Saturday, May 21, 2011

DOROTHY BIRD (LORD) 1588-1676

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of William Elmer, son of John Elmer, son of Mary Kibbe (Elmer), daughter of Daniel Kibbe, son of Hannah Kelsey (Kibbe), daughter of Hannah Ingersol (Kelsey), daughter of Dorothy Lord (Ingersol) daughter of Dorothy Bird (Lord).]

ALSO ON MILLER-AANDERSON.BLOGSPOT.COM

Grave marker for Dorothy Bird Lord (1588-1676) and husband, Thomas Lord, at Ancient Burying Ground, Hartford, Connecticut.


Marion Avenue corner of Nutmeg Drive, Southington, Connecticut


Birth: 1588, England
Death: August 2, 1676, Hartford County, Connecticut, USA
She was born in Towcester, Northampton, England, and baptized at St. Lawrence Church, May 25, 1588. She left England with her husband, Thomas Lord, and most of their children, April 1635. They settled in Hartford, Connecticut, by 1639.
Burial: Merriman Burying Ground, Southington, Hartford County, Connecticut, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 5125280

found on findagrave.com



"Dorothy his wife born 1588 died 1676"


Immigration/Founding of Connecticut
Thomas and Dorothy Bird Lord along with their seven children sailed from London to Boston on the ship "Elizabeth and Ann" on 29 April 1635. They lived in Boston/Cambridge for about a year before joining up with "Hookers Party" and settling Hartford, Connecticut in 1636. They were the original settlers of Hartford and there are monuments with the Lord family names.


Dorothy BIRD Lord HS 1588-1676
27 June 2008, Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut

Headstone Details
Cemetery name: Ancient Burying Ground
Name on headstone: Dorothy Lord
Birth 1588 - Townchester, Northampton, England
Death 1676 - Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut

Dorothy Lord's Will
"In the Name of God Amen, I Dorothy Lord of Hartford in the colony of Connecticutt in New England, Being stricken in yeares, &at present laboring under some bodyly weaknesses; Though through the mercy of God, I at present haue ye use of my understanding and memorye, yet I know not how suddenly the Lord may put an end unto my fewe dayes in this life, and therefore according to my duty I am willing soe to setle and disspose of that little estate the Lord hath lent me, that peace may be continued amongst my children when I am gathered to my fathers, and In order therunto I doe declare this as followeth to be my last will and Testament. First that all my just debt be pd out of my estate.

I doe giue and Bequeath my now dwelling house and Barne and my Home lott and my lower lott in the North meadow unto the children of my son Thomas Lord deceased, at the age of 18 years and if any decease before they attayne that age the suruiuor or suruiuors to posses it, and if they all dye then my son William or his children to possess what is giuen to them.

"Itt: I giue unto my daughter Amy Gilbert and her children Three Acres of Meadow or Swamp in my upper lott in the Long meadow next to that Mrs. Olcott hath now in possesion,

"Itt I giue unto my son Robt: Lord (If he live after my decease so long as to have Notice of this my will) Three Acres of my upper lott adjoyneing to that which I haue giuen my Daughter Gilbert.

"Itt I giue unto my son William Lord and his heires foreuer Two Acres in my great lott in the long Meadow next adjoyneing to that which I haue giuen my son Robert.

"Itt I giue unto my son John Lord Tenn pounds in Currant pay of the country.

"Itt Whereas my Grandson Richard: Lord hath disbursed seuerall sums of money or country pay for the Building my vhimneys and shingling my house and repayres about it, I doe for the payment of him, giue grant and confirme unto him and his heires foreuer: all that my meadow lott in the long meadow which abutts upon the great Riuer east the little river west Mr. Westwoods land North and Barth Barnards land south.

"I doe also giue and bequeath undo my sd Grandson Richard Lord and his heires foreuer all the remaynder of my upper lott in the long meadow, which I haue not given to my sons Robert and son William; and my daughter Gilbert and her children, he payeing this legacie hereafter exprest, to my sonn John Tenn pounds. And in case my sonn Robt: shall depart this life before he hath noticed of my last will, Then that Three Acres of Land giuen to him shall be diuided Between my Son William and my Grandson Richard Lord, I doe allso confirme unto my Grandson: Richard Lord and his heires all my wood land that is all ready layd out or to be layed unto me wth in the Bounds of Hartford.

"I giue unto my Grandchild Hanna Ingersall my youngest cowe and my other cowe I giue unto my Grandchildren Dorathy and Margery Ingersall.

"I giue my moueable estate and Cattell to my son William Lord and my Grandson Richard Lord my daughter Stanton my daughter Gilbert and the children ofmy daughter Ingersall, the whole to be divided into fiue partes, and my daughter Ingersalls children to have one part, and the rest of them, earch of them one part.

"I giue unto the wife of Nocholas Clarke Tenn shillings.

"I doe ordayn and consitite my son William and my grandson Richard: my executores, and disire my louing Friend Mr. John Allyn to be ouere seer of this my will, and for the confirmation herof I have hereunto sett my hand this 8th of Febuary: 1669:

Sighned in precence of us
John Allyn
Steuen Hopkins
Dorathy Lord (her marke)

After the general distribution by the Will, a supplimentary disposal of special articles was ordered by Dorothy Lord, as follows, in abstract:

To Richard Lord's wife her iron dripping-pan and great pewter pi-plate; to Richard Lord, Jr. her great brass pot. To Mrs. Haynes one pair of her best sheets, two napkins, a pewter pie-plate (the smaller one) and a pewter candle-stick. To her daughter Stanton her great brass pan and her great Bible. To her son William Lord "my Siluer drinking-Bowle" and her great brass kettle. To her daughter Gilbert her smaller brass pan, a brass skimmer, a brass chafing dish and two "Joynt- Stooles." To Elizabeth Gilbert a great pewter platter. To her widowed daughter Lord (widow of Thomas) the bed she lay on, a feather bolster and a brass skillet. To Dorothy Phelps her coverlet, a feather pillow and a "beere" (pillow-case). To Margery Ingersoll a white blanket and a pillow. To Hannah Kelsy her hood, scarf and hat, a great white chest, a feather-bed, two blankets, a bolster, two pillows, two pair of curtains and curtain rods, a brass candle-stick and all her earthen ware. To the children of her son Thomas all teh fire utensils in her house, a table, "forme" and chairs. To Mary Lord Jr. (daughter of her son Thomas) her bedset. To Margery Ingersoll 20 shillings; to her sister Dorothy Ingersoll 20 shillings- if remaining after all her debts and funeral expenses are paid.

These articles were inverntoried at L187.17.8 The large number of brass and pewter article, the linen, curtains, etc. select for these special gifts, indicated a handsome style of living for the time.
Dorothy Bird Lord sealed her will with arms of "Lord alias Laward" family (Argent on a fess gules between three cinquefoils azure, a hind passant between two pheons or). The crest on the seal is a demi-hind issuant, and not a demi-bird with wings expanded as givin on the Salisbury Chart, and this is confirmed by the statement of the Committee on Heraldry in the New England Genealogical Register, Vol. 86 (1932) page 270.
found on ancestry.com

Biography
Before she even left England, Dorathy Lord could credit herself with great accomplishment in that she had 8 surviving children in an age when infant mortality was a constant threat. And by the end of her life in 1675, she could take credit for achieving - at age 87 - a life span remarkable even now, 400 years later, with advanced health care, medical technology and comfortable living conditions. Much more so then, having spent the last 40 years of her life on the American frontier. She spent the first half of her life in Towcester, being born there in May of 1588.

We might know as little of Dorathy as we do of her husband, who she outlived by at least a quarter century, except for her will written in February 1669 (new date 1670). She is mentioned only once in the Colonial records prior to her death, and that in May of 1663, the reading of which suggests her husband is already dead by then. Certainly the Court was not expecting Dorathy, at 75 years of age, to go fix the fences herself, as "rail-splitting" for the common "snake" or "worm" fences used in periods of initial settlement was heavy labor, even for grown men But the fact that the court is addressing this issue to Dorathy, not her husband, proves that Thomas, Sr. was deceased by this date. Some 19th century sources claim he "died early "But clearly Dorathy outlived him by a number of years.

Tragically, by living to 1675, Dorathy also outlived her two oldest sons, Richard who died in 1662 and Thomas, Jr. who died in 1667. She also outlived her two youngest sons - John, who died c. 1668 and Robert who died c. 1673. She names her eldest living son William, and her grandson by her deceased son Richard, also named Richard, as executors of her will, confirming her husband Thomas, her eldest son Richard and her next oldest son Thomas, Jr. were all dead by late winter of 1669-1670.

As each of her children had their own heirs, we may assume that the properties described in her will of 1669-70 were those also of her husband, Thomas Lord, Sr., and passed directly to her as his survivor, although one early source suggests Thomas died intestate and what Dorathy describes is only her "widow's share". We have no way of knowing. The properties she does describe included:

"...my now dwelling house and Barn, and my Home lott..."

Left to the children of her late son Thomas, Jr. and presumed to be the house lot assigned to her husband in 1636.

"...my lower lott in the North meadow..."

Also left to the children of her late son Thomas, Jr.

"Three acres of Meadow or swamp in my uper lott in the long meadow next to that Mrs. Olcott hath now in possession."

Left to her daughter Amy, now married to Corporal John Gilbert.

"Three acres of my upper lott adjoyneing to that which I have given my daughter Gilbert."

Left to her son Robert.

"Two acres in my Great lott in the long meadow next adjoyneing to that which I have given my son Robert."

Left to her son William.

At this point Dorathy has split her "upper lott" into three 3-acre parcels, and she leaves the remainder of that property (acreage unknown but probably not less than 3 acres) to her grandson, Richard. as well as an apparently large parcel of meadow between the Connecticut River and Little River (see map here). And to her grandson Richard she also leaves an area of "wood land that is allready layd out or to be layd unto me within the Bounds of Hartford." (See complete text below.)

Clearly, her grandson Richard was a favorite of hers. She lavished property on him and appointed him executor of her estate. But that was not merely because he was first born of her first born Richard, who had died six years earlier. Richard Lord, Jr. was one of the leading figures in Colonial Connecticut at that time, as the histories record. His name appears frequently in the Colonial Records in legal matters of all kinds, listed often as a supervisor of wills in the 1650s, and was clearly seen as one of the leaders of the Colony. found on ancestry.com

From the Society of the Descendants of the Founders of Hartford
Thomas Lord, smith, embarked April 19, 1635, in the “Elizabeth and Ann,” at London, aged 50, with wife Dorothy, aged 46.-Children: Thomas (l6), Ann (14), William (12), John (10), Robert (9), Aymie (6), Dorothy (4), in same ship with Clement Chaplin, William Swayne, and others. He was an original proprietor at Hartford, and his homelot in 1639 was on the highway on the bank of the Little River, now Wells St. He married about 1610, Dorothy. The time of his death is unknown. Mrs. Dorothy Lord died in 1676, aged 87. Her will, executed February 8, 1669-70, is sealed with the above coat of arms.


Children:


i. Richard, born about 1611.



ii. Thomas, born 1619.


iii. Ann, born 1621; married Thomas Stanton, of Hartford, afterward THE Lord ARMS. of Stonington, about 1637; died in 1688.


iv. William, born 1623; removed to that part of ancient Saybrook now called Lyme; married; died May 17, 1678.


v. John, born 1625; married (1) Rebecca, daughter of Francis Bushnell, of Guilford, who died before 1647; (2) May 15, 1648, Adrean Basey, of Hartford, probably a sister of John Baysey; he abandoned his wife, and in September, 1651, the General Court ordered the Townsmen of Hartford to require of John Lord the wearing apparel of his wife and a bed "for her to lodge on." He probably had fled to Virginia; Porter (p. 11) prints a letter, dated at Apomatixe (Appomattox), February 20, 1663-4, from him to his nephew, Richard Lord, promising to pay his debts if the next season was favorable to tobacco. October 17, 1648, John Lord, Taylor, was bound over to good behavior, his brother, Thomas Lord, giving bonds for him.


vi. Robert, born 1627; he was a sea-captain, supposed to have been living in 1670, and to have died abroad after that year univ.


vii. Amy, born 1629; married May 6, 1647, John Gilbert (q. v.), of Hartford; died January 8, 1691.


viii. Dorothy, born 1631; married about 1651, John Ingersoll, of Hartford, afterward of Northampton, where she died January, 1657.
http://www.foundersofhartford.org/founders/lord_thomas.htm
found on ancestry.com

THOMAS LORD 1585-1678

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of William Elmer, son of John Elmer, son of Mary Kibbe (Elmer), daughter of Daniel Kibbe, son of Hannah Kelsey (Kibbe), daughter of Hannah Ingersol (Kelsey), daughter of Dorothy Lord (Ingersol), daughter of Thomas Lord.)

ALSO FOUND ON MILLER-AANDERSON.BLOGSPOT.COM

Thomas Lord headstone closeup, Hartford, Connecticut

Founders Monument


Thomas Lord headstone, Hartford, Connecticut


Monument in the Ancient Burying Ground at Hartford with the name of THOMAS LORD as an original proprietor.


Ancient Burying Ground (Center Church Graveyard), Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut





Will signature


Thomas Lord

Birth: 1585 Northamptonshire, England

Death: May 17, 1678 Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut, USA



The son of Richard and Jeane Lord of County Townchester, Northampton, England, he married first Dorothy Buckley, daughter of Edward Buckley and sister of Reverend Peter Buckley. After her death, he married Dorothy Bird 23 February 1610 in Townchester. Joseph and his second wife came from England in The "Elizabeth and Ann" to Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1635; joined Reverend Thomas Hooker's party in founding Hartford, Connecticut 1636; Thomas was an original proprietor of Hartford, Connecticut. His name is on the Founder's Monument in the Ancient Cemetery where he is buried. Thomas and Dorothy (Bird) Lord were the parents of at least nine children all being born in England.



Inscription: IN MEMORY OF MR. THOMAS LORD BORN 1585. ONE OF YE ORIGINAL PROPRIETORS OF HARTFORD

Burial: Ancient Burying Ground, Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut, USA

found on ancestry.com

Hudson-Mohawk Genealogical and family memoirs
Dr. Thomas Lord, who held the first medical license granted in the New England colonies. He came to America with Dorothy, his wife, April 29, 1635, in the ship "Elizabeth and Ann."

found on ancestry.com

Thomas and Dorothy
Thomas and Dorothy came to New England in 1633, with Reverend Thomas Hooker's party, with whom they lived at first in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and then traveled with them to what is now Hartford, Connecticut. Ancestry.com - Ancestry of Edward Wales Blake and Clarissa Matilda Glidden, pg. 47. Dorothy married Thomas 23 February 1611, at Towcester, Northhamptonshire, the license being granted at Peterboro the same day.

found on ancestry.com

Biography
Thomas Lord, wife and family, were registered 29th April, 1635, for transportation from the port of London to New England, in the ship "Elizabeth and Ann," of which Captain Robert Cooper was Master. Thomas was fifty years old, (born 1585); his wife, Dorothy, forty-six, (born 1589); and their children, Thomas, sixteen; Ann, fourteen; William, twelve; John, ten; Robert, nine; Aymie, six; Dorothy, four. (Hotten's Original Lists.)

Thomas Lord first settled at Newtown, afterward called Cambridge, Massachusetts, where his eldest son, Richard, born in 1611, had already established himself in 1632. Savage (in his Genealogical Dictionary) says that his father "perhaps had sent him to look out the most desirable place for his friends, Governor Haynes and Reverend Thomas Hooker," who came over in 1633 with "a hundred other passengers of importance to the colony." Here he remained "a year or more." But in 1636-37 this family was of that large company which was led, by Reverend Thomas Hooker, from Massachusetts, to form a new settlement on the Connecticut River. Thomas Lord thus became an original proprietor, and one of the first settlers of Hartford. He lived on the "north side," fronting Mill River, a near neighbor of Gov. Haynes, Reverend Mr. Hooker, Mr. Goodwin, Gov. Wyllys, Mr. Matthew Allyn, and others of the prominent inhabitants. His sons, Richard and Thomas, had lots next to his. That part of Hartford called Lord's Hill took its name from this family. Mr. Henry Dutch Lord, of Boston, a recognized authority, says: Thomas Lord, the first, of Hartford, was a merchant and mill owner, and that in the descriptions of the Burnham estate, Burnham mentions his half-interest in the mill with Thomas Lord. In these transactions Thomas Lord bears the prefix of "Mr." The date of his death is not known. Porter (in "Historical Notices of Hartford,") says: "he died early." The place of his burial is not known, but there is quite a number of Lord tombstones of descendants of his, in the early generations, in the rear of the First Church, of Hartford. The names of Thomas Lord and his son Richard are inscribed on the granite monument in the old grave-yard of Hartford as prominent among the first settlers. His widow, Dorothy, died in 1675 at the age of eighty-six years, and her will, dated February 8, 1669, is now on file among the Probate Records, in the office of the Secretary of State at Hartford.

There is no will recorded for Thomas Lord. His wife's will speaks of "that little estate the Lord hath lent me." Yet, besides disposing of a "dwelling house and Barn" and a "Home lott," it devises a "lower lott in the North meadow," several acres constituting an "upper lott in the long meadow," together with "wood land that is allready layd out or to be layd unto me within the Bounds of Hartford," beside "Moveable estate and Cattell," in five portions, and various household-stuff distinctive of a gentlewoman to a considerable amount, including a "silver drinking bowl." The seal which Dorothy Lord affixed to it, showing the coat of arms which "doubtless had been her husband's." The bearings correspond "exactly with those of the Laward, alias Lord, family, as given in Berry's Encyclopaedia and Burke's Armour, S. N." "Av, on a fess gu, between three cinque foils, az, a hind pass, between two pheons, or."

found on ancestry.com

DR. THOMAS LORD 1585 - 1667
Dr. Thomas Lord and his wife, Dorothy, along with their seven children, left from London for America April 29, 1635, on the ship, "Elizabeth and Ann." They were in Boston or Cambridge, Massachusetts for about a year and then joined the Hooker Party in 1636, and were among the original settlers of Hartford, Connecticut. Thomas Lord's name is on the Founder's Monument. All Descents from then to now are entitled to membership in the "Founders of Hartford."

from: www.LordFamilyGenealogy.com Our Folk Website (12/23/2008)
found on ancestry.com


Thomas and family notes
Thomas Lord was born in Towcester, Northampton, England, about 1585, and died in Hartford, Connecticut, on May 17, 1678. Dorothy Bird was born in Towcester on Saturday, May 25, 1588, and died in Hartford on August 2, 1676. They were both buried in Center Church Burying Ground, Hartford, Connecticut. They were married in Towcester on Saturday, February 23, 1610/1. She took the name Dorothy Lord. Their marriage license was recorded three days before their wedding. He is the son of Richard and Joane (_____) Lord. She is the daughter of Robert and Amy (_____) Bird. They had eight children:

i. Richard Lord was baptized in Towcester and died in New Haven Colony on May 17, 1662. Per Ron Stanton, March 2002 (e-mail address invalid as of October 2002): He arrived in America at age 24, before his father. He was a merchant and ship owner. He was Captain of the first troop of military horsemen in the colony.



ii. Anne Lord: She was born in Towcester, Northamptonshire, England, on September 18, 1614, and died in Stonington, New London County, Connecticut, in 1688.



iii. Thomas Lord was baptized in Towcester on November 15, 1616.



iv. William Lord was baptized in Towcester on December 27, 1618.



v. Robert Lord was baptized in Towcester on May 12, 1620.



vi. John Lord was baptized in Towcester on January 21, 1623/4.



vii. Amy Lord was baptized in Towcester on November 30, 1626. She married John Gilbert, son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Bennett) Gilbert, the original Gilbert immigrant family. Note: From the passenger list, her birth year should be 1628-29.


viii. Dorothy Lord was baptized in England on July 1, 1629.
found on ancestry.com

From Notes on the Founding of New England, pages 328–329:
Thomas Lord (son of Richard), born about 1585, lived at Towchester from 1610 to at least as late as 1629. In the spring of 1635 he came over to New England and soon settled in Hartford, Connecticut, where he died.

He married at Towchester, 23 February 1610/11, Dorothy Bird, born about 1589, daughter of Robert and Amy ______ Bird; she came to New England with her husband and children (except the eldest) in 1635, and died in Hartford, 2 August 1676.

[A list of their eight children and their baptism dates is given, too.]

On 29 April, 1635, the following party was added to the passenger list of the Elizabeth and Ann. It appears to be the entire Lord family plus a few others. There was another family added at the same time as a separate party. The entry was preceded by the following.

From Our Early Emigrant Ancestors ...
THESE underwritten names are to be transported to New England, imbarqued in the ELIZABETH and ANN, ROGER COOPR. Mr., the pties brought certificates from the Minister of the parish and Justices of the Peace, of their conformation to the orders and discipline of the Church of England, and that they are no subsidy men.

RICHARD GOARD 17

THO. POND 21

THO. LORD, a smith 50

ROBERT LORD 9

Uxor DOROTHY 46

AYMIE LORD 6

THOMAS LORD 16

DOROTHY LORD 4

ANN LORD 14

JOSIAS COBBET 21

WM. LORD 12

JOHN HOLLOWAY 21

JOHN LORD 10

JANE BENNET 16

JAMES COBBETT 23

WILLIAM READ 22

JOSEPH FABERR 26

WILLIAM SAMOND 19

Per Amma C. Crum, all of the children's baptisms were recorded in the Towcester Registers as children of Thomas Lorde and Dorothie his wife except the first three which were given as son (or daughter) of Thomas Lorde.

Sources:
Brainard, Homer Worthing; Gilbert, Harold Simeon; and Torrey, Clarence Almon, The Gilbert Family—Descendants of Thomas Gilbert, 1582(?)–1659 of Mt. Wollastin (Braintree), Windsor, and Wethersfield, 1953
Hotten, John Camden. Our Early Emigrant Ancestors: The Original Lists of Persons of Quality (1600–1700) Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1968 (originally published 1880 New York)
Notes on the Founding of New England, American Genealogies; found on "Early New England Settlers, 1600s–1800s"; Family Tree Maker (Brøderbund) CD#504
The Lord Family
Families of Early Hartford
Caulkins, Frances M., History of New London, Connecticut, New London, 1895
Stanton, William A., A Record, Genealogical, Biographical, Statistical, of Thomas Stanton, of Connecticut, and His Descendants, 1635–1891
Mormon family record sheet for son Thomas
Dorothy's stats are from Ancestry.com which includes no sources
copied from http://www.otal.umd.edu/~walt/gen/htmfile/2062.htm

The following was copied from http://www.renderplus.com/hartgen/htm/lord.htm#src1

Dr. Thomas Lord - was born in 1586 in Towcester, Northampton, England and died in 1667 in Hartford, Connecticut. He was the son of Richard Lord.


Dr. Thomas married Dorothy Bird on 23 February 1610/1611 in Towcester, Northampton, England. Dorothy was born on 25 May 1588 in Towcester, North Hampton, England. She was the daughter of Robert Bird. She died on 2 August 1676 in Hartford, Connecticut. (Sources: - 2)

Dr. Thomas - They with their 7 children left from London for America April 29, 1635, on the ship "Elizabeth and Ann". They were in Boston or Cambridge, Massachusetts about a year, then joined the "Hooker Party" in 1636 and were the original settlers of Hartford Connecticut. Thomas Lord's name is on the Founders Monument. All Descendants from then to now are entitled to membership in the "FOUNDERS OF HARTFORD"

found on ancestry.com

HENRY BIRDSALL 1550-1631

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of William Parker, son of John Elmer, son of Mary Kibbe (Elmer), daughter of Daniel Kibbe, son of James Kibbe, son of Rachel Cook (Kibbe), daughter of Judith Birdsall (Cook), daughter of Henry Birdsall, son of Henry Birdsall.]

Henry Birdsall History and Will

Henry, son of Henry, who made a will in 1625 in England and died in 1631, leaving things to children William, Thomas and Mary, with no mention of Henry. However, since the oldest son, named for his father, received his share when leaving for the new world in about 1628.

The Birdsall family home is thought to be near Malton, East Riding, Yorkshire, England. The first American records of Henry are from 1632 after arriving in Boston with son Nathan and daughter Judith. He was a member of the First Church of Salem. In 1643 he removed to New Haven. His will is recorded in probate records in Essex county. vol. 1, p. 123.

Sources:
Repository:
Name: Family History Library
Salt Lake City, UT 84150 USA

Title: Ancestral File (TM)
Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Publication: June 1998 (c), data as of 5 JANUARY 1998
Abbrev: Ancestral File (TM
)

Conflicting Information

The following article by Wendy Bentley appeared in the July 2006 issue of the Phineas Wolcott Cook Family Newsletter.

Henry Birdsall (Burchall) (1578-1651)

As in the case of our ancestor, Henry Cook, mystery and doubt are woven into the life history of his father-in-law. Henry Birdsall. A number of years ago the Cook Newsletter published a picture of the imposing Birdsall Mansion in Yorkshire England. Indeed there is a Henry Birdsall born in 1550 in East Riding, Yorkshire, England who has seven children born there, but none are named Henry.

The Ancestral File lists this Henry however as the father of our Henry and records that Henry Jr. (AFN:8QKF-LF) is christened in St. Stephen Parish in Norwich in 1578. Is it logical that the aristocratic Henry Birdsall with his wife, Alice De Doncaster, both of Yorkshire would have their first child christened two shires (about 150 miles) away, when their other seven children were christened in Yorkshire?

Our Henry does report that he was married in St. Stephen Parrish Church in Norwich, Norfolk England April 9, 1610 to Agnes Kempe. Their first child, Judith, is christened there a year later. But, after making a thorough search of the parish records for Christenings we have found no evidence indicating that a Henry Birdsall was born there in 1578. In fact the Birdsall name is very rare in the Norwich area.

According to Founders of Early American Families: Emigrants from Europe 1607-1657, Henry is born in 1582, immigrates in 1632 and settles in Salem by 1636. Their information claims to have been acquired from the Birdsall family members, but gives no hint as to where Henry was born. Unfortunately, the official church christening, marriage and death records in the 1500's are few. The original records are difficult, and in some cases impossible to read, and death records for Norwich are not found in Salt Lake's Family History Library. If our Henry was born in 1578 he would have been 32 years old and Agnes a mere 18 at the time of their marriage. If he was born in 1582, he would have been ten years her senior when they marry, a more likely scenario.

The Ancestral file inaccurately lists him as having been married previously to Margaret Britwin. Yet, we know that Margaret was married to William Kempe the 25th of April 1562, and she is the grandmother of Henry's wife, Agnes. The Kempe family hails from Carleton-Rode, Norfolk, 12.4 miles southwest of the center of Norwich. There is a good marriage index in which we found the marriage records for Agnes' father, Stephen Kempe, to her mother, Agnes Alexandar in the parish church 25 July 1591, and of her grandfather, William Kempe and grandmother, Margaret Britwin, 29 years earlier in the same church.

Upon their marriage Henry and Agnes settle in the center of Norwich. We have a copy of the original christening record in St. Stephen for Judith on 2 June 1611. Anne is born five years later and christened at St. John, Timberhill, Norfolk, on the 24th of May 1616. Nathan is christened four years after Anne at St. Andrew, the 3rd of September 1620. All three parishes are within four or five blocks of each other in the heart of Norwich.

The Birdsall name is only listed five times in Norwich records. Our Henry at the time of his marriage to Agnes, the christening of his three children and there is one more curious entry in the marriage records. " Henry Birshall and Ann Griffin 1 April 1627. It is conceivable that Agnes dies after Nathan's birth leaving Henry with a young family and that he does remarry before coming to New England. As mentioned before our Family History Library in Salt Lake has no death records for that area during that time period. According to the Great Migration, Immigrants to New England 1634-1635, however, Henry arrived in Boston in 1635 with his wife, Agnes Kempe and children, Judith, Anne and Nathan. Another source, Founders of Early American Families, 1607-1657, claims Henry arrived in 1632. Such differences ware common among colonial scholars as ship captains were not required to turn in passenger lists until 1820, and hence the dates are often recorded years later according to the memories of passengers or their descendants.

Salem did not begin keeping death records until 1650, and only a very few deaths are listed in Boston's vital Records between 1630 to 1699. The names of Agnes and Anne are not mentioned in any of these. Judith married at the age of 28 and Nathan at the age of 25. No record exists of a marriage for Anne and so we can logically assume she passed away before she was 30 years old (1646).

What we do know is that: "most emigrants, then whether male or female, married or single, household head or servant -- eventually conformed to the common pattern in settling, New England. They would spend their first year or two moving about the region, and most would finally choose for their permanent home a newly founded community where they might still obtain farms near the town center and enjoy proprietary privileges. There they would stay and improve the family farms that eventually supported their children and even many of their grandchildren.

This pattern of short-run mobility followed by long-run persistence characterized 8 out of 10 household heads."

On December 14, 1637 Henry is allotted 15 acres in Boston. He is referred to as a "freeman," which meant that he had full rights to vote and participate as a citizen. We also know that he had at least some education and could read as "books" are listed in his inventory at the time of his death. By 1638 he had moved to Salem approximately 15 miles away and is admitted into the Salem Church. He was made a freeman in Salem's community May 2, 1638. He serves as a juryman in the Quarter Court January 25th 1639. In 1644 he is hired to sweep the church and keep it clean, proof that he was an affiliated Puritan. That same year his daughter, Judith, is married to Henry Cook. His son, Nathan marries Temperance Baldwin the next year and they settle in Oyster Bay, New York.

There is one more baffling piece of information listed in the book, New England marriages. Prior to 1700, Henry Birdsall is listed as marrying a third time to a "?" who was born in 1623 of Salem. This would make her three years younger than his youngest child. There is no date attached to their marriage, nor name.

In 1649, now 71 years old, Henry buys a house, shop and one acre of land from his father-in-law, Henry Cook for ten dollars. He dies two years later, 17 September 1651. Included in his inventory taken at the time of his death are the following interesting items: 2 swine, a feather bed, an old sword and musket, books and 'tools for his trade' but we are not told the nature of that trade." A complete list of his inventory can be found on page 3 of Pioneers of Massachusetts.
Unfortunately, although he made a will, it has been lost. Perhaps it would have told us if he left a wife, and how old he was when he died.

There is a book published by the Library of Congress which documents our Birdsall line from 1926 back to Henry in Salem. It does not go back into England, however, we were able to go through the descending pedigree, check the names through the IGI, and complete the ordinancy work for 412 individuals.

Henry Birdsall and family
from Roots web

THE BIRDSALL FAMILY AND NAME

Just when Henry Birdsall left England and came to America is not known, but records show that he was admitted to the Church in Salem, Massachusetts, in 1638, and on March 2, 1638, he was made a freeman, and at the Quarter Court, held January 25, 1639, he officiated as a juryman.

The name of Nathan Birdsall, son of Henry, appears on the Long Island records at East Hampton, July 5, 1653. He married about the year 1650 Temperance Baldwin, the daughter of Elizabeth Alsop and Richard Baldwin and he died about 1698, having assigned property to his sons, Stephen and Henry. Nathan Birdsall, also had four other sons, Stephen, Benjamin, William and Nathan Jr.

Benjamin, the oldest son of Nathan, is recorded first in the Oyster Bay records, February 20, 1684-85, showing that he and his brother Stephen were of the Syndicate formed for the purpose of purchasing 100 acres of land from the Indians.

Nathan, son of Benjamin, was born 1705, and married April 12, 1726, Jane Langdon, daughter of John Langdon, both residents of Hempstead, Long Island. Soon after the family removed to Westchester County, New York, but Nathan in 1728 settled in Quaker Hill, Dutchess County, New York, arriving there with one child by way of Purchase, New York, and his name appears on the Quaker records there. Some of the family settled at Chappaqua, New York, and in the near vicinity where many of the descendants still reside.

The name Birdsall is decidedly English, Bel, to Birdsall - in the Doomesday Book - Btiteshala, Brit's or Brid's, meaning "Slope Land." (source: excerpt from : Ada C. Haight, The Richard Washburn Family Genealogy, Ossining, New York. 1937, pages 13-14.
found on ancestry.com

HENRY COOK 1615-1661

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of William Elmer, son of John Elmer, son of Mary Kibbe (Elmer), daughter of Daniel Kibbe, son of James Kibbe, son of Rachel Cook (Kibbe), daughter of Henry Cook.]



Salem Lots Early 1600s

The Salem Lots History of Salem pages 314 and 315 Vol. 1 Establishment of the Town


No record of the first layout of Salem is known to exist. The plan of the layout of that part of Salem known as the "town" has been prepared by tracing the land titles to the earliest date possible. The recording of deeds began too late to give the earliest changes of titles. Most of the earliest lots were two acres each, and soon after (before 1635) they were limited to one acre. Apparently the two-acre lots were on the North River and those of one acre were along the South River and easterly of Central Street. Some of the lots shown on the plan were the aggregate of several original small ones, and in some instances several small ones constituted one original lot. The lot marked B. G. is the original burying ground. The lots are numbered only so that they can be here referred to intelligently. They were not so designated on the records. The following is a list of the names of the various owners of the lots at the dates stated, which is the earliest information that has been obtained. The scale of this map is one inch to eleven hundred and forty feet. Lot #68 belonged to Henry Cook. Lot #97 belonged to John Ingersoll.

Henry Cook and Judith Birdsall

In June of 1639, in the young New England settlement of Salem, Massachusetts, Henry Cook and Judith Birdsall married. She was twenty-eight years old, and Henry was likely a little older. Henry was a butcher, the intricacies of which trade he had probably learned in England, before he sailed the ocean.

March 30, 1640, Edward Ingram and Henry were appointed to keep the local swine for six shillings for each animal. Each morning these two men walked through town on their way to the pasture, blowing their horn. The owners of swine brought them out to the drove, thus constantly increas­ing the numbers. The keepers returned the animals at sunset. The men were responsible for any swine that became lost. However, they were excused from the loss of any killed by wild beasts if they brought home a part of the flesh as evidence.

Between 1640 and 1658 ten children were born into the Cook family. These consisted of four sons and six daughters. Only one of them, a daugh­ter, died as an infant or child.

In October 1649 Henry needed funds, and, to get them, mortgaged to his father-in-law, Henry Birdsall, Ahis howse, a shop and one acre of ground thereto adjoyning in Salem.@

Toward the end of the family increasings, even though their house was full, Henry and Judith agreed to care for a town charge by the name of John Talbey. Their stipulated term of service, beginning January 29, 1655/6, was for a year. The town would supply his shirts, cloth to make a coat, cov­ering for a bed, and some things to make a bed. The Cooks would be given eight bushels of Indian corn to help with other needs. John Talbey appar­ently remained less than seven months of his year. August 4, 1656, the selectmen Ordered that John Talbey being commonly noted for a person spending his time idly and unprofitably: we think it meet that he should be sent to the next magistrate to be employed accordingly (provided for such persons).@ The next year the vote was to put him in the house of correction at Ipswich.

Henry passed away on Christmas day in 1661. This left Judith a widow with nine children, the oldest twenty-one and the youngest three. Henry had been granted land over the years, and had undoubtedly farmed it, with help from sons. Probably the farming continued, and needs were met. The children married as the years passed, and by the time Judith died in 1689 she had many grandchildren.

Historical information is from S. Perley, History of Salem 2:50-51, 61, 99, 158, 203, 221,

Henry Cook
Biography

There are four generations in our family where our direct ancestor had the same name. Our first American forefather was Henry Senior who was at Salem Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1638, it is believed that he came from England shortly before that date since there is no record of him prior to that time. It has been recorded that Henry was born in County Kent in England, but this is not definitely known. The name of Henry's father has not been established it is known that there were several distinct branches of the family Cook or Cooke in England in the 1600's all of whom could trace the family lineage to the earliest ancestor, Gilbert Cocus or Cook or Cooke who lived during the time of William the Conqueror in the eleventh century The name Sir Henry and Sir George Cooke of Yorkshire appear in the seventeenth century, they were sons of Bryan Cooke of that county, and is the first appearance of the given name Henry. It is not definitely known from which of the many illustrious lines of the family in England the first immigrants of the name to come to America were descended, but all of the families bearing the name are said to have been of common origin and of ancient ancestry. It has also been stated that Henry was a descendant of the Cooks of Hertfordshire.

Our Henry was a Puritan in his religious beliefs, this probably being the reason for his early immigration to New England, since there was a great deal of discrimination practiced in England at the time against those of the faith. He was obviously a successful farmer and active in the political atmosphere of the colony. His name is mentioned on several occasions in the records of the proceedings of the Common Council and the Salem Town Records. In these records the following reference is made; "Henry Cook and Samuel Ebourne appointed to be surveyors for the north neck and all fields about the Glass House, and for about Though. Goidwaight field and VP to Michele Slaffin." at a town meeting of the Selectmen 14 January 1659/60. And secondly, "At a General Town meeting held 3 March 1661; Granted that the lands lying along the highway against Though. Goidwaites andgiven to Hugh James and by him sold to William Robinson and the Widow Cooke (Judith) from the way to the brook as it was divided by Mayor Hathorne and William Bartholmew, shall all belong to the widow Cooke and William Robinson" Although the family of Frederick Cooke, of the Mayflower had resided at Salem none bore the given name Judith, this can only refer to our family. Judith was the daughter of Henry Burdsall or Birdsall who arrived in America in 1632 from Yorkshire County England. Henry Birdsall was a member of the First Church at Salem in 1636 and was registered a freeman May 2, 1638. Henry was a widower and he came to Salem with Judith age 13 and a son, Nathan age 21. Judith of course being the wife of our Henry Cook. Both Henry and Judith remained at Salem where they died, sons Henry Jr. and Samuel removed to Wallingford, Connecticut at an early date the other children all remained in Massachusetts.

On Christmas day, 1638, the quarterly Court in Salem granted Henry six acres. He was a butcher and lived on Washington Street, on the southeasterly corner of the site of the Masonic Temple. He bought the house and land from Edmond Thompson on January 17, 1645, and his widow conveyed the property to Walter Price on January 13, 1663. The house was taken down in 1764. Henry was appointed to keep the swine for six shillings for each animal. As he walked through the town on his way to the pasture in the morning, he blew his horn, and the owners of the swine brought them out to the drove, which was thus constantly increased in numbers. They returned at sunset. He was responsible for those lost, except if he could prove they were killed by wild animals.


Henry also surveyed fences in 1645/6, and in 1649 he was granted 40 acres "beyond the river on this side of Henerie Batholmew". On November 27, 1658, the town ordered that the forty acres granted to Henry was to be labeled as Lot 68.


On March 14, 1659/60, Salem voted that he and Samuel Ebourne should survey the fences for North Neck and about the glasshouse and Thomas Gouldthwaight's field and up to Michael Safflin's. On December 24, 1655, the town was to put John Talbey out as a servant, at the town's expense, to whomever would take him. On January 29, 1656 , Henry agreed to take him for a year in exchange for eight bushels of Indian corn. The town was to furnish Talbey with shirts, a coat, and bedding. Henry had to appear in court for beating and kicking two sons of Mr. Abourn on Christmas day, but he was discharged.

Henry Cook, Salem, Massachusetts

The surname Cook is one of the oldest English surnames, derived from the occupation of some progenitor of the eleventh or twelfth century, and the family is found scattered throughout the United Kingdom. More than a dozen of this surname settled in Massachusetts Bay and Plymouth colonies before 1650, and one of them, Francis Cook, was prominent among the Pilgrims who came in the "Mayflower."


Henry was the first Cook in America. He was at Salem, Massachusetts in 1638 and most likely arrived in US a short time before that. He is believed to be a descendant of the Cooks of Kent or Hertsfordshire who migrated from Normandy in the 11th century. He came to New England as a Puritan. Sons, Samuel and Henry Jr. emigrated to Connecticut while the rest remained in Massachusetts. The family also lived at Plymouth Connecticut. for a time.


The farm was passed to the widow after he died and it is unknown where it passed from there. Henry was a Butcher.


Resources : Families of Ancient New Haven p27.

Ancestor Likely Arrival in Salem
Henry COOK (COOKE) 1638

Henry Cook, immigrant ancestor, was born in England, and settled in Salem, Massachusetts, where he was a proprietor as early as 1638. He was a butcher by trade. He married, June, 1639, Judith Birdsale. Some authorities locate him at Plymouth. He died at Salem, January 14, 1661. His estate was administered June 26, 1662. His widow Judith died in 1689.


Children:
1. Isaac, born April 3, 1640.
2. Samuel, September 30, 1641; mentioned below.
3. Judith, September 15, 1643.
4. Rachel, September 25, 1645.
5. John, September 6, 1647.
6. Martha, September 14, 1650 (twin).
7. Mary, twin of Martha.
8. Henry, December 30, 1652.
9. Eliza, born and died in 1654.
10. Hannah, September 1658.


Henry Cook lived in Salem on Washington Street.

1692 Salem, Massachusetts was the sight of the worst case of mass hysteria in American history! It started with the ravings of 4 young girls and ended with the imprisonment of hundreds and the deaths of 24 men and women all accused of the sin of witchcraft! When the infamous Salem Witch Trials were over, 19 men and women were hanged to death on Gallows Hill, 4 died in prison, and one defiant man, Giles Corey, was pressed to death beneath a board and stones in a torturous attempt to obtain a confession. 300 years later, many of the historic sights in Salem, Massachusetts are still preserved for generations to come. The Salem cemetery, (the 2nd oldest cemetery in the country), still holds the final resting places for many of the 'Witch Trial' participants and, though the tombstones are worn from time they are still legible. The gallows tree still stands, and the original homes of accused witch, Rebecca Nurse, and trial Judge Jonathan Corwin still stand as a reminder that "those who forget the past are doomed to repeat it."

More Henry Cooke (Cook)

Henry was the first Cook in America. He was at Salem, Massachusetts. in 1638 and most likely
arrived in US a short time before that. He is believed to be a descendant of the Cooks
of Kent or Hertsfordshire who migrated from Normandy in the 11th century. He came
to New England as a Puritan. Sons, Samuel and Henry Jr. emigrated to Connecticut
while the rest remained in Massachusetts. The family also lived at Plymouth Connecticut for a time.


The farm was passed to the widow after he died and it is unknown where it passed from there. Henry was a Butcher .

Resources : Families of Ancient New Haven p27.

RICHARD INGERSOLL 1587-1644

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of William Elmer, son of John Elmer, son of Mary Kibbe (Elmer), daughter of Daniel Kibbe, son of Hannah Kelsey (Kibbe), daughter of Hannah Ingersol (Kelsey), daughter of John Ingersoll, son of Richard Ingersoll.]

Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-33
The Great Migration Begins
Sketches

RICHARD INGERSOLL
ORIGIN: Sutton, Bedfordshire, England
MIGRATION: 1629
FIRST RESIDENCE: Salem

OCCUPATION: Ferryman. ("Ric[har]d Inkersoll" was allowed one penny for every person he ferried over the north river, 16 January 1636/7 [STR 1:31].)

EDUCATION: Signed his will with a mark. The will also has the annotation, made by John Endicott, that "I read this will to Richard Ingersoll and he acknowledged it to be his will."

OFFICES: On 7 July 1644, ordered to "walk forth in the time of God's worship, to take notice of such as either lie about the meeting house without attending to the word or ordinances, or that lie at home or in the fields..." (apparently on the sixth Sunday following, paired with Robert Moulton, Jr.) [STR 1:131].

ESTATE: In 1636 received eighty acres in Salem, but not in the freeman's land [STR 1:20]. Granted one acre of marsh in Salem on 25 December 1637, with a household of nine [STR 1:103].

He received two acres for a houselot 6 April 1635 and was reminded to allow room for a highway on his land [STR 1:9]. With Edward Giles and Pasco Foot, Ingersoll was considered for land by the "frost fish brook" next to Goodman Barney, 10 April 1637 [STR 1:44]. On 20 November 1639 Richard Ingersoll received ten acres of meadow in the great meadow at Salem, having already received twenty acres on 23 December 1638 [STR 1:92, 94].

In his will, dated 21 July 1644 and proved 2 January 1644/5, Richard Ingersoll of Salem gave all to "Ann my wife," except to "George Ingersoll my son six acres lying in the great meadow," to "Nathaniel Ingersoll my youngest son a parcel of ground with a little frame thereon" (unless Nathaniel dies without issue, in which case the land should be divided equally among "John Ingersoll my son and Richard Pettingell and William Haines my sons-in-law"), to "Bathsheba my youngest daughter two cows", and to "my daughter Alice Walcott my house at town with 10 acres of upland and meadow after my wife's decease"; witnessed by Townsend Bishop [NEHGR 9:157] (What appears to be a different version of this will refers to both Bathsheba and Alice as youngest daughter, which is clearly impossible [EPR 1:43; EQC 1:76]. Without examining the originals of these documents we cannot tell whether the error was made by the seventeenth-century or the nineteenth-century copyist.)

The inventory, taken 4 October 1644 by Townsend Bishop and Jeffrey Massey, totalled £213 19s., of which £47 10s. 10d. was real estate: a farm, 80 acres, meadow, 20 acres, £14 3s. 4d.; another farm, 75 acres, £7; and 26 acres, 2 houses, 2 acres [and] a quarter of salt marsh, £26 7s. 6d. [EPR 1:458; EQC 1:76].

On 10 April 1668 Anne Knight deeded eighty acres at Royalside, bequeathed to her by her late husband "Richard Ingerson," to their sons "John and Nathaniel Ingerson" with the consent of her now husband John Knight Sr. of Newbury [EQC 4:109].

BIRTH: Baptized 10 March 1587 at Sandy, Bedfordshire, son of George "Inkerstall" [Abel Lunt Anc 63].

DEATH: Salem between 24 July 1644 (date of will) and 4 October 1644 (date of inventory).

MARRIAGE: Sandy, Bedfordshire, 10 October 1611 Agnes Langlye [Abel Lunt Anc 63]. Anne Ingersoll is included in the list of those admitted to Salem church before the end of 1636, with the annotation "removed" [SChR 6]. She married (2) by 1652 John Knight of Newbury and was living at the time he made his will, 5 May 1670, in which he bequeathed to "my wife's grandchild Thomas Hains, £10 to be paid after his time is out" [EPR 2:191].

CHILDREN (baptisms for i-vi from Abel Lunt Anc 65-67):

i ALICE, baptized Sandy, Bedfordshire, 21 December 1612; married by about 1634 William Walcott (in the Salem land grant of 25 December 1637 "Will[iam] Walcot" was credited with a household of four, which indicates a wife and perhaps two children by that date [STR 1:103]), who seems to have become incompetent within a decade. (In December 1643 "Willia[m] Walcott's wife, children and estate" were entrusted to "Richard Inkersell, his father-in-law, to be disposed of `according to God; and the said William Wolcott to be and remain as his servant'" [EQC 1:57]. This arrangement lasted less than a year, terminated at the death of Richard Ingersoll.)

ii JOHN, baptized Edworth, Bedfordshire, 1 October 1615 and buried there 17 November 1615.

iii GEORGE, baptized Sutton, Bedfordshire, 2 July 1618; married by 1646 Elizabeth _____ (eldest child born Gloucester 16 October 1646).

iv JOHN, baptized Sutton, 11 March 1620[/1?]; married by 1644 Judith Felton (eldest child born Salem 12 September 1644; in his will of 20 November 1683 John Ingersoll names as an overseer "brother-in-law Nathaniel Felton" [Abel Lunt Anc 67, citing EPR 302:57]).

v JOAN, baptized Sutton 3 March 1624[/5?]; married by 1644 Richard Pettingill.

vi SARAH, baptized Sutton 1 July 1627; married (1) by 1644 William Haynes; married (2) Newbury 13 November 1651 Joseph Holton.

vii BATHSHEBA, born Salem say 1629; married Newbury [--] 16[--] John Knight (apparently by 1648, as eldest known child, son John, was born Newbury 16 August 1648).

viii NATHANIEL, born Salem about 1633 (deposed aged 40 years 30 June 1674 [SJC #1503], deposed aged "45 years or thereabouts" 25 June 1678 [EQC 49:15], deposed aged 60 years 25 December 1694 [SJC #3212]); married Salem 25 March 16__ (which must be 1669 or earlier [TAG 27:130, citing ELR 7:57]) Hannah Collins.

COMMENTS: 28 May 1629 letter of instruction from Massachusetts Bay Company to John Endicott: "There is also one Richard Haward and Richard Inkersall, both Bedfordshire men, hired for the Company with their families, who we pray you may be well accommodated, not doubting but they will well and orderly demean themselves" [MBCR 1:401; SLR 1:xvi].

In the 1636 Salem land grant, Richard Ingersoll appears in that portion of the list which included "non-freemen," which in Salem tells us clearly that he was not a member of the church. In the 1637 Salem land grant, Richard Ingersoll is shown with a family of nine. Seven of his children were living at that date, but his eldest daughter Alice was already married to William Walcott and would have been included in her husband's household. Thus, there may have been an additional child otherwise unrecorded, but this child in turn must have died before 1644; alternatively there may have been a more distant relative or a servant living with the Ingersolls that year.

Ingersoll had the usual problems with fences and encroachment on land, but the land grant next to Jacob Barney was a problem. Ingersoll sued Jacob Barney at the September Term, 1639, probably regarding land [EQC 1:13]. Barney sued him back over feeding cattle in his marsh, September Term, 1640, and won a verdict of "[t]wo loads of hay at water side as convenient as his own was" [EQC 1:21]. Joshua Verrin sued Ingersoll at the same term over maintenance of a fence and was countersued immediately [EQC 1:22, 29].

For some of the larger and more expensive farm implements noted in Ingersoll's inventory, it is stated that he owned one third of each item. This would indicate that he shared ownership with one or two other husbandmen in the neighborhood, or, as seems more likely, with two of his sons. In depositions at the June 1678 Essex Quarterly Court, the brothers George, John and Nathaniel "Ingerson" gave evidence regarding events in the 1640s. George deposed that "living a partner with his father Richard Ingerson upon the farm that the said Rich[ar]d Ingerson hired of Mr. Chickering which the said Chickering had bought of Mr. Townsend Bishop," demonstrating that the Ingersolls were in a cooperative family enterprise and placing them on Mr. Chickering's farm.

Richard Ingersoll found the Salem miller lacking and in September 1640 took grandjuryman Lawrence Leech with him to the mill to prove that the grists were "much short of weight" [EQC 1:20]. His neighbors found his cattle and the cattle of a dozen other men offensive in the common cornfields and Ingersoll paid the court's fine [EQC 1:49, 56].

BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE:
There is an excellent treatment of Richard Ingersoll in "The Ancestry of Abel Lunt" ... by Walter Goodwin Davis (pp. 63-68), and details may be found there of the marriages and later lives of Richard's children.

Mrs. William C. Clark, "The Parents of Jonathan Haynes of Newbury and Haverhill, Massachusetts, and Some of Their Descendants" [TAG 27:129-34], provides extensive documentation on the fate of some of Richard Ingersoll's children and property.
John B. Threlfall also published an account of this family in 1993 [GMC26 141-48].


Immigration of Richard Ingersoll
1629 RICHARD INGERSOLL - from England on the Mayflower - 11th generation (S1110)

RICHARD INGERSOLL was born March 10, 1587 in Edworth, Bedfordshire, England, the son of George Ingersoll.

Richard married Ann Langley October 10, 1611 at Sandy, County of Bedford, England. Ann was born about 1576, the daughter of Thomas and Ann Langley.

Richard and Ann were the parents of eight children, three sons and five daughters. Probably all but one was born in England. Nathaniel was born in America but Bathsheba was born in 1629, the year they arrived in America.

The family came to America arriving at Plymouth, Massachusetts on May 15, 1629 on the ship "Mayflower". They brought with them letters of recommendation from William Craddock which were given to Governor Endicott. Subsequently, Richard was granted 80 acres of land on the east side of Wooleston River and a two-acre Salem Town lot. At the time Richard was 42 years old.

Richard died July 21, 1644 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts at the age of 57. His wife, Ann, then married John Knight, a merchant sailor of Newbury, Massachusetts. John died in 1670; Ann died at Salem July 30, 1677 about 101 years old.


Mayflower!
Richard INGERSOLLHUSBAND:
[F14978]. Richard INGERSOLL. (INKERSALL).

Born on 10 March 1587 at Edworth, Bedfordshire, England; son of George INKERSALL [F29956] and Alice HANKIN [F29957]. He was christened on 16 March 1587 at Edworth. He married (1) Ann LANGLEY [F14979] on 10 (20-s?) October 1611 at St. Swithin's Church, Sandy, Bedfordshire, England.

Robert, his wife Ann, and five children (including 1-year-old daughter Sarah) arrived at Plymouth, Massachusetts on 15 May 1629 on board the ship Mayflower II. Two more children were born after their arrival in America. {S1}.

A letter of instruction from the Massachusetts Bay Company written to John Endicott in Salem on May 28, 1629 stated "There is also one Richard Haward and Richard Inkersall, both Bedfordshire men, hired for the Company with their families, who we pray you may be well accommodated, not doubting but they will well and orderly demean themselves." {S3}.

Richard Ingersoll brought letters of recommendation from William Craddock which were handed over to the Massachusetts Governor Endicott. Subsequently, Richard Ingersoll was granted 80 acres of land on the east side of the Wooleston River and a two acre Salem Town lot. At this town lot site he operated a ferry across the North River. He also leased the Townsend Bishop farm for a number of years and shortly before he died purchased jointly with his son-in-law, William Haynes, the Weston Grant in Salem Village. {S1}.

Various land grants to Richard are of non-freeman portions, so he was not a member of the church. He was the ferryman, and he and his sons cooperatively farmed. Various legal documents show they shared ownership of large equipment and rented land together. {S3}.

His will was written on 21 July 1644 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts. In his will, William Haynes was designated as a son-in-law and bequeathed a portion of property to be divided equally among a son (John Ingersoll) and another son-in-law (Richard Pettingall) on the condition if Richard Ingersoll's youngest son (Nathaniel Ingersoll) should die without issue. This condition became important later, when in fact, Nathaniel Ingersoll, the youngest son died without natural heirs in 1719. {S1}.

The will, in part, included the words:
Item- I give to Nathaniel Ingersoll my youngest son a parcell of ground, which I bought of John P-, but if the said Nathaniel dy without issue of his body lawfully begotten, then the land aforesaid to be equally shared between John Ingersoll, my son, and Richard Pettingill and William Haines my sons in law. (Richard Ingersoll Will, Salem, Essex Co. New England, 21 Jul 1644) {S1}.
He died before January 1645, probably not long after the writing of his will. {S1}.

WIFE:
[F14979]. Ann LANGLEY. (Agnes).
Born about 1590 at Sandy, Bedfordshire, England; daughter of Thomas LANGLEY [F29958] and Ann [F29959]. She married (1) Richard INGERSOLL [F14978] on 10 October 1611 at St. Swithin's Church, Sandy, Bedfordshire, England. She married (2) John KNIGHT Sr., a merchant sailor of Newbury, after 1645 at Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. They are seen in records as living in Newbury. John Knight died in newbury in 1670. Ann died on 30 Jul 1677 at (Salem-S2)(Newbury-S1), Essex County, Massachusetts.

CHILDREN of Richard INGERSOLL [F14978] and Ann LANGLEY [F14979]

Alice INGERSOLL. Christened on 21 December 1612 at St. Swithin's Church, Sandy, Bedfordshire, England. She married William WALCOTT about 1630 in Salem, Essex County. Massachusetts. She died after 1644 in Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts.

John INGERSOLL. Born (or christened) on 1 October 1615 at Edworth, Bedfordshire, England. He died on 17 November 1615 in Edworth, Bedfordshire, England.

(Lt) George INGERSOLL Sr. Christened on 2 July 1618 at Sutton, Bedfordshire, England. He married Elizabeth LUNT about 1642 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts. He died after 22 June 1694 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts; and was buried in Salem.

John INGERSOLL. Christened on 11 March 1620 at Sutton, Bedfordshire, England. He married Judith FELTON about 1643 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts. He died after 20 November 1683 in Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts; and was buried before 27 December 1683 in Salem.

Joanna INGERSOLL. Christened on 3 March 1624 at Sutton, Bedfordshire, England. She married Richard PETTINGELL in 1643 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts. She died in 1693 at Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. [F7489].

Sarah INGERSOLL. Born about 1627 in Bedfordshire, England. She was christened on 1 July 1627 at Sutton, Bedfordshire, England. She married (1) WILLIAM HAYES [F7488]. She married (2) Joseph HOULTON on 13 November 1651 at Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. They resided in Newbury. She died in 1719 in Houlton, Massachusetts.

Bathsheba INGERSOLL. Christened on 1 July 1629 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts. She married John KNIGHT Jr. in 1647 at Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. She died on 25 October 1705 at Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts.

Nathaniel INGERSOLL. Born about 1632 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts. He married Hannah COLLINS on 25 March 1657 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts. He died on 27 Jan 1719 at Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts.

SOURCES:
[S1]. JONATHAN HAYNES of Newbury and Haverhill, Massachusetts. Haynes Family Genealogy. compiled and written by Paulette Haynes. 1984 and revised 2002. http://members.aol.com/chrishayne/jonathan.htm. and http://members.aol.com/CHRISHAYNE/salem.htm.
[S2]. Bill Wescott research. http://homepage.mac.com/billwesco/WC14/WC14_082.HTML
[S3]. The Earliest Haynes in North America. http://home.fuse.net/flund/firstsettlersL.htm


Biography Of Richard Ingersoll/Inkersoll
about 1630, Salem, Massachusetts
RICHARD INGERSOLL
ORIGIN: Sutton, Bedfordshire
MIGRATION: 1629
FIRST RESIDENCE: Salem
OCCUPATION: Ferryman. ("Ric[har]d Inkersoll" was allowed one penny for every person he ferried over the north river, 16 January 1636/7 [ STR 1:31].)
EDUCATION: Signed his will with a mark. The will also has the annotation, made by John Endicott, that "I read this will to Richard Ingersoll and he acknowledged it to be his will."
OFFICES: On 7 July 1644, ordered to "walk forth in the time of God's worship, to take notice of such as either lie about the meeting house without attending to the word or ordinances, or that lie at home or in the fields..." (apparently on the sixth Sunday following, paired with Robert Moulton, Jr.) [STR 1:131].
ESTATE: In 1636 received eighty acres in Salem, but not in the freeman's land [STR 1:20]. Granted one acre of marsh in Salem on 25 December 1637, with a household of nine [STR 1:103].

He received two acres for a houselot 6 April 1635 and was reminded to allow room for a highway on his land [STR 1:9]. With Edward Giles and Pasco Foot, Ingersoll was considered for land by the "frost fish brook" next to Goodman Barney, 10 April 1637 [STR 1:44]. On 20 November 1639 Richard Ingersoll received ten acres of meadow in the great meadow at Salem, having already received twenty acres on 23 December 1638 [STR 1:92, 94].

In his will, dated 21 July 1644 and proved 2 January 1644/5, Richard Ingersoll of Salem gave all to "Ann my wife," except to "George Ingersoll my son six acres lying in the great meadow," to "Nathaniel Ingersoll my youngest son a parcel of ground with a little frame thereon" (unless Nathaniel dies without issue, in which case the land should be divided equally among "John Ingersoll my son and Richard Pettingell and William Haines my sons-in-law"), to "Bathsheba my youngest daughter two cows", and to "my daughter Alice Walcott my house at town with 10 acres of upland and meadow after my wife's decease"; witnessed by Townsend Bishop [ NEHGR 9:157] (What appears to be a different version of this will refers to both Bathsheba and Alice as youngest daughter, which is clearly impossible [ EPR 1:43; EQC 1:76]. Without examining the originals of these documents we cannot tell whether the error was made by the seventeenth-century or the nineteenth-century copyist.)

The inventory, taken 4 October 1644 by Townsend Bishop and Jeffrey Massey, totalled £213 19s., of which £47 10s. 10d. was real estate: a farm, 80 acres, meadow, 20 acres, £14 3s. 4d.; another farm, 75 acres, £7; and 26 acres, 2 houses, 2 acres [and] a quarter of salt marsh, £26 7s. 6d. [EPR 1:458; EQC 1:76].

On 10 April 1668 Anne Knight deeded eighty acres at Royalside, bequeathed to her by her late husband "Richard Ingerson," to their sons "John and Nathaniel Ingerson" with the consent of her now husband John Knight Sr. of Newbury [EQC 4:109].

BIRTH: Baptized 10 March 1587 at Sandy, Bedfordshire, son of George "Inkerstall" [ Abel Lunt Anc 63].

DEATH: Salem between 24 July 1644 (date of will) and 4 October 1644 (date of inventory).

MARRIAGE: Sandy, Bedfordshire, 10 October 1611 Agnes Langlye [Abel Lunt Anc 63]. Anne Ingersoll is included in the list of those admitted to Salem church before the end of 1636, with the annotation "removed" [ SChR 6]. She married (2) by 1652 John Knight of Newbury and was living at the time he made his will, 5 May 1670, in which he bequeathed to "my wife's grandchild Thomas Hains, £10 to be paid after his time is out" [EPR 2:191].

CHILDREN (baptisms for i-vi from Abel Lunt Anc 65-67):
i ALICE, baptized Sandy, Bedfordshire, 21 December 1612; married by about 1634 William Walcott (in the Salem land grant of 25 December 1637 "Will[iam] Walcot" was credited with a household of four, which indicates a wife and perhaps two children by that date [STR 1:103]), who seems to have become incompetent within a decade. (In December 1643 "Willia[m] Walcott's wife, children and estate" were entrusted to "Richard Inkersell, his father-in-law, to be disposed of `according to God; and the said William Wolcott to be and remain as his servant'" [EQC 1:57]. This arrangement lasted less than a year, terminated at the death of Richard Ingersoll.)

ii JOHN, baptized Edworth, Bedfordshire, 1 October 1615 and buried there 17 November 1615.

iii GEORGE, baptized Sutton, Bedfordshire, 2 July 1618; married by 1646 Elizabeth _____ (eldest child born Gloucester 16 October 1646).

iv JOHN, baptized Sutton, 11 March 1620[/1?]; married by 1644 Judith Felton (eldest child born Salem 12 September 1644; in his will of 20 November 1683 John Ingersoll names as an overseer "brother-in-law Nathaniel Felton" [Abel Lunt Anc 67, citing EPR 302:57]).

v JOAN, baptized Sutton 3 March 1624[/5?]; married by 1644 Richard Pettingill.

vi SARAH, baptized Sutton 1 July 1627; married (1) by 1644 William Haynes; married (2) Newbury 13 November 1651 Joseph Holton.

vii BATHSHEBA, born Salem say 1629; married Newbury [--] 16[--] John Knight (apparently by 1648, as eldest known child, son John, was born Newbury 16 August 1648).

viii NATHANIEL, born Salem about 1633 (deposed aged 40 years 30 June 1674 [ SJC #1503], deposed aged "45 years or thereabouts" 25 June 1678 [EQC 49:15], deposed aged 60 years 25 December 1694 [SJC #3212]); married Salem 25 March 16__ (which must be 1669 or earlier [ TAG 27:130, citing ELR 7:57]) Hannah Collins.

COMMENTS: 28 May 1629 letter of instruction from Massachusetts Bay Company to John Endicott: "There is also one Richard Haward and Richard Inkersall, both Bedfordshire men, hired for the Company with their families, who we pray you may be well accommodated, not doubting but they will well and orderly demean themselves" [ MBCR 1:401; SLR 1:xvi].
In the 1636 Salem land grant, Richard Ingersoll appears in that portion of the list which included "non-freemen," which in Salem tells us clearly that he was not a member of the church. In the 1637 Salem land grant, Richard Ingersoll is shown with a family of nine. Seven of his children were living at that date, but his eldest daughter Alice was already married to William Walcott and would have been included in her husband's household. Thus, there may have been an additional child otherwise unrecorded, but this child in turn must have died before 1644; alternatively there may have been a more distant relative or a servant living with the Ingersolls that year.

Ingersoll had the usual problems with fences and encroachment on land, but the land grant next to Jacob Barney was a problem. Ingersoll sued Jacob Barney at the September Term, 1639, probably regarding land [EQC 1:13]. Barney sued him back over feeding cattle in his marsh, September Term, 1640, and won a verdict of "[t]wo loads of hay at water side as convenient as his own was" [EQC 1:21]. Joshua Verrin sued Ingersoll at the same term over maintenance of a fence and was countersued immediately [EQC 1:22, 29].

For some of the larger and more expensive farm implements noted in Ingersoll's inventory, it is stated that he owned one third of each item. This would indicate that he shared ownership with one or two other husbandmen in the neighborhood, or, as seems more likely, with two of his sons. In depositions at the June 1678 Essex Quarterly Court, the brothers George, John and Nathaniel "Ingerson" gave evidence regarding events in the 1640s. George deposed that "living apartner with his father Richard Ingerson upon the farm that the said Rich[ar]d Ingerson hired of Mr. Chickering which the said Chickering had bought of Mr. Townsend Bishop," demonstrating that the Ingersolls were in a cooperative family enterprise and placing them on Mr. Chickering's farm.

Richard Ingersoll found the Salem miller lacking and in September 1640 took grandjuryman Lawrence Leech with him to the mill to prove that the grists were "much short of weight" [EQC 1:20]. His neighbors found his cattle and the cattle of a dozen other men offensive in the common cornfields and Ingersoll paid the court's fine [EQC 1:49, 56].

BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE:

There is an excellent treatment of Richard Ingersoll in The Ancestry of Abel Lunt ... by Walter Goodwin Davis (pp. 63-68), and details may be found there of the marriages and later lives of Richard's children. Mrs. William C. Clark, "The Parents of Jonathan Haynes of Newbury and Haverhill, Massachusetts, and Some of Their Descendants" [TAG 27:129-34], provides extensive documentation on the fate of some of Richard Ingersoll's children and property. John B. Threlfall also published an account of this family in 1993 [ GMC26 141-48].

Notes on Richard Ingersoll (1587-1644)
1600s, Salem

Richard Ingersoll: In his will of 21 July 1644, proved 2 January 1645, he mentions: wife Anne (Langely); sons George, John, and Nathaniel, the youngest; son-in-law Richard Pettingell, who married his daughter Joanna, and William Haines, who married his daughter Sarah, (she had 2nd husband Joseph Houlton); daughters Alice (wife of Josiah Walcot), and Bathsheba, the youngest, (who later married John Knight, Jr., and before 1652, his father John Knight, Sr. married her mother Anne, wh. died 1677.) In his inv. a pair of oxen is set down as of the value of £14, and his farm of fifty acres £7.

The following abstract is taken verbatim fr a copy made by Joshua Coffin when researching the Salem Quarterly Court Records: "I give to Ann my wife all my estate of land, goods and chattels whatsoever except as followeth, viz. I give to George Ingersoll my son six acres of meadow lying in the great meadow. Item I give to nathaniel Ingersoll, my youngest son a parcell of ground with a little frame thereon, which I bought of John P[ease?] but if the said Nathaniel dy without issue of his body lawfully begotten then the land aforesaid to be equally shared between John Ingersoll my son, and Richard Pettingel and William Haines my sons in law. I give to Bathsheba my youngest daughter two cowes. I give to my youngest daughter Alice Walcott my house at town with 10 acres of upland and meadow after my wife's decease. R (his mark) I." I read this will to Richard Ingersoll and he acknowledged it to be his wll. Jo. Endecott." Wit: Townsend Bishop.

Inventory taken 4 October 1644. As illustrating the relative value of land and stock, I give some items of the appraisement of the estate. 7 cows œ34, 2 young steers œ4, bull œ7, pair of oxen œ14, 2 horses and mare and a young colt œ25, a farm of 80 acres œ7. Among other items was a moose Skin Suit. (E. I. Hist. Coll. 1:12.)

He was a Ferryman.7681 He was also known as Richard Inkersall.9766 He came to New England with his family on the 2nd Mayflower in 1629. The Master of this Mayflower was the famous Capt William Pierce. The ship left Gravesend, London, England March 1629 and arrived at Plymouth, May 15, 1629. There were approximately 35 passengers including Richard Ingersall, his wife Anne and their children: George, Joanna, John, Sarah and Alice. He kept the ferry at North River.

(REF: Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-33, Comments on Richard Ingersoll) In the 1636 Salem land grant, Richard Ingersoll appears in that portion of the list which included "non-freemen," which in Salem tells us clearly that he was not a member of the church. In the 1637 Salem land grant, Richard Ingersoll is shown with a family of nine. Seven of his children living at that date, but his eldest daughter Alice was already married to William Walcott and would have been included in her husband's household. Thus, there may have been an additional child otherwise unrecorded, but this child in turn must have died before 1644; alternatively there may have been a more distant relative or a servant living with the Ingersolls that year.

An inventory of the property taken on October 4, 1644. Some of the items listed were as follows: 7 cows, 34 lbs; two young steers, 4 lbs.; bull, 7 lbs.; pair of oxen, 14 lbs.; two horses and mare and young colt, 25 lbs.; a farm of 80 acres, 7 lbs. A moose skin suit was another item.

Among Richard Ingersoll's papers was found this recipe: "A metson to make a man's hear groe when he is bald: Take some fier flies and some Redd worms and sum black snayles and sum hune bees and drie them and pound them to powder and mixt them in milk or water."

It is claimed that a certain house in Salem was built by Richard Ingersoll and was the original house of the romance novel by Nathanial Hawthorne-House of the Seven Gables.

Several years after, the widow, Anne, married John Knight, Sr. of Newbury and litigation arose over the farm her husband had willed her. In the trial, her son-in-law gave the following testimony: "I Richard Pettingell, aged about 45 years doe testify that this farm of land that is now in contriversy was reserved by the widow Inkersoll to herself before her marriage to John Knight, Sr. and she verbally gave this land to John Inkersoll, her son. I, Richard Pettingell doe farder testify that about the year 52 the said John Knight came home to Newbury and tould his wife that hee had promised Mr. Pain sum timber at frost fish river; she was then troubled at it and said what have you to doe to sell my timber wher upon the said John Knight promised her twenty shillings, and the said John Knight, Sr. did then own that he had no right in that land". (Essex Court Files XIV 28-32) John Knight then joined with his wife in conveying the farm to her sons John and Nathaniel "Ingerson".

Allowed one penny per person

OCCUPATION: Ferryman. ("Ric[har]d Inkersoll" was allowed one penny for every person he ferried over the north river, 16 January 1636/7 [STR 1:31].)

He received two acres for a houselot 6 April 1635 and was reminded to allow room for a highway on his land [STR 1:9]. With Edward Giles and Pasco Foot, Ingersoll was considered for land by the "frost fish brook" next to Goodman Barney, 10 April 1637 [STR 1:44]. On 20 November 1639 Richard Ingersoll received ten acres of meadow in the great meadow at Salem, having already received twenty acres on 23 December 1638 [STR 1:92, 94].

In his will, dated 21 July 1644 and proved 2 January 1644/5, Richard Ingersoll of Salem gave all to "Ann my wife," except to "George Ingersoll my son six acres lying in the great meadow," to "Nathaniel Ingersoll my youngest son a parcel of ground with a little frame thereon" (unless Nathaniel dies without issue, in which case the land should be divided equally among "John Ingersoll my son and Richard Pettingell and William Haines my sons-in-law"), to "Bathsheba my youngest daughter two cows", and to "my daughter Alice Walcott my house at town with 10 acres of upland and meadow after my wife's decease"; witnessed by Townsend Bishop [NEHGR 9:157] (What appears to be a different version of this will refers to both Bathsheba and Alice as youngest daughter, which is clearly impossible [EPR 1:43; EQC 1:76]. Without examining the originals of these documents we cannot tell whether the error was made by the seventeenth-century or the nineteenth-century copyist.)

The inventory, taken 4 October 1644 by Townsend Bishop and Jeffrey Massey, totalled £213 19s., of which £47 10s. 10d. was real estate: a farm, 80 acres, meadow, 20 acres, £14 3s. 4d.; another farm, 75 acres, £7; and 26 acres, 2 houses, 2 acres [and] a quarter of salt marsh, £26 7s. 6d. [EPR 1:458; EQC 1:76].

On 10 April 1668 Anne Knight deeded eighty acres at Royalside, bequeathed to her by her late husband "Richard Ingerson," to their sons "John and Nathaniel Ingerson" with the consent of her now husband John Knight Sr. of Newbury [EQC 4:109].
found on ancestry.com

JOSIAH ADKINS 1620-1690

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of William Elmer, son of John Elmer, son of William Elmer, son of William Elmer, son of Mary Adkins (Elmer), daughter of Thomas Adkins, son of Josiah Adkins.]
Middleton, Connecticut, Old Church - Most likely the one Josiah helped to build and attend. Built in 1650 in downtown Middletown.


Notes from Barbara Atkins Forster's research:

Hi, hope I have this right- John Rastus Hale is my great grandfather, his mother was Susan P. Smith, her mother was Mildred Atkins, her father was William Atkins, his parents were Thomas and Mathuza Atkins his father was Josiah Atkins B. 1722, his father was Benjamin Atkins, 1682, his father was Josiah Atkins, B. 1630 married to Elizabeth Wetmore. My Hale's are from Tennessee then South. Texas
Candace Hale (Lake)

American Marriages Before 1699
Name: Josiah Atkins


Spouse: Elizabeth Whetmore
Marriage Date: 8 October 1673

Marriage Place: Middletown, Connecticut

Connecticut Town Death Records, pre-1870 (Barbour Collection)
Name: Josiah Atkins Sr. [Josiah Adkins Sr.]


Death Date: 12 September 1690 Death Location: Middletown

U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900
Name: Josiah Adkins
Birth Place: Connecticut

Birth Year: 1630


Spouse Name: Elizabeth Wetmore
Spouse Birth Place: Connecticut

Spouse Birth Year: 1648

Marriage Year: 1673


Number Pages: 1

Josiah Atkins found in Passenger and Immigration Index 1500's-1900's published by Frederick A. Virkus Immigrants to America before 1750.

Listed in First Puritan Settlers of Connecticut page 110
Listed in Families of Ancient New Haven Vol 1 page 467
Listed in Lineages of Hereditary Society Members 1600's Lineage book of the N.S. D. A. R. Vol II page 15 Vol III pg 14 Vol I pg 15
Listed in Founders and Patriots of America Index pg 6
Listed in The Complete Mayflower Descendant Vol V pg 21
Josiah D Atkins listed in same book Vol X pg 34 and pg 93

Revolutionary War Veteran from Waterbury Unit

Came from Wales, ca 1633.
Born possibly in 1620-30 possibly born in Waltham, South England. Josiah Adkins, the first of his family in the country, possibly coming here as a child with his father William. What date is not exactly known.

He settled at first in the East Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut, where he married Elizabeth Andrews having three children. After his wife died he moved to Middletown and married Elizabeth Wetmore (Whitmore).


When he came to Middletown, the town gave him four acres of meadowland near Robert Johnson's farm, next to John Stow, Senior. Other sources say it was South Staddle Hill district.
and then Wethersfield area, where his eldest son and daughter married and remained, the second son going to Milford.

Sources: Commemorative Biographical Record: Hartford Connecticut FHL 974.62 D3cpt2p 1419 The Compendium of American Genealogy by FA Virkus FHL 973 D2vf p 90 Early Puritan Settlers by RR Hinman FHL 974.6D2hra

The Josiah Adkins Family of Connecticut Book by Donald Lines Jacobus, M.A., F.A.S.G. states:


"an early but not original settler in Hartford, Connecticut, married first Elizabeth Andrews, sister of Edward Andrews of Hartford. ....... Edwards' will signed July 23, 1673, after providing for his wife and children (unnamed), gave to my brother (in-law) Josiah Adkins ten acres of the land I bought of Wm. Howlton the North side of it, which shall be to his children which were the children of my sister" (Manwaring's Digest, 1:173) "The reason for limiting the passing of the land to the children of Josiah Adkins by Andrew was doubtless because Adkins was on the point of marrying again and might have other children not related to Edward Andrews. Josiah Adkins, in fact moved to Middletown, Connecticut, and married there a second time, a little over two months after Andrews made his will."

A Digest of the Early Connecticut Probate Records 1687-1695 Page 89


Name: Josiah Adkins


Location: Middletown Invt. oe 67-10-00 Taken January 1, 1690-1 by Nathaniel Stowe, John Hall, Sen., Samuel Hall. Legatees: (these were only the seven children by his second marriage, then aged 3 to 16). Solomon 12, Josiah 10, Benjamin 8 and Ephraim 6, and his three daughters, Sarah 16, Abigail 14 and Elizabeth 3.

Will dated September 1, 1690 . I Josiah Adkins of Middletown do leave this as my last Will and Testament; I give to my wife Elizabeth Adkins my House, Houselott and Stock, for her life time, and to be at her dispose at her death, only willing her not to dispose of it but to my children then surviving. I give to my 4 sons, Solomon, Josiah, Benjamin and Ephraim, my Boggy Meadow and Swamp, equally to be divided between them. My Will is that after my wife's decease all Moveables in the House shall be equally divided amongst my 3 daughters, Sarah, Abigail and Elizabeth. I give to my other 3 children, to whom I have formerly given according to my ability, that is to Thomas, Samuel and Elizabeth Gilman, 10 shillings apiece. I request my Brother Nathaniel Stowe and Mr. Thomas Warde to be Overseers. Witness: Daniel Hurlbut, John Hall, Sen. Josiah X Adkins Ls. (These obviously the older children, sons and daughters of his Andrews wife; and since she was sister of a man born about 1628, her birth may be placed about 1630. Of these children, the births of Thomas and Elizabeth (Gilman) have to be placed as early as 1650-1652, since the eldest child of each was born 1672. These dates all fit together well, and we must conclude that Josiah was around 45 when he married the second time and around 60 when his youngest child was born. )

From the book 'The history of Long Hill' located on ancestry.com


Atkins - the name in New England first appears as copied from an old record:


1) Joseph Atkins of Roxbury (Massachusetts) married a Dudley in the year 1630.

2) Abraham Atkins Boston 1642

3) Matthew Atkins Boston (freeman) 1673

4) Thomas Atkins (brother of Josiah) Hartford, East River married 1688

5) Thomas Atkins Boston (freeman) 1690

Josiah Atkins - (brother of Thomas) married Elizabeth daughter of Thomas Wetmore, Sen of Middletown, October 8, 1673 (then it list the children and dates they were born) The town gave him four acres of meadow land near Robert Johnson's farm next to John Stow, Sen land. Josiah Atkins died September 1, 1691. Estate 67 Franks 10 Shillings.

It then goes on to talk about each of the children. see their pages for their section.

Page 89

Name: Josiah Adkins


Location: Middletown
Invt. œ67-10-00. Taken 1st January, 1690-1, by Nathaniel Stowe, John Hall, sen., Samuel Hall. The legatees: Solomon Adkins age 12 years, Josiah 10, Benjamin 8, Ephraim 5, Sarah 16, Abigail 14, Elizabeth 3 years old. Will dated 1st September, 1690.



I Josiah Adkins of Middletown do leave this as my last Will and Testament: I give to my wife Elizabeth Adkins my House, Houselott and Stock, for her life time, and to be at her dispose at her death, only willing her not to dispose of it but to my Children then surviving. I give to my 4 sons, Solomon, Josiah, Benjamin and Ephraim, my Boggy Meadow and Swamp, equally to be divided between them. My Will is that after my wife's decease all Moveables in the House shall be equally divided amongst my 3 daughters, Sarah, Abigail and Elizabeth. I give to my other 3 Children, to whom I have formerly given according to my ability, that is, to Thomas, Samuel and Elizabeth Gilman, 10 Shillings apeice. I request my Brother Nathaniel Stowe and Mr. Thomas Warde to be Overseers.
Witness: Daniel Hurlbut, John Hall sen.
Josiah X Adkins. Ls.
Court Record, Page 23--5 March, 1690-1: Will exhibited. Adms. to the Widow Elizabeth, with the Will annexed.

A DIGEST OF THE EARLY CONNECTICUT PROBATE RECORDS.
1687 to 1695.
found on ancestry.com