Thursday, September 22, 2011

HANNAH BENEDICT (CARTER) 1733-1780

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of Hannah Polina Child (Elmer), daughter of Alfred Bosworth Child, son of Hannah Benedict (Child), daughter of Hannah Carter (Benedict), daughter of Hannah Benedict (Carter).]



Carter Street

Birth: December 13, 1733, Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut, USA
Death: February 22, 1780, Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut, USA
Wife of Capt. John Carter [She married John Carter on in October of 1753. 10 Children.

Hannah Benedict Carter can be claimed as a Revolutionary War patriot (DAR records). -courtesy of Mary Harrell-Sesniak]

Burial: Carter Cemetery, New Canaan, Fairfield County, Connecticut, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 11891509
found on findagrave.com

Hannah Benedict Carter made her home a refuge for the soldiers, and died February 21, 1780, from overexertion in their behalf.  Her memory is now honored by the Chapter bearing the name of this patriotic "Foremother."
Daughters of the American Revolution Lineage Book, page 284

Hannah Benedict Carter died February 22, 1780.  Her last work was given to the service of her country, and a Chapter bears the name of the patriotic mother.
Daughters of the American Revolution Lineage Book, page 127

Hannah Benedict Carter, who died in 1780, was one of the many patriotic mothers who gave their lives for liberty. Her memory will ever be cherished by the Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution that bears her name.
Daughters of the American Revolution Lineage Book, page 257

Hannah Benedict Carter was a patriotic mother who died February 21, 1780, from over-exertion for the soldiers.
Daughters of the American Revolution Lineage Book, page 143

Hannah Benedict Carter died February 21, 1780, from over-work for the soldiers and a Chapter of the Daughters now bears the name of this patriot mother.
Daughters of the American Revolution Lineage Book, page 75

Hannah Benedict Carter gave her home and service to the soldiers and died from overexertion in this patriotic work.
Daughters of the American Revolution Lineage Book, page 277

Hannah Benedict Carter is a patriotic mother whose service is memorialized by the Chapter bearing her name.
Daughters of the American Revolution Lineage Book, page 127

Hannah Benedict Carter died 1780, from overwork for the soldiers.  A chapter of the "Daughters," at New Canaan now bears the name of this patriot mother.
Daughters of the American Revolution Lineage Book, page 248

Hannah Benedict Carter (His wife) was a heroine of the revolution.  The chapter of New Canaan, Connecticut, her old home, is named in her honor, and each of her nine children gave her name to a child.  Some of the fine linen she spun is still preserved in the family.
Daughters of the American Revolution Lineage Book, page 253

Hannah Benedict Carter, (1733-1780), was an able helpmeet and the last work of her hands was given to her country.  A chapter of the Daughters of New Canaan, now bears the name of this patriot mother.
Daughters of the American Revolution Lineage Book, page 61

Hannah Benedict Carter Story

Hannah was the daughter of Thomas Benedict, Jr. and Mary Bridgum and the daughter-in-law of Captain Ebenezer Carter, first leader of the Norwalk "Train Band." (Train Bands were common in colonial times. They were the local militia established originally to protect against Indian attacks.)

Hannah was born on December 13, 1733, and lived with her family in Norwalk, Connecticut on what is now known as West Avenue. This home was occupied by nine generations of this family, and this was where Hannah Benedict married Captain John Carter in October 1753. They built their home on what is now Carter Street in New Canaan, Connecticut, opposite to the home of John's father. And it was here that they raised nine children, seven daughters, and two sons. She was beloved by her children and was a devoted mother. All nine children lived to a mature life, married, and in honor of their mother's character and love they all named one of their own daughters Hannah.

Hannah Benedict Carter was a true patriot. She often aided and entertained soldiers. Many military gatherings occurred at their home and in their neighborhood. On February 21, 1780, thirty mounted soldiers arrived at their home to stay overnight. In the morning, Hannah fed them breakfast and then watched from her front stoop as the troop departed.

She was taken very ill from a congestive chill, followed by a cerebral stroke, usually caused by a hemorrhage in the brain. She died a few hours later on Captain John Carter's birthday, February 22, 1780. She was buried on the church hill facing the Congregational Church where her grand-daughter Hannah Carter St. John planted an Elm tree beside her grave and a bed of myrtle around it in 1876. She was later moved to a Carter Street burial ground where she rests today with her husband, Captain John Carter who died in January 1819.






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