Friday, August 10, 2012

SARAH BEBBINGTON EDGELEY (PARKER) 1835-1899

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Joseph Parker, son of Sarah Bebbington Edgeley (Parker).]







Burial: Ogden City Cemetery, Ogden,Weber County,Utah, USA - Plot: A-3-6-5W

Birth: February 19, 1835, England
Death: May 7, 1899, Riverdale, Weber County, Utah, USA

Born in Bulkeley, Cheshire, England the daughter of Sarah Bebbington and William Edgeley. She crossed the plains in 1854 with the Robert L. Campbell Company. She is identified as Sarah Bebbington when crossing with several Bebbingtons who were certainly relatives. She was married to William Cope Parker the 13th of May 1855 in Salt Lake City, Utah and they were sealed at the endowment house the 29th of August 1863. She is the mother of 13 children.

SARAH BEBBINGTON EDGELEY PARKER
BIRTHDATE: 19 February 1835, Bulkeley, Cheshire, England
DEATH: 07 May 1899, Riverdale, Weber, Utah
PARENTS: William Edgeley and Sarah Bebbington Edgeley
PIONEER: September 1854 by wagon Robert Campbell Company
SPOUSE: William Cope Parker
MARRIED: 13 May 1855, Salt Lake City, Utah
DEATH: 27 April 1917, Riverdale, Utah

CHILDREN:
William Henry, 10 January 1856;
Sarah Jane, 22 April 1857;
George William (twin), 19 February 1859;
Mary (twin), 19 February 1859;
Thomas, 31 December 1860;
Elizabeth, 18 February 1863;
Joseph, 20 August 1864;
John, 03 October 1866;
Richard, 31 July 1867;
Edwin Bebbington, 18 June 1870;
Robert, 08 December 1872;
James William, 02 February 1876;
Daniel, 22 April 1877

Sarah Parker was born in England. She was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by her friend, William Cope Parker, 18 June 1853.

She wanted to join other members of the Church in Utah but her parents would not give their consent. Every day, as she went to the home of her Aunt and Uncle to get milk for her family, she would wear an extra item of clothing until she had enough clothing to take with her to America. She left home without saying anything to her family. She traveled to America on the ship “Windermere,” which left Liverpool, England on 22 February 1854. She was with four members of her mother’s family plus one young man by the name of William Cope Parker. They landed at New Orleans, Louisiana, 23 April 1854. They traveled by steamboat to St. Louis, Missouri, where they were outfitted for the trip across the Plains. They joined the Robert Campbell wagon-train Company. William Cope Parker was the teamster who drove the oxen for their family. The terrain was rough and they had to walk part of the time to lighten the load for the oxen. Once, while crossing a deep gully, Sarah jumped out of the wagon and almost went under the wheel of the wagon. She was rescued by her “sweet William.” They arrived in Salt Lake Valley September 1854.

Sarah married William Cope Parker 13 May 1855 in Salt Lake City, Utah. They spent their first night on a straw ticking mattress in their covered wagon. They became the parents of thirteen children; four died in infancy, two in childhood and one at birth. William and Sarah both worked for a miller, Archibald Gardiner. They ran a mill for the Parker family in Riverdale, Weber, Utah. They bought forty acres of land and raised fruit which was a very successful business so they could buy more land. They also raised tomatoes and sugar beets. Sarah always welcomed guests to her home; Jim Bridger, John Taylor, etc. Sarah acted as a midwife and delivered many of the babies of Riverdale. The Parkers had a large home and after a baby was delivered mother and baby would stay with them to be taken care of until they were strong enough to go back to their own home.

The Parkers were active members of the LDS Church. Sarah was President of the Relief Society in the Ogden 2nd Ward, before the Riverdale Ward was organized. She was an active member of the Riverdale Ward Relief Society. She is mentioned often in the Riverdale Ward R.S. minutes for her donations and help. One note of mention was that Sister Sarah Parker can make corsets and would be glad to help anyone who would like to make their own. Sarah was an excellent homemaker. She died 07 May 1899 in Riverdale at the age of sixty-four. She is buried in the Ogden City Cemetery.

SECTION I
Name: Sarah Bebbington Edgeley Parker
Born: 19 February 1835 Bulkeley, Cheshire, England
Died: 7 May 1899, age 64, Riverdale, Weber, Utah
Pioneer: Robert Campbell Wagon Train pulled by oxen. William Cope Parker drove the wagon.

SECTION II
Biography: Sarah Bebbington Edgeley Parker
Birth Date: 19 February 1835, Bulkeley, Cheshire, England
Died: 7 May 1899, age 64, Riverdale, Weber, Utah
Parents: Father: William Edgeley Mother: Sarah Bebbington Edgeley
Pioneer: 1854 Captain Robert Campbell 6th Wagon Train Company pulled by oxen. Arrived in Salt Lake City, September 1854. William Cope drove the wagon. Crossed the ocean on ship “Wyoming”
Spouse: William Cope Parker
Married: 13 May 1855 in Salt Lake City, Utah
Spouse death: 27 April 1917, Riverdale, Weber, Utah at age 90.

The Children of William Cope Parker and Sarah Edgeley:
1. William Henry Parker born 10 January 1856, West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah. Died 10 January 1856.

2. Sarah Jane Parker born 22 April 1857, West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah. Married Frederick Stimpson, 21 October 1876, Salt Lake City, Endowment House. Died 2 June 1947, St. Anthony, Fremont, Idaho.

3. George William Parker (twin) born 19 February, 1859, Riverdale, Weber, Utah. Died of drowning on 26 May 1863.

4. Mary Parker (twin) born 19 February 1859, Riverdale, Weber, Utah. Died day of birth.

5. Thomas Parker born 31 December 1860, Riverdale, Weber, Utah. Married Jeannette Mitchell in Salt Lake City, Utah. Died 24 May 1941.

6. Elizabeth Parker born 18 February 1863, Riverdale, Weber, Utah. Died age seven months.

7. Joseph Parker, born 20 August 1864, Riverdale, Weber, Utah. Married Minnie May Elmer in Logan, Cache, Utah. Died 27 November 1940, Clinton, Davis, Utah.

8. John Parker born 3 October 1866 in Riverdale, Weber, Utah. Married Laura Birch in Logan, Cache, Utah. Died 6 January 1911 in Roy, Weber, Utah.

9. Richard Parker born 31 July 1866, Riverdale, Weber, Utah, Died age 13 months.

10. Edwin Bebbington Parker born 18 June 1870, Riverdale, Weber, Utah. Married Ella Maud Elmer in Riverdale, Utah. Died 30 May 1958 in Riverdale, Utah.

11. Robert Parker born 8 December 1872, Riverdale, Weber, Utah. Died age five years on 13 November 1877.

12. James William Parker born 2 February 1876, Riverdale, Weber, Utah. Died age 7 weeks on 30 March 1876.

13. Daniel Parker born 22 April 1877, Riverdale, Weber, Utah. Married Pearl Marie Taylor 4 April 1900. Died 20 June 1953.

Sarah was born February 19, 1835 in Bulkley, Cheshire, England. Her father was William Edgeley born August 4, 1813 in Nantwich, Cheshire, England. He died 23 March 1833. Her mother was Sarah Bebbington, born February 19, 1835 in Bulkeley, Cheshire, England, and died May 26, 1841.

Sarah was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by her friend, William Cope Parker on June 18, 1853.

She wanted to join other members of the church in Utah, but her parents would not give their consent, so every day as she went to the home of her aunt and uncle to get milk for her family, she would wear an extra item of clothing, until she had enough clothing to take with her to America. On the final day, she left home without saying anything to her family.

They traveled to America in the ship Windermere which left Liverpool on February 22, 1854. During the crossing, “contrary winds were encountered arising at times in heavy gales”. The journey was said to take eleven weeks, but they were held in the Irish Channel for two weeks because of the storm. After five weeks, a favorable wind sent in and the ship made 1000 miles in four days.

Emigrants on board who were of our family:
Thomas Bebbington, age 52, occupation farmer
Elizabeth Bebbington, age 49
Harriet Bebbington, age 39
Sarah Bebbington, age 19
William Cope Parker, age 26, occupation miller.

When the ship reached New Orleans on April 23, 1854, eleven passengers had to put in quarantine. William Cope Parker was one of those with the disease so he had to remain on an island near St. Louis until he was well.

The rest of the group boarded a steamboat on April 27 and went to St. Louis where they were to be outfitted for the trip across the plains. William was the teamster who drove the oxen for their family.

They crossed the plains with six oxen and two cows in the Robert Campbell wagon train. The terrain was very rough so they had to walk part of the time to lighten the load for the oxen.

Once while crossing a deep gully, Sarah jumped out of the wagon and almost went under the wheel of the wagon. She was rescued by her sweet William.

William and Sarah were married on May 13, 1855, in Salt Lake City. They were sealed in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City on August 29, 1863. When they were first married, William only had $5.00. With that, they bought ticking for a mattress and filled it with straw and they slept in their covered wagon.

When William told his employer, Archibald Gardiner, that he was married, his employer raised his wages and gave them a room to sleep in. He also hired Sarah to be a helper for his wife.

Their first child was born at the Gardiners and died of prematurity. The second child, Sarah Jane, was born on the banks of the Jordan River in a covered wagon in an area now known as West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah. This was probably because all the families were leaving because of the threat of Johnston’s Army.

Johnston’s Army was a threat to the colonists of northern Utah, so John Taylor hired her husband to take his millstones from Riverdale to Utah County where he ground wheat for those who went south. After the threat of trouble was over, the Parker family took the millstones back to Riverdale and built a home and ran the flour mill. Her father, later, became the owner of the mill.

In 1870, after they had run the mill for a while, they bought 40 acres of land and the mill was sold. They bought land to raise fruit which was a very successful business and they eventually ran 70 acres of land. They also raised tomatoes until the sugar factories made it profitable to raise sugar beets. They shipped large amounts of fruit on the railroad.

Sarah always welcomed guests to her home. Jim Bridger, a famous trapper was a frequent visitor to their home and became a good friend of the Parkers. John Taylor was a frequent visitor in their home. He especially liked the homemade beer that Sarah made from roots of plants that grew wild in the area. Sarah was an excellent homemaker.

Her only daughter, Sarah Jane, told of John Taylor, a future president of the Church, visiting their home and holding her on his lap and singing A Poor Wayfaring Man of Grief to her. He told her that the Prophet Joseph Smith had asked him to sing that song to him while he was in Liberty Jail just before he was murdered by the mobs. He would also show her the watch that had saved his life because it was in his pocket when the bullets had hit his watch. She could see the dent in it’s cover made by the bullet.

Sarah acted as a midwife and delivered many of the babies of Riverdale. Parkers had a large home and after a baby was delivered, mother and baby would stay there to be taken care of until they were strong enough to go back to their own home.

The Parkers were active members of the LDS Church. Sarah was president of the Relief Society in the Ogden 2nd Ward, before the Riverdale Ward was organized. William was Sunday School Superintendent for 30 years and Sarah was an active member of the Riverdale Ward Relief Society. She is mentioned often in the Riverdale Ward Relief Society Minutes, for her donations and help. One note of mention was, “--we should make more things for ourselves instead of buying from the stores. Sister Parker can make corsets and would be glad to help anyone who would like to make their own. The young girls of the ward can braid straw to make stays for them.”

Sarah died 7 May 1899 in Riverdale at age 64 and is buried in the Ogden City Cemetery.
Submitted by Margaret S. Pelton, 847 So. 150 W, Orem, Utah 84058

SARAH BEBBINGTON EDGELY PARKER
Sarah was born on February 19th, 1835 in Bulkely, Chestershire, England, a daughter of William Edgely and Sarah Bebbington. Her mother died when she was young and her grandmother raised her. She was well informed and a great reader.

She was baptized into the church by William Cope Parker. She sailed from England on the ship called the William Cur, in February, 1954 with an uncle and two aunts. They were on board ship for eleven weeks. Although they were just nine weeks sailing being held in the Irish Channel on account of a storm. They landed in New Orleans. They then set sail up the Mississippi River to St. Louis. The cholera being very bad and so many dying, they were held at St. Louis, a quarantine island. They were put on another boat landing at Kansas City, Missouri. They landed in the woods and stayed there for a month waiting for wagons. They set out for the west with ox teams. Six oxen and two cows in the Captain Robert Campbell Company.

The roads being very rough the saints walked over the worst places. Once while crossing a deep gully Sarah jumped out falling almost beneath the wheel, but was saved from being crushed by her sweetheart William Cope Parker.

She drove her uncle’s oxen while he was sick. After walking most of the way across the plains she arrived in Salt Lake City, on October 28th, 1854.

She married William Cope Parker on May 13th, 1855, who was receiving $12.00 a month as a helper in a flour mill in Riverdale. When he told his employer he was married his employer raised his wages and let them have a room to live in. Also paying Sarah for helping his wife. Their furniture was made by William. When married he had but $5.00, which they paid for a tick and filled it with straw. They then slept in a wagon.

They lived at West Jordon for three years, then moved to Riverdale and resided there until her death on May 7th, 1899.

They had thirteen children. Sarah was President of the 2nd Ward Relief Society of Ogden before the Riverdale Ward was organized. She was in the move south in 1858 (Johnsons Army). Also in the grasshopper siege while living at Jordan.
Submitted by Irene D. Parker, February 2001, 3875 Madison Avenue, Ogden, Utah 84403

Joseph Parker and Minnie May ElmerJoAnn’ Stagges great grandparents. Joseph is the younger brother of Sarah Jane Parker, born 25 April 1857. Joseph and Sarah Jane are the Children of William Cope Parker and Sarah Bebbington Edgeley. William and Sarah were family friends of future prophet and president of the Church, John Taylor who frequently visited their home. Their second child, daughter, Sarah Jane, told of John Taylor visiting their home and holding her on his lap and singing A Poor Wayfaring Man of Grief to her. He told her that the Prophet Joseph Smith had asked him to sing that song to him while he was in Carthage Jail just before he was murdered by the mobs. He would also show her the watch that had saved his life because it was in his pocket when a bullet had hit his watch. She could see the dent in its cover made by the bullet.
Sarah Jane, the teller of this story is JoAnn’s great grand aunt.


Pioneer Immigrants to Utah Territory
Page: 001949
Name: Sarah Bebbington Parker
Gender: female
Birth Date: 19 February 1835 (illeg.)
Birth Place: Bulkeley, Cheshire, England
Parent1: William Edgeley
Parent2: Sarah Bebbington
Spouse: William Cope Parker
Marriage Date: 13 May 1855
Marriage Place: Salt Lake City, Utah
Departure Date: 14 July 1854
Departure Place: Kansas City, Missouri
Travel Company: William Cope Parker, Thomas Bebbington, Harriet Bebbington, Elizabeth Pass Bebbington
Party: Captain Robert L. Campbell
Arrival Date: 28 October 1854
Arrival Place: Salt Lake City
Religion: LDS
Place Settled: West Jordan, Riverdale
Death Date: 07 May 1899
Death Place, Riverdale, Weber, Utah
Burial Place: Ogden City Cemetery
Source: Christening date from Malpas parish records. Marriage date from Sealing records EH 29 August 1863. Death date from Tombstone, Ogden City Cemetery
Comments: Sailed from Liverpool 22 February 1854 on the ship Windermere, arrived at New Orleans
Sub Name: Vance Parker
Sub Date: 20 August 1990
found on ancestry.com


Utah Deaths and Burials, 1888-1946 for Sarah Parker
Name: Sarah Parker
Gender: Female
Burial Date:
Burial Place:
Death Date: 07 May 1899
Death Place: Riverdale
Age: 64
Birth Date: 1835
Birthplace:
Occupation: House Wife
Race:
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name:
Father's Name:
Father's Birthplace:
Mother's Name:
Mother's Birthplace:
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: B58033-5
System Origin: Utah-EASy
Source Film Number: 497706
Reference Number: 28
found on familysearch.org

out-of-wedlock daughter of William Edgeley and Sarah Bebbington
found on lds.org/churchhistory      Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel (1847-1868)


SOURCES: From Riverdale Ward Records FHS film 026,452: Born 19 Feb 1835 Baptized June 1853 by Wm. C. Parker Confirmed June 1853 by James Dulton CHRISTENING: Malpas Parish Records, Researched by Mabs Turner. FAMILY STORIES: It has always been told in the family that William Cope Parker and Sarah Bebbington met on the trail coming to Utah. He was supposed to have been hired by Sarah's father to help drive the wagon and that's how he and Sarah met. Searching the records, we found that William and Sarah were from the same town in England and that he baptized her before they immigrated. They came to the US on the same ship, landing in New Orleans. Sarah did not travel with her father, but with her uncle, Thomas Bebbington, and his wife, Elizabeth Pass, and his sister Harriet Bebbington, who was unmarried at the time. Thomas and Elizabeth were not members of the church at the time. It would seem likely that arrangements had been made prior to immigration for William to help the Bebbington family on the trail. Sarah and William married about a year after they arrived in the Valley. They settled for a brief time in West Jordan where William worked at the mill there. Their first child was born and died there. Sarah was the only surviving child of Sarah Bebbington. Many Parker descendants insist on giving her the name Sarah Edgely. She always gave the name of her father as William Edgely when asked who her father was, however, her mother was never married. Sarah always used the name Bebbington before marriage and on records requiring her maiden name. Example: her emigration record shows her as Sarah Bebbington. Once in a while the name Edgeley appears on church records, but this was usually when her father is listed also. BIOGRAPHY: Sarah Bebbington Parker [From a handwritten paper probably by William Cope Parker found in the effects of Charles Cope Parker] * * * * * Sarah Bebbington Edgely Parker. Born Feb. 19, 1835 in Bulkely Chestershire England. Daughter of William Edgely and Sarah Bebbington. Her mother died when she was young and her grandmother raised her. She had a common education. She was well informed and a great reader. She was baptized into the Church by W. C. Parker. Sailed from England on ship called Wm. Cur Feb. 1854 with Uncle and two Aunts. [Immigration records show she came on the same ship as William Cope Parker with her Uncle Thomas Bebbington, his wife Elizabeth Pass Bebbington, and her Aunt Harriett Bebbington, sister to Thomas.] They were on board ship eleven weeks. Although they were just nine weeks sailing being held in Irish Channel on account of a storm. They landed in new Orleans. They then set sail up the Mississippi River to St. Louis. The Cholera being very bad and so many dying they were held at St. Louis a quarantine Island afterward. Being put on another boat landing at Kansas City, Missouri. They were landed in the woods and stayed for a month waiting for wagons. Set out for the West with Ox teams, six oxens and two cows in Captain Robert Campbell's Company. The roads being very rough the Saints walked over the worst places. Once while crossing a deep gully Sarah jumped out falling almost beneath the wheel, but was saved from being crushed by her Sweetheart William C. Parker. She drove her Uncle's Oxen while he was sick. After walking most of the way across the Plains she arrived in Salt Lake City Oct. 28, 1854. She married William C. Parker May 13, 1855, who was receiving $12 a month as helper in a flour mill. When he told his employer [Archibald Gardner of Gardner's Mill claim] he was married he raised his wages and let them have a room to live in. Also paying Sarah for helping his wife. All the furniture they had was made by him (William). When married he had but $5, which they paid for a tick and filled it with straw. They then slept in a wagon. They lived at West Jordan three years. Then moved to Riverdale residing there till her death May 7, 1899. She had thirteen children, five of whom are living. She was President of the 2nd Ward Relief Society of Ogden before Riverdale Ward was organized. She was in the move South in 1858. Also in the Grasshopper seige while living at Jordan 1853(5)? ***** Charles Cope Parker told this story: William Cope ran the mill in Riverdale for John Taylor. One day John Taylor came to inspect the Mill. After the inspection, William Cope invited him to have dinner with them. When they went in to dinner, the meal was sitting on the table, but the potatoes and the rest of the food were not cooked. When William asked Sarah why the food was not cooked, she told showed him the wood pile and said, "When the wood is cut, I'll cook the food." [MLP Note: Wouldn't you love to have been there to see the expression on William's face. Bet he didn't forget to cut the firewood after that! Guess this also shows that Sarah had an independent spirit!] Found on FamilySearch.org

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