Tuesday, August 30, 2011

JOHN COGGSWELL 1591-1669

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of Hannah Polina Child (Elmer), daughter of Polly Barber (Child), daughter of Ichabod Barber, son of Mary Barney (Barber), daughter of Israel Barney, son of Elizabeth Brackett (Barney), daughter of Elizabeth Waldo (Brackett), daughter of Hannah Coggswell (Waldo), daughter of John Coggswell.]

Plaque 1991, Pemaquid Lighthouse at Bristol, Maine, USA
Dedicated by Cogswell Family Association at the sight of the shipwreck of the passengers aboard the "Angel Gabriel".



John Cogswell
John Cogswell, like William Ivory, left a very comfortable existence to come to America. Jameson recounts: "...At the age of twenty-three years he married the daughter of the parish vicar, succeeded to his father's business, and settled down in the old homestead. His parents died soon after his marriage, and he received by inheritance 'The Mylls called Ripond, situate within the Parish of Frome Selwood,' together with the home place and certain personal property. Like his father, he was a manufacturer of woollen fabrics, largely broadcloths and kerseymeres. The superior quality of these manufactures gave to his 'mylls' a favorable reputation, which appears to have been retained to the [1880s]. [In the 1880s,] [t]here are factories occupying much the same locations and still owned by Cogswells, which continue to put upon the markey woollen cloths that in Vienna and elsewhere have commanded the first premiums in the world exhibitions of our times..."[15]

So, with the following sale of their estate and home, they headed for America.

It appears that the family unit which came over definitely included: John [Sr.], Elizabeth (his wife) and their children Elizabeth, Mary, William, Edward and John [Jr.]. (Abigail and Sarah were born in America.) The question marks remain around Phyllis, Alice, Esther and Ruth; of whom there are no more records save their baptisms. At least one of them is the unnamed daughter who remained in England. She had two children and was visited by her brother John on his ill-fated final voyage to London. Jameson claims that eight of the children born in England went to America[15].

John, Sr. and his family sailed from Bristol on 23 May 1635 on the Angel Gabriel. It was shipwrecked off Pemaquid, Maine on 15 August 1635[10,30].
found on ancestry.com

John Cogswell
Mr. Cogswell and his family escaped with their lives, but well drenched by the sea and despoiled of valuables to the amount of five thousand pounds sterling. They were more fortunate than some who sailed with them, whom the angry waves gathered to a watery grave. On leaving England Mr. Cogswell had taken along with him a large tent, which now came into good service. This they pitched, and into it they gathered themselves and such stores as they could rescue from the waves. The darkness of that first night of the Cogswells in America found them housed beneath a tent on the beach. The next day they picked up what more of their goods they could, which had come ashore during the night or lay floating about upon the water. As soon as possible Mr. Cogswell, leaving his family, took passage for Boston. He there made a contract with a certain Capt. Gallup, who commanded a small barque, to sail for Pemaquid and transport his family to Ipswich, Massachusetts. This was a newly settled town to the eastward from Boston, and was called by the Indians, "Aggawam." Two years earlier, March, 1633, Mr. John Winthrop, son of Gov. John Winthrop, with ten others, had commenced a settlement in Aggawam. An act of incorporation was secured August 4, 1634, under the name of Ipswich. The name Ipswich is Saxon, in honor of the Saxon queen Eba, called "Eba's wych," i.e., Eba's house; hence Yppyswich or Ipswich. Some derive it from Gippewich, meaning "little city." In the early records are found the following enactments of the General Court:
found on ancestry.com

The Angel Gabriel and the Great Storm of 1635
The Angel Gabriel and the Great Storm of 1635 August of 1635 had been a fair one for the small settlements which were striving to establish themselves in New England. In the wheel of the year, haying would have just concluded, with the settlers mowing, drying, gathering and storing the hay for the upcoming winter during the hottest, most unforgiving part of summer. Crops would be nearing their peak, nearly ready for the September harvest time. However, for "...[t]he whole of the second week of August the wind had blown from the direction of south-southwest with considerable force..."[110] Suddenly, about midnight on 14 August, the wind changed to the dangerous direction of northeast and soon blew to hurricane strength. The winds blasted the crops in the fields and the small houses of the English settlers.

On the shoreline, the winds and storm surge took the waters to heights that none had ever seen before. Boston suffered through two high tides of twenty feet and "[t]he Narragansett Indians were obliged to climb into the tops of trees to save themselves from the great tide in their region. Many of them failed to do so, and were swallowed up by the surging waters..."[110]

The storm lasted the 5 or 6 hours such hurricanes do and when the storm at last had passed, the settlers who could do so emerged to a changed world. Crops were flattened. Some houses had lost their roofs or were blown down completely. Most incredibly to the colonial senses, entire swathes of trees were snapped in two or blown down completely.

Several ships were lost off the coast of New England, but the most celebrated was the Angel Gabriel - a bark of some 240 tons and 12-16 cannon (depending upon the source of information). From the letters of "John Aubrey, the celebrated antiquary of Wiltshire" the Angel Gabriel was originally built by Sir Charles Snell for Sir Walter Raleigh, "for the designe for Guiana, which cost him the manor of Yatton Regnell, the farm of Easton Piers, Thornhill, and the Church-lease of Bp. Cannins, which ship upon Sir Walter Raleigh's attander was forfeited." [Aubrey's Letters; Vol. 2, p. 514; Mss.; Bodleian Library; Oxford, England]

A wonderful account of the voyage of the Angel Gabriel and its sailing partner the James (and the storm which befell them) comes in excerpts from the Journal of The Reverend Richard Mather, who was traveling on the James. The two ships sailed together for a great deal of the voyage. Based upon the several different sources for excerpts for this journal, the journey unfolded as written below. The voyage itself took 12 weeks and 2 days, from the time they left King's Road in Bristol on 23 May 1635 until the James landed in Boston, MA on 17 August 1635. [Mather]

23 May 1635: The Angel Gabriel, Captain Andrews, Master; the James (220 tons), Captain Taylor, Master; the Mary (80 tons), the Bess (or Elizabeth) and the Diligence (150 tons) left King's Road, Bristol, England en route for New England and Newfoundland. [MaryJohn]

24 May to 2 June 1635: They then lay at anchor for these 11 days before departing. [Mather]

27 May 1635: "...While at anchor, Captain Taylor, Mr. Maud, Nathaniel Wale, Barnabas Fower, Thomas Armitage, and myself, Richard Mather went aboard the Angel Gabriel. When we came there we found diverse passengers, and among them some loving and godly Christians that were glad to see us. The next day the visit was returned..."[Mather]

Thursday, 4 June 1635: "...the wind serving us, wee set sayle and began our sea voyage with glad hearts, yt God had loosed us from our long stay wherein we had been holden, and with hope and trust that Hee would graciously guide us to the end of our journey..." Meanwhile, the Angel Gabriel had an omen of things to come: "...And even at our setting out we yt were in the James had experience of God's gracious providence over us, in yt the Angel Gabriel haling home one of her ancres, had like, being carried by the force of the tide, to have fallen foule upon ye forept of our ship, w&ch made all the mariners as well as passengers greatly afraid, yet by guidance of God and his care over us, she passed by without touching so much as a cable or a cord, and so we escaped yt danger..." [Mather]

4 to 6 June 1635: The ships spent three full days tacking between King's Road and Lundy [Mather] Island, which lies only 10 miles out in the Bristol Channel [LonelyPlanet].
6 to 9 June1635: The ships lay at anchor at Lundy Island for three more days, stuck there by "adverse seas and wind". [Mather]

9 June 1635: It only took this one day to sail from Lundy Island to Milford Haven, Pembroke co., Wales. [Mather]

10 to 22 June 1635: However, once at Milford Haven, they lay at anchor there for another 12 days - due first to rough seas and then to a lack of wind. While Mather and the other passengers chafed at the constant delays, "the day was more comfortable to us all in regard to ye company of many godly Christians from ye Angel Gabriel, and from other vessels lyin in the haven with us, who, wanting means and home, were glad to come to us, and we were also glad of their company, and had all of us a very comfortable day, and were much refreshed in the Lord." [Mather]

Sunday, 14 June 1635: "...Still lying at Milford Haven. Mr. Maud, Mathews Michael of the James and many of the passengers of the Angel Gabriel went to church on shore at a place called Nangle, where they heard two comportable sermons made by an ancient grave minister living at Pembroke, whose name is Mr. Jessop. Ps XCI-11 "For He shall give his angels charge over Thee to keep Thee in all thy ways..." [Mather]

Monday, 22 June 1635: The small fleet finally sets sail from the English coast, bound for America. This was the last sight of land for many weeks and the last sight of home for nearly all the emigrants.

23 June 1635: The Master of the James decided to stay with the Angel Gabriel, since both ships were bound for New England and not Newfoundland. They quickly lost sight of the smaller, faster Mary, Bess and Diligence on the evening of the 23rd. Mather's thoughts on the Angel Gabriel were: "...The Angel Gabriel is a strong ship and well furnished with fourteene or sixteene pieces of ordnance, and therfore oure seamen rather desired her company; but yet she is slow in sailing, and therefore wee went sometimes with trhee sayles less than wee might have done, yt , so we might not overgoe her..." [Mather]

Wednesday, 24 June 1635: "...We saw abundance of porpuyses leaping and playing about our ship". And wee spent some time that day in pursuing with the Angel Gabriel what wee supposed was a Turkish pirate, but could not overtake her..." [Mather]

Monday, 29 June 1635: The seamen decided to kill one of the porpoises for sport. They had originally planned upon killing it on 28 June, but that day was the Sabbath. Out of respect for the passengers' faith, they waited until the following day. Mather's description of this follows: "...The seeing him haled into the ship like a swyne from ye stye to the tressele, and opened upon ye decke in viewe of all our company, was wonderful to us all, and marvellous merry sport and delightful to our women and children. So good was our God unto us in affordin us the day before, spiritual refreshing to our soules, and ye day morning also delightful recreation to our bodyes, at ye taking and opening of ye huge and strange fish..." [Mather]

That afternoon, Captain Taylor, The Reverend Mather and Matthew Mitchell went aboard the Angel Gabriel. "...They found much sickness aboard and two cases of small pox, but the latter were recovered. They had supper with the ship's master and had good cheese, boiled mutton, roasted turkey and good sack..." [MaryJohn]

Saturday, 4 July 1635: "...This day ye sea was very rough...Some were very seasicke, but none could stand or go upon ye decke because of the tossing and tumbling of the ship...This day (July 4) we lost sight of the Angel sayling slowly behind us, and we never saw her again any more..." [Mather]

Sunday, 2 August 1635: "...And ye wind blew with a coole and comfortable gale at south all day, which carried us away with great speed towards or journeyes end..." [Mather]

3 August 1635: "...But lest wee should grow secure and neglect ye Lord through abundance of prosperity, or wise and loving God was pleased on Monday morning about three of ye clock, when wee were upon the coast of land, to exercise us with a sore storme and tempest of wind and rain, so yt many of us passengers with wind and rain were raised out of our beds, and our seamen were forced to let down all ye sayles, and ye ship was so tossed with fearfull mountains and valleys of water, as if wee should have beene overwhelmed and swallowed up. But ye lasted not long, for at or poore prayers, ye Lord was please to magnify his mercy in assuaging ye winds and seas againe about sun rising..." [Mather]

8 August 1635: The James makes land at Menhiggin [possibly Monhegan, ME?] [Mather]

14 August 1635: At 10 o'clock at night they dropped anchor at the Isle of Shoales and there "slept sweetly the night until daybreak". [Mather]

15 August 1635: The Great Storm hits. The James is anchored off the Isles of Shoals, the Angel Gabriel off Pemaquid, ME. Mather's description of the storm: "...ye Lord sent Forth a most terrible Storme of rain, and ye Angel Gabriel lying in at anchor at Pemaquid, was burst in pieces, and cast away in ye Storme and most of ye cattle and other goodes with one seaman and three or four passengers did also perish therein, besides two of ye passengers died by ye way. Ye rest having lives given ym. ' The Angel Gabriel was the only vessel which miscarried with passengers from Old England to New, so signally did the Lord in his Providence watch over the Plantation of New England."

Perley gives an excellent account of how the James survived the hurricane: "...The ship James...was near the Isles of Shoals when the gale came on. The vessel was tun into a strait among the islands, the master thinking probably that he had secured a harbor; but when well in he found that it was an unprotected passage. The anchors were lowered, and all three of them were lost, the violent and almost irresistible wind snapping the cables and leaving the anchors at the bottom of the deep. The Bessel was then placed under sail and run before the northeast gale, but neither canvas nor ropes held, and she dashed through the foaming crests on toward the rocky shore of Piscataqua. Instant destruction seemed inevitable. But, lo! As if a mighty overruling hand controlled the angry elements, when within a cable's length of the ledges, the wind suddenly veered to the northwest, and the ship was blown away from the deadly rocks back toward the islands again...they were plowing along toward rocks as dangerous as those they had just escaped. When about the strike in a last fatal plunge a part of the mainsail was let out, which caused the vessel to veer a little, and she weathered the rocks, almost touching them as she plunged past. The desired harbor was finally reached in safety..." [Perley]

Mather records that the reaction of the passengers to this stroke of fortune was thus: "...When news was brought to us in the gun room that the danger was past, oh how our hearts did then relent and melt within us! And how we burst into tears of joy amongst ourselves, in love onto our gracious God, and admiration of his kindness in granting to his poor servants such an extraordinary and miraculous deliverance. His holy name be blessed forever..." [Mather]

At Pemaquid, there was no such miracle for the Angel Gabriel. She broke up on the rocks. Luckily, only 3-5 of the passengers and crew lost their lives but all who survived lost virtually everything they owned. A bark commanded by Captain Gallop made several trips, eventually conveying all the survivors to Boston, Suffolk county, Massachusetts.

16 August 1635: "...This day we went directly before the wind, and had a delight all along the coast as we went, in viewing Cape Anne, the bay of Saugust, the bay of Salem, Marblehead and other places and came to anchor at low tide at Nantasket, in a most pleasant harbor, like to such I had never seen, amongst a great many lands on everyside. After the evening exercise, when it was flowing tide again, we set sail and came the night to anchor again before Boston and so rested that night with glad and thankful hearts that God had put an end to our long journey, being 1,000 leagues, that is 3,000 English miles, over one of the greatest seas of the world. First of all it was very safe and healthful to us, for though we were in a ship with 100 passengers, besides 23 seamen, 23 cows and heifers, 3 suckling calves and 8 mareas, yet not one these died by the way, neither person nor cattell, but came all alive to land, and many of the cattell in better condition than when they first entered the ship. And most of the passengers are in as good health as every and none better than my own family, and my weak wife and little Joseph as well as any other:. They had seasickness but were spared the fever, small pox and other diseases. Richard Beacon lost his right hand in the storm and one woman and her small child had scurvy, "we all conceived to be for want of walking and stirring of her body upon her bed. We had a comfortable variety of food, seeing we were not tied to the ships diet, but did victual ourselveds, we had no want of good and wholesome beer and bread, and as our land stomachs grew wearly of ship diet of salt fish and salt beef and the like, we had liberty to change for other food which might sort better with our health and stomachs and therefore sometimes we used bacon and buttered peas, sometimes buttered bag-pudding made curraynes and raisings, and sometimes drink pottage of beer and oatmeal and sometimes water pottage well buttered..." [Mather]

17 August 1635: The James manages to make it to Boston Harbor proper with "her sails rent in sunder, and split in pieces, as if they had been rotten ragges." [Mather]

Mather summed up his trip with "On June 2 we lost sight of our old English coast, until August 8 where we made land again at Menhiggin, it was but six weeks and five days yet from our first entering the ship in King road on May 23 to our landing in Boston on August 17, it was 12 weeks and 2 days. For we lay at anchor in King Roade 11 days before we even set sail and 3 days at Lundy and 12 days at Milford and spent 3 days tacking between Kind Roade and Lundy, one day between Lundy and Milford and 8 days between Menhiggin and Boston. Again, let our gracious God be blessed forever. Amen..." [Mather]

John, Sr. took all he owned: "...several farm and household servants [one of whom was Samuel Haines], an amount of valuable furniture, farming implements, housekeeping utensils, and a considerable sum of money..." aboard the Angel Gabriel[34]. After the wreck, he and his family took to Ipswich whatever they could salvage from the water. John, Sr. lost the equivalent of £5000 sterling[15]; yet some say he salvaged nearly that much from the shipwreck[31,32,33].

Some accounts have John, Sr. and his son, John, Jr. walking from Pemaquid, Maine to Boston, Massachusetts to summon help after the hurricane. Other accounts imply that Captain Gallup's ship was already at Pemaquid, Maine and the Cogswells hired him to take them and their belongings to Ipswich, Essex county, Massachusetts.
found on ancestry.com

Biographical Sketch
BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW
Containing Life Sketches Citizens of of Leading Essex County Massachusetts
JOHN COGSWELL 1592-1669

On September 10, 1615, John Cogswell married Elizabeth, daughter of the Rev. William and Phillis Thompson; and in May, 1635, he with his family sailed for America on board the "Angel Gabriel," commanded by Captain Andrews. The ship, which was wrecked on the coast of Maine in August, 1635, brought other passengers, who settled in Essex; and among them were John and Thomas Burnham, ancestors of the Burnham family of this town. John Cogswell settled in Essex, and engaged in the manufacture of woollen cloth. He owned three hundred and seventy-five acres of land; and the family homestead, where eight generations have resided, is a part of his original tract. He died November 29, 1669; and his wife died June 2, i6676.

Their children were as follows: a daughter who married in England and lived in London; Mary, who in 1649 married Godfrey Armitage; William, who was born in England in 1619; John, born in 1622; Hannah, who in 1652 married Deacon Waldo; Abigail, who married Thomas Clark; Edward, born in 1629; Sarah, who married Simeon Tuttle, and died in 1692; and Elizabeth, who on July 31, 1657, wedded Nathaniel Masterson.
found on ancestry.com

John Cogswell coming to America
Cogswell derives its name from the town of Coggeshall, Essex, England. It was a Roman town named Canonium, then called Coed Garr's Hall under the Saxons, then Coggeshael under Canute the Dane and finally Coggeshall. Edward Coggswell was a wool merchant. He passed this on to John Sr. John sold his inhereted property and moved his family to New Englan in 1635. He married Elizabeth the daughter of the parish vicar Rev William Thompson. They left on in 22 Jun 1635 from Bristol with 4 other ships, the James , the Bess, the Mary, the Diligence, and John's ship the Angel Gabriel a 220 ton vessel with 12 cannons built by Sir Charles Snell origin-ally for Sir Walter Raliegh. Only the Angel Gabriel and the James went to New England the rest went somewhere else. They anchored off Maine in Aug of 1635, the James off Isle of Shoals and the Angel Gabriel off Pemaquid Me. A nor-easter came up on 15 Aug 1635 that wrecked the Angel Gabriel. John was able to salvage almost 5,000 pounds sterling of his property. The storm did considerable dammage to crops and buildings in the area. They settled in what is now Ipswich Ma. They arrived in Boston on 17 Aug 1635. John bought 300 acres on the Chebacco River and continued on being a wool merchant. He was also a town leader. He and his wife are buried at the old cemetery on Rt 133 in Ipswich next to the White Elephant Antique Shop.
found on ancestry.com

John Cogswell, (Princess Dianna Spencer's 10th great-grandfather, making her my 10th cousin once removed.)
John Cogswell, son of Edward, was born in 1592 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. At age 23, he succeeded to his fathers' business and settled down in the old homestead. On September 10, 1615 in Westbury Leigh, Wilts, John married Elizabeth Thompson. She was born about 1594 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. His parents died soon after his marriage, and he received his inheritance, "The Mylls called Ripond, situate within the Parish of Frome Selwood," together with the home place and certain personal property.

Like his father, he was a manufacturer of wollen fabrics, largely broadcloths and kerseymeres. The superior quality of these manufacturers gave his "mylls" a favorable reputation, which appears to have been retained to the present day. There are factories occupying much the same locations and still owned by the Cogswells, which continue to put on the market wollen cloths that in Vienna and elsewhere have commanded the first premium in the world exhibitions of our times (1880s?). John Cogswell doubtless found, in London, a market for his manufactures. He may have had a commission house in that city, which would account for his being called, as he sometimes has been, a London merchant. John Cogswell immigrated to the Massachusetts Colony on the ship "Angel Gabriel" from Bristol, England May 23, 1635. He brought his wife and 8 children with him, leaving one daughter in England. He brought his apprentice of 9 years, Samuel Haines, with him on the voyage which lasted 10 weeks. (See below.)

John Cogswell was the third original settler of Ipswich, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Mr. John Cogswell had lands granted him there as appears from the records; under the date of 1635. The fact that he was designated "Mr." at that date, and the considerable amount of land granted him indicate that he was a man of good social standing in society. The records of about that date further show that Cornelius Waldo was Mr. Coggswell's farmer. He was made Freeman there March 3, 1636. On March 26, 1641, John Cogswell of Ipswich mortgaged to Mr. William Hubbard his farm of about 300 acres at Chebacco River, with the houses; acknowledged April 5, 1641, before Richard Saltonstall.

The Cogswells were also involved in an attempt to prevent the execution of Goodwife Proctor in the Salem witch trials. "Five members of the Cogswell family were among the twenty prominent people who signed the petition drawn up by the Rev. John Wise on behalf of Goodwife Proctor, who stood accused of witchcraft. Mary Warren alleged that she had been threatened and abused by Goodwife proctor, and that she had seen apparitions of people who had long since been murdered by the wife of John Proctor. This evidence prevailed and the good woman was sentenced to death."

John Cogswell died on November 29, 1669 at Ipswich, Massachusetts. He is buried at the Phipps Street Burying Ground in Ipswich, Massachusetts. Elzabeth Cogswell died on June 2, 1676 at Ipswich, MassachusettsA. She is also buried in Old North Graveyard, Ipswich, Massachusetts.

The "Haines Family," by W.L. Holman, 1962, tells the story of Samuel Haines, John Cogswell's apprentice who came with John and his family when they immigrated: "At the age of 15, Samuel was apprenticed to John Cogswell, in Westbury, County, Wilts, a fuller or clothmaker, for 10 years. In 1635, Cogswell came to New England on the "Angel Gabriel," from Kings Road, Bristol, 4 June, and from Milford Haaven, 22 June, and with him came his apprentice. After a voyage of 10 weeks, the ship foundered off the coast of Maine in a bad storm, but most passengers managed to get ashore, and were brought up to Boston, Massachusetts, in Goodman Gallup's Bark. From Boston, Gallup sailed cogswell and his party to Ipswich, Massachusetts, and here in Ipswich, Haines lived for a year and then went up to Northam (later Dover, New Hampshire)."

In 1676, age about 65, Samuel Haines testified in litigation between the Cogswells about property brought over on the ill-fatedship..."The desposition of Samuell Haines Sen aged 65 years or thereabouts. This deponent testifyeth and saith, that I lived with Mr John Cogswell, Sen.: in old England about nine years a servant with him, and came over along with him to news England in the ship (called the Angell Gabriell) and were present wih him when my master Cogswell suffered shipwrecke at Pemmyquid, which was about fourty-one yeares agoe the last August when the ship were cast away. I the said Haines doe remember that there were saved then out of my maisters good a Good Quantity of Good Household goods both feather beds and Bedding and also a good quantity of brass and Pewter and also severall Brass pans. Furthermore I Doe Remember that my maister had a turkey worked Carpett in old England which he commonly used to lay upon his parlour table, and this carpet was put aboard amongst my maisters goods and Came safe ashore to the Best of my Remembrance. All which goods together with some provisions wich were saved when Goodman Galhup of Boston Brought to Ipswitch in his barke for my master (Except some of them wich the vessel Could not hold) and I the said Deponent came along with him in the vessel from Pemmyquid, and lived with my maister Cogswell in Ipswitch the same yeare following. And also I Remember that my maister had two maires and two Cowes who were shipt aboarde a ship at South Hampton In old England and came safe ashore to new England that same summer as we came here, and were delivered to my maister; I Doe further testifye that about 4 yeare and a half after)) I brought over for the use of my maister Cogswell between fourscore and an hundredth pounds worth of goods, in severall particulars which were delivered to him. And Furthermore I doe very well remember that my marster Cogswell had three sonses name were William wich were about 14 years of age then, and the second sonne were called John wich were about twelve years of age then, and the third sonnes name was Edward wich were about six years of age at that time and further saith not." Samuel Haines, Senr came and made oath to all ye above written the fist of December 1676. Before me Richard Martyn Commissr"

Another deposition in the suit is printed in the NEHGS "Register," Vol 23, pg. 154, reproduced from Paper No. 554, Vol. 39, "Massachusetts Judicial "Records," Cogswell vs. Cogswell: "Deposition of William Thompson aged about 28 years testifieth that I lived with my uncle and aunt Mr. John Cogswell, Senior of Ipswich, and Mrs. Cogswell about 16 years, and I did frequently see a turkie work carpet which they had, and I have heard them say that it was theirs in Old England and used to lie upon their parlour table there, and that they brought it with them into this country when they came, and being this last winter in Old England I heard my father Doctor Samuel Thompson say that he did well remember that my uncle and aunt had a turkie work carpett weh used to lye upon their parlour table in Old England, and took it away with them. 26 May 1677.

"The deposition of another apprentice of John Cogswell, William Furber, Sr., age about 62, collaborated Haines' testimony and other depositions were presented. The case is called William Cogswell vs. John Cogswell of Ipswich, 22 Mar. 1677, Massachusetts Archives, 39: 534-535. The Winthrop Papers and Mather's Journal contains details regarding the shipwreck of the "Angel Gabriel"

Other Sources:
"Ancestry of Bob and Mary Beth Wheeler" at www.ancestry.com.
"Ipswich Court Records and Files," in the "Essex Antiquarian," Vol 8, 1904, p. 3.
"Ipswich In The Massachusetts Bay Colony", by Thomas Franklin Waters, The Ipswich Historical Society, 1905; pgs. 290-291.
"History of Hancock"; Tuttle in History of Hancock , from http://members.aol.com/_ht_a/dcurtin1/gene/gen_cog.htm
"Stories, Publications, and Memories", at http://www.ancestry.com/
found on ancestry.com

John(3) Cogswell was the immigrant ancestor in this Cogswell line. He was born in 1592 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. He was baptized on April 7, 1592. He died on November 29, 1669 at Ipswich, Massachusetts. He is buried in Old North Graveyard, Ipswich, Massachusetts. On September 10, 1615 in Westbury Leigh, Wilts, John married Elizabeth Thompson. She was born circa 1594 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. She died on June 2, 1676 at Ipswich, Massachusetts. She is also buried in Old North Graveyard, Ipswich, Massachusetts.

At age 23, he succeeded to his fathers' business and settled down in the old homestead. His parents died soon after his marriage, and he received his inheritance, "The Mylls called Ripond, situate within the Parish of Frome Selwood," together with the home place and certain personal property. Like his father, he was a manufacturer of wollen fabrics, largely broadcloths and kerseymeres. The superior quality of these manufacturers gave his "mylls" a favorable reputation, which appears to have been retained to the present day. There are factories occupying much the same locations and still owned by the Cogswells, which continue to put on the market wollen cloths that in Vienna and elsewhere have commanded the first premium in the world exhibitions of our times (1880s?).

John Cogswell doubtless found, in London, a market for his manufactures. He may have had a commission house in that city, which would account for his being called, as he sometimes has been, a London merchant.

Mrs. Cogswells' mother was Phillis--- and her father was the Rev. William Thompson, vicar of Westbury from 1603 to his death in 1623. About twenty years after their marriage, with a family of nine children about them, and having the accumulations of a prosperous business, Mr. and Mrs. Cogswell determined to emigrate to America. The particular reasons which led them to leave England may have been much the same that influenced others in their times. It appears that early in 1635, Mr. Cogswell made sale of his "mylls" and other real estate, and soon after, with his wife, eight children, and all their personal effects, embarked at Bristol, May 23, 1635, for New England. Their passage was long and disastrous. Their arrival in America was after a most unexpected fashion. Having reached the shores of New England, they were landed unceremoniously at a place called Pemaquid, in Maine, being washed ashore from the broken decks of their ship "Angel Gabriel " which went to pieces in the frightful gale of August 15, 1635, when such a "sudden dismal storm of wind and rain came as had never been known before by white man or Indian." Traces of this storm remained for years.

John Cogswell and his wife Elizabeth settled at Ipswich, and had lands granted him there as appears from the records; under the date of 1635, is this entry:

"Granted to Mr. John Cogswell three hundred acres of land at the further Chebacco, Having the river on the southeast, the land of Will White on ye Northwest and a Creek Coming out of the river towards Will Whites farme on the Northeast. Bounded also on the west with a creek and a little brooke. Also there was granted to him a percell of ground containing eight acres, upon part whereof the said John Coggswell hath Built an house, it being in ye corner lott in Bridge Streete and has goodman Bradstreet houselott on ye s.e. The was also granted to him six acres of Ground late mr. John Spencers. Butting upon the river on the southeast having a lott of Edmund Gardners' on the Northeast and a lott of Edmund Saywords on the Southwest wch six acres of ground teh sd John Coggswell hath sold to John Perkins teh younger his heirs and assigns."

The fact that he was designated "Mr." at that date, and the considerable amount of land granted him indicate that he was a man of good social standing in society. The records of about that date further show that Cornelius Waldo was Mr. Coggswell's farmer.

The Cogswells were also involved in an attempt to prevent the execution of Goodwife Proctor in the Salem witch trials. According to Ipswich In The Massachusetts Bay Colony, 290-291, by Thomas Franklin Waters, The Ipswich Historical Society, 1905: "Five members of the Cogswell family were among the twenty prominent people who signed the petition drawn up by the Rev. John Wise on behalf of Goodwife Proctor, who stood accused of witchcraft. Mary Warren alleged that she had been threatened and abused by Goodwife proctor, and that she had seen apparitions of people who had long since been murdered by the wife of John Proctor. This evidence prevailed and the good woman was sentenced to death."

Mrs. Cogswell survived her husband but a few years. She was a woman of sterling qualities and dearly loved by all who knew her. Side by side in the old churchyard in Ipswich have slept for more than three hundred years, the mortal remains of this godly pair, whose childhood was passed near the banks of the river Avon; who leaving behind the tender associations of the Old World, came with their children to aid in rearing on these shores a pure Christian state. They did greater work than they knew, died in the faith of the Gospel, and while their graves are unmarked by monument of stone, their souls are safe in heaven, their memory blessed, and their names honored by a posterity in numbers second only to that of Abraham.

John and Elizabeth Cogswell had the following children:-

daughter(4); she married, lived in London, and was the only child of John Cogswell who did not come to America
Mary(4); born circa 1617 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; died in Boston, Massachusetts.
William(4); born 1619
John(4); born 1622
Phyllis(4); Baptized July 1624; probably died young.
Hannah(4); born circa 1624
Abigail(4); born circa 1626
Edward(4); born 1629, in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England.
Alice(4); baptized 1632; she probably died young
Ruth(4); baptized 1633; she probably died young
Sarah Cogswell; born circa 1632.
Elizabeth; born 1635

3.William(4); born 1619, in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Baptized, 1619 in Westbury Parish Church. died December 15, 1700

4. John(4); born 1622, in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Baptized, July 25, 1622 in Westbury Parish Church.

6. Hannah(4) born circa 1624, in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Baptized, April 26, 1626 in Westbury Parish Church. died December 25, 1704 in Charleston, Massachusetts. Buried in Phipps Street burying ground, Charlestown, Massachusetts.

7. Abigail(4) born circa 1626, in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Baptized, 1627. Died in Ipswich, Massachusetts. Married Thomas Clarke circa 1646. Child:- 11. Sarah Cogswell(4)born circa 1632; married Simon Tuttle in 1663.

12. Elizabeth(4); born 1635, in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England.
found on ancestry.com

Ipswich Property
Excerpt from Genealogy on Robert Andrews:

John Cogswell, mentioned, settled at Ipswich, and had lands granted him there as appears from the records; under the date of 1635, is this entry:

Granted to Mr. John Cogswell three hundred acres of land at the further Chebacco, hauing the River on the southeast, the land of Willm White on ye Northwest and a Creek Coming out of the Riuer towards willm whites farme on the northeast. Bounded also on the west with a creeke and a little brooke. Also there was granted to him a percell of ground containing eight acres, upon part whereof the said John Coggswell hath Built an house, it being in ye corner lott in Bridge Streete and has goodman Bradstreete houselott on ye s.e.

The was also granted to him six acres of Ground late mr. John Spencers, Butting vpon the river on the south east haueing a lott of Edmund Gardners on the north east and a lott of Edmund Saywords on the south west wch six acres of ground the sd John Coggswell hath sold to John Perkins the younger his heirs and assigns.

The fact that he was designated "Mr." at that date, and the considerable amount of land granted him indicate that he was a man of good social standing in society.

The records of about that date further show that Cornelius Waldo was Mr. Coggswell's farmer.
found on ancestry.com

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