When about the strike in a last fatal plunge a part of the mainsail was let out, which caused the vessel to veer a little, and she weathered the rocks, almost touching them as she plunged past. The desired harbor was finally reached in safety..." [Perley]

Mather records that the reaction of the passengers to this stroke of fortune was thus: "...When news was brought to us in the gun room that the danger was past, oh how our hearts did then relent and melt within us! And how we burst into tears of joy amongst ourselves, in love onto our gracious God, and admiration of his kindness in granting to his poor servants such an extraordinary and miraculous deliverance. His holy name be blessed forever..." [Mather]

At Pemaquid, there was no such miracle for the Angel Gabriel. She broke up on the rocks. Luckily, only 3-5 of the passengers and crew lost their lives but all who survived lost virtually everything they owned. A bark commanded by Captain Gallop made several trips, eventually conveying all the survivors to Boston, Suffolk county, Massachusetts.

16 August 1635: "...This day we went directly before the wind, and had a delight all along the coast as we went, in viewing Cape Anne, the bay of Saugust, the bay of Salem, Marblehead and other places and came to anchor at low tide at Nantasket, in a most pleasant harbor, like to such I had never seen, amongst a great many lands on everyside. After the evening exercise, when it was flowing tide again, we set sail and came the night to anchor again before Boston and so rested that night with glad and thankful hearts that God had put an end to our long journey, being 1,000 leagues, that is 3,000 English miles, over one of the greatest seas of the world. First of all it was very safe and healthful to us, for though we were in a ship with 100 passengers, besides 23 seamen, 23 cows and heifers, 3 suckling calves and 8 mareas, yet not one these died by the way, neither person nor cattell, but came all alive to land, and many of the cattell in better condition than when they first entered the ship. And most of the passengers are in as good health as every and none better than my own family, and my weak wife and little Joseph as well as any other:. They had seasickness but were spared the fever, small pox and other diseases. Richard Beacon lost his right hand in the storm and one woman and her small child had scurvy, "we all conceived to be for want of walking and stirring of her body upon her bed. We had a comfortable variety of food, seeing we were not tied to the ships diet, but did victual ourselveds, we had no want of good and wholesome beer and bread, and as our land stomachs grew wearly of ship diet of salt fish and salt beef and the like, we had liberty to change for other food which might sort better with our health and stomachs and therefore sometimes we used bacon and buttered peas, sometimes buttered bag-pudding made curraynes and raisings, and sometimes drink pottage of beer and oatmeal and sometimes water pottage well buttered..." [Mather]

17 August 1635: The James manages to make it to Boston Harbor proper with "her sails rent in sunder, and split in pieces, as if they had been rotten ragges." [Mather]

Mather summed up his trip with "On June 2 we lost sight of our old English coast, until August 8 where we made land again at Menhiggin, it was but six weeks and five days yet from our first entering the ship in King road on May 23 to our landing in Boston on August 17, it was 12 weeks and 2 days. For we lay at anchor in King Roade 11 days before we even set sail and 3 days at Lundy and 12 days at Milford and spent 3 days tacking between Kind Roade and Lundy, one day between Lundy and Milford and 8 days between Menhiggin and Boston. Again, let our gracious God be blessed forever. Amen..." [Mather]

John, Sr. took all he owned: "...several farm and household servants [one of whom was Samuel Haines], an amount of valuable furniture, farming implements, housekeeping utensils, and a considerable sum of money..." aboard the Angel Gabriel[34]. After the wreck, he and his family took to Ipswich whatever they could salvage from the water. John, Sr. lost the equivalent of £5000 sterling[15]; yet some say he salvaged nearly that much from the shipwreck[31,32,33].

Some accounts have John, Sr. and his son, John, Jr. walking from Pemaquid, Maine to Boston, Massachusetts to summon help after the hurricane. Other accounts imply that Captain Gallup's ship was already at Pemaquid, Maine and the Cogswells hired him to take them and their belongings to Ipswich, Essex county, Massachusetts.
found on ancestry.com

Biographical Sketch
BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW
Containing Life Sketches Citizens of of Leading Essex County Massachusetts
JOHN COGSWELL 1592-1669

On September 10, 1615, John Cogswell married Elizabeth, daughter of the Rev. William and Phillis Thompson; and in May, 1635, he with his family sailed for America on board the "Angel Gabriel," commanded by Captain Andrews. The ship, which was wrecked on the coast of Maine in August, 1635, brought other passengers, who settled in Essex; and among them were John and Thomas Burnham, ancestors of the Burnham family of this town. John Cogswell settled in Essex, and engaged in the manufacture of woollen cloth. He owned three hundred and seventy-five acres of land; and the family homestead, where eight generations have resided, is a part of his original tract. He died November 29, 1669; and his wife died June 2, i6676.

Their children were as follows: a daughter who married in England and lived in London; Mary, who in 1649 married Godfrey Armitage; William, who was born in England in 1619; John, born in 1622; Hannah, who in 1652 married Deacon Waldo; Abigail, who married Thomas Clark; Edward, born in 1629; Sarah, who married Simeon Tuttle, and died in 1692; and Elizabeth, who on July 31, 1657, wedded Nathaniel Masterson.
found on ancestry.com

John Cogswell coming to America
Cogswell derives its name from the town of Coggeshall, Essex, England. It was a Roman town named Canonium, then called Coed Garr's Hall under the Saxons, then Coggeshael under Canute the Dane and finally Coggeshall. Edward Coggswell was a wool merchant. He passed this on to John Sr. John sold his inhereted property and moved his family to New Englan in 1635. He married Elizabeth the daughter of the parish vicar Rev William Thompson. They left on in 22 Jun 1635 from Bristol with 4 other ships, the James , the Bess, the Mary, the Diligence, and John's ship the Angel Gabriel a 220 ton vessel with 12 cannons built by Sir Charles Snell origin-ally for Sir Walter Raliegh. Only the Angel Gabriel and the James went to New England the rest went somewhere else. They anchored off Maine in Aug of 1635, the James off Isle of Shoals and the Angel Gabriel off Pemaquid Me. A nor-easter came up on 15 Aug 1635 that wrecked the Angel Gabriel. John was able to salvage almost 5,000 pounds sterling of his property. The storm did considerable dammage to crops and buildings in the area. They settled in what is now Ipswich Ma. They arrived in Boston on 17 Aug 1635. John bought 300 acres on the Chebacco River and continued on being a wool merchant. He was also a town leader. He and his wife are buried at the old cemetery on Rt 133 in Ipswich next to the White Elephant Antique Shop.
found on ancestry.com

John Cogswell, (Princess Dianna Spencer's 10th great-grandfather, making her my 10th cousin once removed.)
John Cogswell, son of Edward, was born in 1592 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. At age 23, he succeeded to his fathers' business and settled down in the old homestead. On September 10, 1615 in Westbury Leigh, Wilts, John married Elizabeth Thompson. She was born about 1594 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. His parents died soon after his marriage, and he received his inheritance, "The Mylls called Ripond, situate within the Parish of Frome Selwood," together with the home place and certain personal property.

Like his father, he was a manufacturer of wollen fabrics, largely broadcloths and kerseymeres. The superior quality of these manufacturers gave his "mylls" a favorable reputation, which appears to have been retained to the present day. There are factories occupying much the same locations and still owned by the Cogswells, which continue to put on the market wollen cloths that in Vienna and elsewhere have commanded the first premium in the world exhibitions of our times (1880s?). John Cogswell doubtless found, in London, a market for his manufactures. He may have had a commission house in that city, which would account for his being called, as he sometimes has been, a London merchant. John Cogswell immigrated to the Massachusetts Colony on the ship "Angel Gabriel" from Bristol, England May 23, 1635. He brought his wife and 8 children with him, leaving one daughter in England. He brought his apprentice of 9 years, Samuel Haines, with him on the voyage which lasted 10 weeks. (See below.)

John Cogswell was the third original settler of Ipswich, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Mr. John Cogswell had lands granted him there as appears from the records; under the date of 1635. The fact that he was designated "Mr." at that date, and the considerable amount of land granted him indicate that he was a man of good social standing in society. The records of about that date further show that Cornelius Waldo was Mr. Coggswell's farmer. He was made Freeman there March 3, 1636. On March 26, 1641, John Cogswell of Ipswich mortgaged to Mr. William Hubbard his farm of about 300 acres at Chebacco River, with the houses; acknowledged April 5, 1641, before Richard Saltonstall.

The Cogswells were also involved in an attempt to prevent the execution of Goodwife Proctor in the Salem witch trials. "Five members of the Cogswell family were among the twenty prominent people who signed the petition drawn up by the Rev. John Wise on behalf of Goodwife Proctor, who stood accused of witchcraft. Mary Warren alleged that she had been threatened and abused by Goodwife proctor, and that she had seen apparitions of people who had long since been murdered by the wife of John Proctor. This evidence prevailed and the good woman was sentenced to death."

John Cogswell died on November 29, 1669 at Ipswich, Massachusetts. He is buried at the Phipps Street Burying Ground in Ipswich, Massachusetts. Elzabeth Cogswell died on June 2, 1676 at Ipswich, MassachusettsA. She is also buried in Old North Graveyard, Ipswich, Massachusetts.

The "Haines Family," by W.L. Holman, 1962, tells the story of Samuel Haines, John Cogswell's apprentice who came with John and his family when they immigrated: "At the age of 15, Samuel was apprenticed to John Cogswell, in Westbury, County, Wilts, a fuller or clothmaker, for 10 years. In 1635, Cogswell came to New England on the "Angel Gabriel," from Kings Road, Bristol, 4 June, and from Milford Haaven, 22 June, and with him came his apprentice. After a voyage of 10 weeks, the ship foundered off the coast of Maine in a bad storm, but most passengers managed to get ashore, and were brought up to Boston, Massachusetts, in Goodman Gallup's Bark. From Boston, Gallup sailed cogswell and his party to Ipswich, Massachusetts, and here in Ipswich, Haines lived for a year and then went up to Northam (later Dover, New Hampshire)."

In 1676, age about 65, Samuel Haines testified in litigation between the Cogswells about property brought over on the ill-fatedship..."The desposition of Samuell Haines Sen aged 65 years or thereabouts. This deponent testifyeth and saith, that I lived with Mr John Cogswell, Sen.: in old England about nine years a servant with him, and came over along with him to news England in the ship (called the Angell Gabriell) and were present wih him when my master Cogswell suffered shipwrecke at Pemmyquid, which was about fourty-one yeares agoe the last August when the ship were cast away. I the said Haines doe remember that there were saved then out of my maisters good a Good Quantity of Good Household goods both feather beds and Bedding and also a good quantity of brass and Pewter and also severall Brass pans. Furthermore I Doe Remember that my maister had a turkey worked Carpett in old England which he commonly used to lay upon his parlour table, and this carpet was put aboard amongst my maisters goods and Came safe ashore to the Best of my Remembrance. All which goods together with some provisions wich were saved when Goodman Galhup of Boston Brought to Ipswitch in his barke for my master (Except some of them wich the vessel Could not hold) and I the said Deponent came along with him in the vessel from Pemmyquid, and lived with my maister Cogswell in Ipswitch the same yeare following. And also I Remember that my maister had two maires and two Cowes who were shipt aboarde a ship at South Hampton In old England and came safe ashore to new England that same summer as we came here, and were delivered to my maister; I Doe further testifye that about 4 yeare and a half after)) I brought over for the use of my maister Cogswell between fourscore and an hundredth pounds worth of goods, in severall particulars which were delivered to him. And Furthermore I doe very well remember that my marster Cogswell had three sonses name were William wich were about 14 years of age then, and the second sonne were called John wich were about twelve years of age then, and the third sonnes name was Edward wich were about six years of age at that time and further saith not." Samuel Haines, Senr came and made oath to all ye above written the fist of December 1676. Before me Richard Martyn Commissr"

Another deposition in the suit is printed in the NEHGS "Register," Vol 23, pg. 154, reproduced from Paper No. 554, Vol. 39, "Massachusetts Judicial "Records," Cogswell vs. Cogswell: "Deposition of William Thompson aged about 28 years testifieth that I lived with my uncle and aunt Mr. John Cogswell, Senior of Ipswich, and Mrs. Cogswell about 16 years, and I did frequently see a turkie work carpet which they had, and I have heard them say that it was theirs in Old England and used to lie upon their parlour table there, and that they brought it with them into this country when they came, and being this last winter in Old England I heard my father Doctor Samuel Thompson say that he did well remember that my uncle and aunt had a turkie work carpett weh used to lye upon their parlour table in Old England, and took it away with them. 26 May 1677.

"The deposition of another apprentice of John Cogswell, William Furber, Sr., age about 62, collaborated Haines' testimony and other depositions were presented. The case is called William Cogswell vs. John Cogswell of Ipswich, 22 Mar. 1677, Massachusetts Archives, 39: 534-535. The Winthrop Papers and Mather's Journal contains details regarding the shipwreck of the "Angel Gabriel"

Other Sources:
"Ancestry of Bob and Mary Beth Wheeler" at www.ancestry.com.
"Ipswich Court Records and Files," in the "Essex Antiquarian," Vol 8, 1904, p. 3.
"Ipswich In The Massachusetts Bay Colony", by Thomas Franklin Waters, The Ipswich Historical Society, 1905; pgs. 290-291.
"History of Hancock"; Tuttle in History of Hancock , from http://members.aol.com/_ht_a/dcurtin1/gene/gen_cog.htm
"Stories, Publications, and Memories", at http://www.ancestry.com/
found on ancestry.com

John(3) Cogswell was the immigrant ancestor in this Cogswell line. He was born in 1592 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. He was baptized on April 7, 1592. He died on November 29, 1669 at Ipswich, Massachusetts. He is buried in Old North Graveyard, Ipswich, Massachusetts. On September 10, 1615 in Westbury Leigh, Wilts, John married Elizabeth Thompson. She was born circa 1594 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. She died on June 2, 1676 at Ipswich, Massachusetts. She is also buried in Old North Graveyard, Ipswich, Massachusetts.

At age 23, he succeeded to his fathers' business and settled down in the old homestead. His parents died soon after his marriage, and he received his inheritance, "The Mylls called Ripond, situate within the Parish of Frome Selwood," together with the home place and certain personal property. Like his father, he was a manufacturer of wollen fabrics, largely broadcloths and kerseymeres. The superior quality of these manufacturers gave his "mylls" a favorable reputation, which appears to have been retained to the present day. There are factories occupying much the same locations and still owned by the Cogswells, which continue to put on the market wollen cloths that in Vienna and elsewhere have commanded the first premium in the world exhibitions of our times (1880s?).

John Cogswell doubtless found, in London, a market for his manufactures. He may have had a commission house in that city, which would account for his being called, as he sometimes has been, a London merchant.

Mrs. Cogswells' mother was Phillis--- and her father was the Rev. William Thompson, vicar of Westbury from 1603 to his death in 1623. About twenty years after their marriage, with a family of nine children about them, and having the accumulations of a prosperous business, Mr. and Mrs. Cogswell determined to emigrate to America. The particular reasons which led them to leave England may have been much the same that influenced others in their times. It appears that early in 1635, Mr. Cogswell made sale of his "mylls" and other real estate, and soon after, with his wife, eight children, and all their personal effects, embarked at Bristol, May 23, 1635, for New England. Their passage was long and disastrous. Their arrival in America was after a most unexpected fashion. Having reached the shores of New England, they were landed unceremoniously at a place called Pemaquid, in Maine, being washed ashore from the broken decks of their ship "Angel Gabriel " which went to pieces in the frightful gale of August 15, 1635, when such a "sudden dismal storm of wind and rain came as had never been known before by white man or Indian." Traces of this storm remained for years.

John Cogswell and his wife Elizabeth settled at Ipswich, and had lands granted him there as appears from the records; under the date of 1635, is this entry:

"Granted to Mr. John Cogswell three hundred acres of land at the further Chebacco, Having the river on the southeast, the land of Will White on ye Northwest and a Creek Coming out of the river towards Will Whites farme on the Northeast. Bounded also on the west with a creek and a little brooke. Also there was granted to him a percell of ground containing eight acres, upon part whereof the said John Coggswell hath Built an house, it being in ye corner lott in Bridge Streete and has goodman Bradstreet houselott on ye s.e. The was also granted to him six acres of Ground late mr. John Spencers. Butting upon the river on the southeast having a lott of Edmund Gardners' on the Northeast and a lott of Edmund Saywords on the Southwest wch six acres of ground teh sd John Coggswell hath sold to John Perkins teh younger his heirs and assigns."

The fact that he was designated "Mr." at that date, and the considerable amount of land granted him indicate that he was a man of good social standing in society. The records of about that date further show that Cornelius Waldo was Mr. Coggswell's farmer.

The Cogswells were also involved in an attempt to prevent the execution of Goodwife Proctor in the Salem witch trials. According to Ipswich In The Massachusetts Bay Colony, 290-291, by Thomas Franklin Waters, The Ipswich Historical Society, 1905: "Five members of the Cogswell family were among the twenty prominent people who signed the petition drawn up by the Rev. John Wise on behalf of Goodwife Proctor, who stood accused of witchcraft. Mary Warren alleged that she had been threatened and abused by Goodwife proctor, and that she had seen apparitions of people who had long since been murdered by the wife of John Proctor. This evidence prevailed and the good woman was sentenced to death."

Mrs. Cogswell survived her husband but a few years. She was a woman of sterling qualities and dearly loved by all who knew her. Side by side in the old churchyard in Ipswich have slept for more than three hundred years, the mortal remains of this godly pair, whose childhood was passed near the banks of the river Avon; who leaving behind the tender associations of the Old World, came with their children to aid in rearing on these shores a pure Christian state. They did greater work than they knew, died in the faith of the Gospel, and while their graves are unmarked by monument of stone, their souls are safe in heaven, their memory blessed, and their names honored by a posterity in numbers second only to that of Abraham.

John and Elizabeth Cogswell had the following children:-

daughter(4); she married, lived in London, and was the only child of John Cogswell who did not come to America
Mary(4); born circa 1617 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; died in Boston, Massachusetts.
William(4); born 1619
John(4); born 1622
Phyllis(4); Baptized July 1624; probably died young.
Hannah(4); born circa 1624
Abigail(4); born circa 1626
Edward(4); born 1629, in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England.
Alice(4); baptized 1632; she probably died young
Ruth(4); baptized 1633; she probably died young
Sarah Cogswell; born circa 1632.
Elizabeth; born 1635

3.William(4); born 1619, in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Baptized, 1619 in Westbury Parish Church. died December 15, 1700

4. John(4); born 1622, in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Baptized, July 25, 1622 in Westbury Parish Church.

6. Hannah(4) born circa 1624, in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Baptized, April 26, 1626 in Westbury Parish Church. died December 25, 1704 in Charleston, Massachusetts. Buried in Phipps Street burying ground, Charlestown, Massachusetts.

7. Abigail(4) born circa 1626, in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Baptized, 1627. Died in Ipswich, Massachusetts. Married Thomas Clarke circa 1646. Child:- 11. Sarah Cogswell(4)born circa 1632; married Simon Tuttle in 1663.

12. Elizabeth(4); born 1635, in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England.
found on ancestry.com

Ipswich Property
Excerpt from Genealogy on Robert Andrews:

John Cogswell, mentioned, settled at Ipswich, and had lands granted him there as appears from the records; under the date of 1635, is this entry:

Granted to Mr. John Cogswell three hundred acres of land at the further Chebacco, hauing the River on the southeast, the land of Willm White on ye Northwest and a Creek Coming out of the Riuer towards willm whites farme on the northeast. Bounded also on the west with a creeke and a little brooke. Also there was granted to him a percell of ground containing eight acres, upon part whereof the said John Coggswell hath Built an house, it being in ye corner lott in Bridge Streete and has goodman Bradstreete houselott on ye s.e.

The was also granted to him six acres of Ground late mr. John Spencers, Butting vpon the river on the south east haueing a lott of Edmund Gardners on the north east and a lott of Edmund Saywords on the south west wch six acres of ground the sd John Coggswell hath sold to John Perkins the younger his heirs and assigns.

The fact that he was designated "Mr." at that date, and the considerable amount of land granted him indicate that he was a man of good social standing in society.

The records of about that date further show that Cornelius Waldo was Mr. Coggswell's farmer.
found on ancestry.com