Sunday, July 29, 2012

JOHN ELMER 1776-1871

[Ancestral Link: Lura Minnie Parker (Stagge), daughter of Minnie May Elmer (Parker), daughter of Mark Alfred Elmer, son of William Elmer, son of John Elmer.]


Jerusa Kibbe Elmer - third wife of John Elmer






Burial: Payson City Cemetery, Payson, Utah County, Utah, USA

Find A Grave Memorial# 15170937
found on findagrave.com



JOHN ELMER, SR.

SKETCH OF THE LIFE OF JOHN ELMER
BY HANNAH E. ELMER
John Elmer was the son of William Elmer and Mary Kibbe, born 22 September 1776 or 1778 in Somers, Tolland, Connecticut. He was a man of large stature and great strength; he measured six feet tall, was one of substantial and reliable citizens, thought not much in public affairs; a man of genial temperament and pleasant humor, good to the poor, honest, upright and sympathetic. He was reared a farmer and continued to cultivate the soil during his life. On leisure days he would sit and split shingles and shave them. He was noted as being one of the best shingle makers in his native state as well as Utah. He made the first ones in Utah as there were no machines and they brought a good price. Being one of the first settlers, he endured many privations and hardships. The country was uninhabited, except for the Indians, and it took a long time to gain an influence over them, enough to let the whites settle among them. Many lost their lives, victims of the savages.

He had no enemies. Beloved by all, he was a sincere Christian, a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. A kind affectionate father and devoted husband, and up to the last hour of consciousness on earth, he maintained that calm serenity and abiding confidence in his faith and died in full belief of a glorious resurrection. Although 92 years when he died, his intellect was bright, he could converse on any subject.

He married Sarah (Polly or Sally) Peak(e) (Peaque). They had five sons and four daughters. In the spring of 1838, they started west by horse team. They stopped to rest at Oerom, Ohio, where his wife and eldest son, Samuel, took typhoid and died. In the following spring, he married the widow of Semore Bronson (Burnsen), who had three small children. They stayed in Illinois until 1843, then sold out and moved to Lee County, Iowa, where they took up a farm, later moved to Council Bluffs. Here he sent his son, William and wife, Hannah, back for his two daughters, who had remained in the east. In the spring of 1852, they all crossed the plains, arriving in Great Salt Lake Valley 3 October 1852. He later settled in Payson, where he died 28 February 1870.

Priesthood Record of John Elmer. Baptized July 1831 by Hazen Eldridge. Confirmed July 1831 by Abram Butterfield. Ordained High Priest 1848 by William Shaw. Endowed 30 March 1852 at Winter Quarters.
The above was submitted to the Daughters of Utah Pioneers by Rhoda L. Stevens on September 26, 1978.

JOHN AND SARAH PEAK ELMER
John Elmer and his wife were interested in living a good Christian life, and trying to understand the scriptures.

They made it a habit to study the Bible. They read and discussed it with friends and neighbors.

He knew Apostles, Prophets, and Evangelists were in the former Church, and thought if the true Church was on the earth, there would still exist the same Authority of the Priesthood.

Some five years prior to the revelation given to Joseph Smith, John Elmer’s family and friends were very much concerned in religious problems.

One day while sitting on the porch of their home conversing on the subject with neighbors, an old person came up.

He didn’t tell his name, but joined in the discussion. Great Great Grandfather was a habitual tobacco user; he was chewing tobacco all the while they were talking. This seemed to annoy the visitor.

He arose and stood directly in front of John, handed him a card and said “On this date the servants of the Lord will come to you and tell you of the true Church and the laws you must live to have the blessings of health.”

He left John holding the card and walked away. In their excitement they didn’t see which way he went, and discovered he was nowhere in sight.

(So we think he was one of the three Nephites or John of old).

The first Elders sent out by the Prophet called at the home of John Elmer, in the New England States, stated their business and talked on the first principles of the Gospel; Faith, Repentance, and Baptism, The Godhead, and concluded with the word of Wisdom.

John was reminded of the card that was given to him by the old gentleman. On the card was printed the exact date the Elders taught them the laws and Principles of the Gospel.

He and his wife were baptized the next day.

They were our first ancestors to join the Church that we have records of.

This story was told by Ira Bartlett Elmer; to his children.

It came to me through my sister; Mrs. Irean Alvey Heaps.
The above was submitted to the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers by Great Great Granddaughter, Mildred Alvey Roberts


BIOGRAPHY OF JOHN ELMER, SR. “Pioneer 1852”
John Elmer Sr., son of William Elmer, Jr. and Mary Kibbe, was born 22 September 1776, Somers, Tolland, Connecticut. He died 11 February 1871 in Payson, Utah county, Utah, buried in Payson City Cemetery.

He married Sarah (Sally) Peake, daughter of Lemuel Peak; she was born 9 July 1784 at Pomfret, Woodstock, Vermont, she died 1838 at Indiana.

They had the following children:

Trypena, born 1802, Norwich Windsor County, Vermont. Married 1st Peter John Chamberlan;

Cynthia, born 1804 Vermont. Married James Sweat;

Samuel Fiefield, born 18-5-6, Vermont, married lst Sarah McDonald and 2nd Sarah Bennett;

Wealthy, born 1808, Vermont, married 1st David Elmer, 2nd Joseph Depew;

John Jr., born 1810, Underhill, Chittendon, Vermont, married 1st Esther York, 2nd, Lucy Almeda Rich;

Sarah (Sally) born 20 September 1813, Lower Canada, married 1st. Luther Sweat, 2nd, John Loveless;

Hiram King, born 4 June 1816 Norwitch, Windsor, Vermont, died 30 September 1909, Payson, Utah, married 1st Lucina Elmer, 2nd, Mary Huffman;

William born 16 September 1820 Norwitch, Windsor, Vermont, married Hannah Polina Child, 2nd, Mary Ann Gheen;

Ira Bartlett, born 2 August 1823 Norwitch, Windsor, Vermont, married 1st. Eveline E. Wright 2nd, Sarah Slenah Leicht.
From a Diary of William Elmer in the Archive.

John Elmer was a man of large stature and great physical strength, genial temperament and pleasant humor, honest, upright and sympathetic.

He was a farmer and also became noted as the best shingle maker in his native State. And later of the State of Utah, being the first shingle maker in Utah.

John Elmer arrived in the Salt Lake Valley, October 3, 1852, after a hard trip across the plains. He moved to Payson, Utah county, Utah, where he did much to help settle that valley, which was then inhabited by the Indians. He died at the age of 92 years at Payson and was buried in the Payson City Cemetery. His wife, Sarah (Sally) Peake Elmer, died in Indiana. He married 2nd Hariet Gould Brunson, widow of Seymour Brunson, by whom he had two children, Lucretia Elmer and Jerusha Kibbe, who married John Spencer. John Elmer was a shoemaker by trade.
The above was submitted to the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers by May Haskell Elmer Beddoes, His Great Granddaughter-in-law.

SKETCH OF THE LIFE OF JOHN ELMER
BY HANNAH E. ELMER
Essentially the same as the first in this biography except the following was added to the end:

Other notes of history: Moved to Adams County, Illinois late fall of 1838. After reaching Illinois, John and his sons began to build a cabin to live in. As soon as the walls were up and a roof on, father and sons went to work, as their supplies were running low. While away, the cabin, with all their possessions, burned to the ground. They managed to find enough work to buy more clothes and live through the winter. After John married widow Bronson, they all went to live at her house.

The following children were born to John Elmer and Sarah Peake:

1. Trypenia born 27 April, 1802 Norwich, Orange County, Vermont
2. Cynthia born 1804
3. Samuel Fifield born 1806
4. Weltha born 1808
5. John, Jr. born 1810 Underhill Windsor County
6. Sally (Sarah) born 20 September 1814 Lower Canada
7. Hiram King born 4 June 1816 Norwich Orange County Vermont
8. William born 16 September 1820
9. Ira Bartlett born 2 August 1823
The above was submitted to the Daughters of Utah Pioneers by LaVern M. Hamilton, 10 South Hidden Valley Road, P.O. Box 681, Leeds, Utah, on 9 Jan 1984.NOTES
1. John and his family left Vermont and headed west in 1838.

2. They stayed in Ohio for a short while, where Sally Peake Elmer and a son John got typhoid and died. They also lost their house and all their possessions from a fire.

3. John married again to a Semore Bronson, a widow with 3 children. They soon moved to Illinois and lived there until 1843 and then moved to Iowa.

4. They moved on to Utah in the spring of 1852, and settled in Payson, Utah.

5. He was 92 yrs old when he died. ancestry.com

History of John Elmer
Our first Elmer ancestor to hear the Latter-day Saint gospel message taught by three missionaries sent to Vermont, were John Elmer and his wife Sally Peake. John Elmer was born 22 September 1776 in Norwich, Orange, Vermont. His parents were William Elmer and Mary Kibbe. They never heard the gospel. John’s wife Sally Peake was born 9 July 1784, Pomfret, Woodstock, Vermont. They had nine children, four girls and five boys. Sally died in 1838 in Indiana.

The story of the conversion to the gospel of John Elmer and Sally Peake was written by Frank William Elmer of Mesa, Arizona. It was told to him by his grandmother Sarah Leicht, wife of Ira Bartlett Elmer, son of John and Sally.

John and wife were interested in living a good Christian life, trying to understanding the scriptures. They made a habit to study the Bible. They read and discussed it with friends, neighbors and relatives.

He knew apostles, prophets, and evangelists were in the former day church and thought if the true church was on the earth, there would still exist the same authority of the Priesthood.

One day while visiting with neighbors, who had come to visit them, they were discussing scriptures and the different faiths near them. They were not satisfied with the doctrines set forth by some of their ministers. During this discussion a stranger joined the group and listened.

John was a habitual tobacco user. He was chewing all the time while they were talking. This seemed to annoy the stranger. He stood directly in front of John, handed him a card and said, “On this date the servants of the Lord will come to you and tell you of the true church and the laws you must live to have the blessing of health.” While they were reading the card the man left. No one saw which way he went, he was not heard of by any one else in the neighborhood. It was thought he was one of the Three Nephites or John of Old.

Nearly five years after this incident, the first Elders sent out by the Prophet called at the home of John Elmer. They stated their business and talked on the first principles of the gospel: faith, repentance, and baptism, the Godhead and concluded with the revelation on the Word of Wisdom.

This reminded John of the card that was given him by the old gentleman. On the card was the exact date the missionaries taught them the laws and principles of the gospel.

He and his wife were baptized the next day in July 1831 by Hazen Eldrege and Abram Butterfield. They began preparations immediately to join the saints in Nauvoo.

John Elmer was a timberman; he cut and hewed logs to build their homes. They were comfortable both in the summer and the extremely cold winters of Vermont. When the snow covered the fences, they could travel in their sleighs over them. John floated logs down the river, and was noted as the best shingles maker. He also was a farmer and a shoemaker.

John with some of his children and their families and other relatives journeyed from their homes in Vermont to Illinois. They lived for a time in Adams county. Sally did not live to reach their destination. She died in Indiana in 1838.

He was ordained a High Priest in 1848.

Through persecutions they went to Lee County, Iowa, traveling by team. It was here that his daughter Wealtha died in 1850, leaving her children to her father’s care.

In Nauvoo, John married Harriet Gould Brunson, the widow of Seymour Brunson. Two daughters were born to John and Harriet. Jerusha (who married John Spencer) and Lucretia who was born and died in infancy.

Harriet was a good kind mother to Wealtha’s children. She was very neat and industrious, and an expert with her needle. In her later years she sewed many balls of carpet rags for friends and neighbors. She did so well she could not keep up with the demand.

John Elmer arrived in Utah in 1851 (see note from the church below).

John and family first went to Ogden with his son William. Then he moved to Payson. He did much to settle the valley, inhabited by Indians. He was one of Utah’s first shingle makers, and was noted as the best here as well as in his native state. Here he also made shoes and farmed.

He was a man of large stature and great physical strength, genial temperament, pleasant humor, honest, upright and sympathetic. He lost his eyesight a short time before his death. He died 11 February, 1871 in Payson Utah and was buried in the Payson Cemetery

After his death, Harriet went to Filmore where her two sons Seymour and Louis Brunson lived.

In a history of John Elmer, written by Ora L. Dixon, John was listed as having completed his endowments at Winter Quarters on 6 May 1848. The history also had him arriving in Utah with the “Lyle” Curtis company in 1852. NOTE: there was no Lyle Curtis company. There was a Uriah Curtis company, in which the rest of the Elmer family arrived.

The LDS church, when compiling records of all Utah pioneers discovered that he couldn’t have arrived in Utah in 1852, because he received his endowments in the office of Brigham Young on the 30 March 1852, so he must have already been here.

The following is a note that Bryan Chapman received while communicating our family history data with the church history department (while compiling records of the pioneers):

With regard to John Elmer in the pioneer database:

Although your family information places John Elmer in the 1852 "Lyle" Curtis (probably Uriah Curtis company), stronger evidence more contemporary to the time shows that he came in 1851, not 1852. He and his wife, Harriet, were endowed in Brigham Young's office on 30 March 1852. This is positive proof that he came to Utah in 1851. One might argue that he could have returned to his family that spring after receiving his endowments in Salt Lake. A group of missionaries left Salt Lake on 5 May eastbound, but he was not listed among them. Also his advanced age (73) argues against him doing that. Generally it would take young missionaries traveling at a good pace 6 or more weeks to travel the 1000 miles back to Florence. He would have had little time to rest his stock and resupply for the return trip to Utah. I think the evidence is strong that he came to Utah in 1851 and stayed here to greet the rest of his family who came in the 1852 Curtis company. We see these kind of errors in family biographies frequently. We don't discount family biographies out of hand, but always try to look at primary facts (like endowments, etc.) to see if the biographical statements hold up. In this case, they don't. You may see the record of John Elmer's endowment on 30 March 1852 on FHL film 183393. It is so noted on the IGI. ancestry.com

John Elmer
Conquerors of the West: Stalwart Mormon Pioneers, volume 2
Name: John Elmer
Birth Date: 22 September 1776
Birth Place: Somers, Tolland, Connecticut
Parents: William and Mary Kibbe Elmer
Death Date: 11 February 1871
Death Place: Payson, Utah, Utah
Arrival: 1 October 1852, Uriah Curtis Co.
Spouse: Sarah/Sally P. Peak(e)
Marriage Date: about 1800
Spouse's Birth Date: 09 July 1784
Spouse's Birth Place: Promfret, Windsor, Vermont
Spouse's Death Date: Summer 1838
Spouse's Death Place: Indiana, on the way to Nauvoo
Married 2nd: Harriet Gould Brunson Date: Spring 1839.

John was a timber man who cut and hewed logs to build homes. He floated logs down the river and was known as the best shingle maker. He was also a farmer and shoe maker. He always took time to study the Bible with his family so when the missionaries came in 1836, they were ready to accept the gospel. They started their preparations to join the saints and, in the spring of 1838, they left with others. His wife and their oldest son developed typhoid fever and died in Indiana. The family went on to Adams County, Illinois, where they built a cabin for the winter. John and his sons went out to find work. While they were gone, their cabin and all their possessions burned to the ground. They found work and lived through the winter.

In the spring John remarried and they lived in Harriet 's home. In 1843 they moved to Lee County, Iowa, and later to Council Bluffs, Iowa. They crossed the plains in 1852. John and his family settled in Ogden and later moved to Payson. He remained a farmer but also made shingles and shoes. He was a large man, six feet tall, and of great physical strength due to early life as a lumberman. He had a pleasant temperament and a sense of humor; he was honest and a reliable citizen and member of the church.

He lost his eyesight a short time before his death. He died as a result of teaching some men how to properly fell a tree. The tree fell on him because he couldn't see to get out of the way. He was 95 years old when he died.

Children of 1st wife:

Typhenia, born 27 April 1801, Norwich, Windsor, Vermont.
Cynthia, born 1804, Norwich, Vermont.
Samuel Fifield, born 1805, Norwich, Vermont.
Wealthy, born 1808, Orange, Orange, Vermont.
John, born 1810, Underhill, Chittendon, Vermont.
Salley, born 20 September 1813, Underhill, Vermont.
Hyrum King, born 4 June 1816, Norwich, Windsor, Vermont.
William, born 16 September 1820, Norwich, Windsor, Vermont.
Ira Bartlett, born 2 August 1823, Norwich, Vermont.

Children of 2nd wife:
Jerusha Kibbe, born 10 May 1842.
Lucretia, born Unknown. Died Infant.
Lorna Belnap ancestry.com

Pioneer Details for John Elmer
John G. Smith Company 1851
Pioneer Information:

Evidence from church, newspaper, and genealogical records proves he traveled to Utah in 1851. He appeared on the 1850 Iowa census, enumerated in October 1850. He was on the 1852 Bishop's Report. He received his endowments in Salt Lake in March 1852. These events narrow the window of his travel to Utah to 1851. Other family traditions claim that he came in the 1852 Uriah Curtis company, but that is incorrect. He could have only traveled to Utah in 1851. ancestry.com

About their life

John Elmer was born in Sommers, Tolland County, Connecticut, 22 September 1776, and was raised in the Connecticut and Vermont area. He married Sally Peake about 1801. Their first child was born in 1802 in Norwich, Windsor county, Vermont, and they evidently lived in Rutland, Orange and Windam County, Vermont, into the 1830's.

The family became converted to the LDS Church (Mormon) in the late 1830's and started west to Far West, Missouri. Sally died in Wabash, Indiana, in 1838. After her burial, they moved to Adams County, Illinois and then to Lee County, Iowa where they lived for a time, then joined the main body of the Church at Winter Quarters. John travelled to Utah in 1851 and the family followed in 1852 crossing the plains in a wagon train under the command of Captain Curtis. John lived with Hyrum's family and lived in Provo and Bingham for four years and settled in Payson Utah, in 1857. John died at the age of 95, 11 February 1871, in Payson, Utah, and is buried there with Hyrum's family. ancestry.com

History of John Elmer
John was a timber man who cut and hewed logs to build homes. He floated logs down the river and was known as the best shingle maker. He was also a farmer and shoe maker. He always took time to study the Bible with his family so when the missionaries came in 1836, they were ready to accept the gospel. They started their preparations to join the saints and, in the spring of 1838, they left with others. His wife and their oldest son developed typhoid fever and died in Indiana. The family went on to Adams County, Illinois, where they built a cabin for the winter. John and his sons went out to find work. While they were gone, their cabin and all their possessions burned to the ground. They found work and lived through the winter. In the spring John remarried and they lived in Harriet's home. In 1843 they moved to Lee County, Iowa, and later to Council Bluffs, Iowa. They crossed the plains in 1852. John and his family settled in Ogden and later moved to Payson. He remained a farmer but also made shingles and shoes. He was a large man, six feet tall, and of great physical strength due to early life as a lumberman. He had a pleasant temperament and a sense of humor; he was honest and a reliable citizen and member of the church. He lost his eyesight a short time before his death. He died as a result of teaching some men how to properly fell a tree. The tree fell on him because he couldn't see to get out of the way. He was 95 years old when he died.
BIOGRAPHY:
Conquerors of the West: Stalwart Mormon Pioneers, volume 2

found on ancestry.com 

History of John ElmerView on FamilySearch
Our first Elmer ancestor to hear the Latter Day Saint gospel message taught by three missionaries sent to Vermont, were John Elmer and his wife Sally Peake. John Elmer was born 22 Sept, 1776 in Norwich, Orange, Vermont. His parents were William Elmer and Mary Kibbe. They never heard the gospel. John’s wife Sally Peake was born 9 July 1784, Pomfret, Woodstock, Vermont. They had nine children, four girls and five boys. Sally died in 1838 in Indianna. The story of the conversion to the gospel of John Elmer and Sally Peake was written by Frank William Elmer of Mesa, Arizona. It was told to him by his grandmother Sarah Leicht, wife of Ira Bartlett Elmer, Son of John and Sally. John and wife were interested in living a good Christian life, trying to understanding the scriptures. They made a habit to study the Bible. They read and discussed it with friends, neighbors and realatives. He knew apostles, prophets, and evangelists were in the former day church and thought if the true church was on the earth, there would still exist the same authority of the Priesthood. One day while visiting with neighbors, who had come to visit them, they were discussing scriptures and the different faiths near them. They were not satisfied with the doctrines set forth by some of their ministers. During this discussion a stranger joined the group and listened. John was a habitual tobacco user. He was chewing all the time while they were talking. This seemed to annoy the stranger. He stood directly in front of John, handed him a card and said, “On this date the servants of the Lord will come to you and tell you of the true church and the laws you must live to have the blessing of health.” While they were reading the card the man left. No one saw which way he went, he was not heard of by any one else in the neighborhood. It was thought he was one of the Three Nephites or John of Old. Nearly five years after this incident, the first Elders sent out by the Prophet called at the home of John Elmer. They stated their business and talked on the first principles of the gospel: faith, repentance, and baptism, the Godhead and concluded with the revelation on the Word of Wisdom. This reminded John of the card that was given him by the old gentleman. On the card was the exact date the missionaries taught them the laws and principles of the gospel. He and his wife were baptized the next day in July 1831 by Hazen Eldrege and Abram Butterfield. They began preparations immediately to join the saints in Nauvoo. John Elmer was a timberman; he cut and hewed logs to build their homes. They were comfortable both in the summer and the extremely cold winters of Vermont. When the snow covered the fences, they could travel in their sleighs over them. John floated logs down the river, and was noted as the best shingles maker. He also was a farmer and a shoemaker. John with some of his children and their families and other relatives journeyed from their homes in Vermont to Illinois. They lived for a time in Adams county. Sally did not live to reach their destination. She died in Indiana in 1838. He was ordained a High Priest in 1848. Through persecutions they went to Lee County, Iowa, traveling by team. It was here that his daughter Wealtha died in 1850, leaving her children to her father’s care. In Nauvoo, John married Harriet Gould Brunson, the widow of Seymour Brunson. Two daughters were born to John and Harriet. Jerusha (who married John Spencer) and Lucretia who was born and died in infancy. Harriet was a good kind mother to Wealtha’s children. She was very neat and industrious, and an expert with her needle. In her later years she sewed many balls of carpet rags for friends and neighbors. She did so well she could not keep up with the demand. John Elmer arrived in Utah in 1851 (see note from the church below). John and family first went to Ogden with his son William. Then he moved to Payson. He did much to settle the valley, inhabited by Indians. He was one of Utah’s first shingle makers, and was noted as the best here as well as in his native state. Here he also made shoes and farmed. He was a man of large stature and great physical strength, genial temperament, pleasant humor, honest, upright and sympathetic. He lost his eyesight a short time before his death. He died 11 February, 1871 in Payson Utah and was buried in the Payson Cemetery After his death, Harriet went to Filmore where her two sons Seymour and Louis Brunson lived. In a history of John Elmer, written by Ora L. Dixon, John was listed as having completed his endowments at Winter Quarters on 6 May 1848. The history also had him arriving in Utah with the “Lyle” Curtis company in 1852. NOTE: there was no Lyle Curtis company. There was a Uriah Curtis company, in which the rest of the Elmer family arrived. The LDS church, when compiling records of all Utah pioneers discovered that he couldn’t have arrived in Utah in 1852, because he received his endowments in the office of Brigham Young on the 30 March 1852, so he must have already been here. The following is a note that Bryan Chapman received while communicating our family history data with the church history department (while compiling records of the pioneers): With regard to John Elmer in the pioneer database: Although your family information places John Elmer in the 1852 "Lyle" Curtis (probably Uriah Curtis company), stronger evidence more contemporary to the time shows that he came in 1851, not 1852. He and his wife, Harriet, were endowed in Brigham Young's office on 30 March 1852. This is positive proof that he came to Utah in 1851. One might argue that he could have returned to his family that spring after receiving his endowments in Salt Lake. A group of missionaries left Salt Lake on 5 May eastbound, but he was not listed among them. Also his advanced age (73) argues against him doing that. Generally it would take young missionaries traveling at a good pace 6 or more weeks to travel the 1000 miles back to Florence. He would have had little time to rest his stock and resupply for the return trip to Utah. I think the evidence is strong that he came to Utah in 1851 and stayed here to greet the rest of his family who came in the 1852 Curtis company. We see these kind of errors in family biographies frequently. We don't discount family biographies out of hand, but always try to look at primary facts (like endowments, etc.) to see if the biographical statements hold up. In this case, they don't. You may see the record of John Elmer's endowment on 30 Mar. 1852 on FHL film 183393. It is so noted on the IGI. Found on FamilySearch.orgSKETCH OF THE LIFE OF JOHN ELMER BY HANNAH E ELMER John Elmer was the son of William Elmer and Mary Kibbe, born 22 Sep 1776 or 1778 in Somers, Tolland, Connecticut. He was a man of large stature and great strength; he measured six feet tall, was one of substantial and reliable citizens though not much in public affairs. He was of genial temperament and pleasant humor, good to the poor, honest, upright and sympathetic.

He was reared a farmer and continued to cultivate the soil during his life. On leisure days he would sit and split shingles and shave them. He was noted as being one of the best shingle makers in his native state as well as in Utah. He made the first ones in Utah as there were no machines. They brought a good price.

Being one of the first settlers, he endured may privations and hardships. The country was uninhabited, except for Indians, and it took a long time to gain an influence over them, enough to let the whites settle among them. Many lost their lives, victims of the Indians.

John had no enemies. Beloved by all, he was a sincere Christian, a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. A kind and affectionate father and devoted husband, and up to the last hour of consciousness on earth, he maintained the calm serenity and abiding confidence in his fait and died in full belief of a glorious resurrection. Although 92 years old when he died, his intellect was bright, and he could converse on any subject.

He married Sarah (Polly or Sally) Peake (Peaque) abt 1801. They had five sons and 4 daughters.
In the spring of 1838, they started west by horse team. They stopped to rest at Oerom, Ohio where
his wife Sarah and oldest son Samuel, took typhoid and died.

In fall of 1838 they moved to Adams County Illinois. After reaching Illinois, John and his sons began to build a cabin to live in . As soon as the walls were up and a roof on, father and sons went out to work as their supplies were running low. While away the cabin, with all their possessions burned to the ground. They managed to find enough work to buy more clothes and live through the winter.

In the following spring he married Harriet Gould Bronson or Burnson,, widow of Semore Bronson, who had 3 small children, and went to live at her house.

They stayed in Adams Co. Illinois until about 1843, then sold out and moved to Lee County Iowa, where they took up a farm. They later moved to Council Bluff, Iowa. Here he sent his son William and wife back for his two daughters, who had remained in the east.

In the spring of 1852 they all crossed the plains, arriving in Great Salt Lake valley, 3 Oct 1852. He later
settled in Payson, Utah where he died 28 Feb. 1870.

The Priesthood record of John Elmer is: Baptized July, 1831 by Haxon Eldridge, confirmed July 1831 by Abram Butterfield, Ordained a High Priest by William Shaw in 1848. He was endowed 30 Mar, 1852 at Winter Quarters. FOUND ON FAMILYSEARCH.ORG


Son Hyrum King Elmer
Elmer Hiram E, Mary H, Lucina, Hiram J, John, Payson, Utah Cemetery, Plot: 19 18 4.
Headstones Reads: [Front from D Street] In Memory of Hiram Elmer born in Orange County Vermont, June 4, 1816. Died September 30. 1909 [Right side] In Memory of Mary H. wife of Hiram Elmer Born in state of Ohio. April 16. 1829. Died December 10. 1902. [Base] Lo[?] Where this silent marble weeps. A friend, A wife, A mother sleeps A heart with in whose scared cell The peaceful virtues loved to dwell. [Back Side] In Memory of Lucina Elmer Born September 20, 1867. Died October 8, 1869 ~~~~~~~~~~~ Hiram J. Elmer Born April 1, 1871 Died August 6, 1871 [Left Side] In Memory of John Elmer Born in Orange County Vermont September 22, 1776 Died February 11, 1871 An honest man is the noblest work of God.

Hyrum Elmer Life Sketch
"Hyrum was a river-runner. He would go up the river and cut logs, which were then bound together in a raft and floated down river to their destination. His father was a shingle maker.
Hyrum grew up hearing and reading the Bible. He was reading when the missionaries came with the gospel in 1835 and was soon baptized, as was his family. He lived in Vermont for 22 years and after his conversion, he went to Massachusetts to work to earn the money for his parents and family to join the saints.

After two years, he went home, got his parents and left for Missouri. His mother and brother died in Indiana but the rest of the family gradually made their way west. Upon their arrival they made their home near Bingham Canyon in Wight's Fort. Hyrum made shingles and ran Bishop Hunter's cattle and dairy.

In the spring of 1857, Hyrum moved his family to Payson where they remained. He helped build up the community, where he was well liked and respected. Besides his own children, he and his wife took five children into their home to raise. He lived to be 93 years old."

Excerpt taken from the book "Conquerers of the West: Stalwart Mormon Pioneers, Volume II", Edited by Florence C. Youngberg, Compiled by The National Society for Sons of Utah Pioneers" - 1998 - 700 pages.



Ira Bartlett Elmer

Ira Bartlett Elmer with one of his many wives
Thatcher Cemetery, Thatcher, Graham County, Arizona, Plot: 4.8



John Elmer was listed as recipient of Perpetual Emigrating Fund


NAME INDEX Compiled by Maurine Carr Ward
NAMES of PERSONS AND SURETIES indebted to the PERPETUAL EMIGRATING FUND COMPANY FROM 1850 TO 1877 INCLUSIVE
Printed at the Star Book and Job Printing Office, Salt Lake City 1877


Evidence from church, newspaper, and genealogical records proves he traveled to Utah in 1851. He appeared on the 1850 Iowa census, enumerated in Oct. 1850. He was on the 1852 Bishop's Report. He received his endowments in Salt Lake in March 1852. These events narrow the window of his travel to Utah to 1851. Other family traditions claim that he came in the 1852 Uriah Curtis company, but that is incorrect. He could have only traveled to Utah in 1851.
found on lds.org/churchhistory/                    Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel (1847-1868)


Complete story of John ElmerView on FamilySearch
Life Story of John Elmer: John Elmer is my great, great, great grandfather on my mother’s father’s side. He was my grandfather’s first ancestor to join the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. He and his family crossed the plains to arrive in the Salt Lake Valley. John Elmer was born on 22 SEP 1776, born to William Elmer Jr. and Mary Kibbe, in Orange County, Vermont. Nothing is known of his childhood except that he learned to become a good farmer and lumberman. He was married at the age of 25 to Sarah Peake, and they began to raise a family, eventually having 9 children- five sons and four daughters. He was noted to be a tall and genial man, and knew how to make shoes, farm, and was an expert shingle maker and logger. He made his family a very comfortable log home in which they were comfortable during the cold Vermont winters. He was a very tall man at 6 feet tall, and was recorded as having “great physical strength due to early life as a lumberman.” He was also a habitual tobacco user until the day of his baptism. He was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in July of 1831 when he was 55 years old. The story of his conversion is miraculous. It is told by several of his posterity that John loved to read and study the Bible, and he believed in the Savior and the priesthood. He and his wife would often sit and talk about the gospel of Christ, and often would discuss these things with their neighbors and friends. One day, while they were discussing Christ and His teachings, an elderly gentleman arrived at their home and joined the discussion. He seemed irritated at John’s tobacco use, but inquired about John’s belief in prophets, and John responded that he believed there should be prophets in the current day. The man informed him that he was correct in his thinking, and handed him a small card, on which was written a date. He informed John and his wife that some men would come on that date to preach the true gospel and the plan of salvation to them. They studied the card intently, and when they looked up to ask the man how they would know to recognize these men that were to teach them, and the man was nowhere to be found. Nearly 5 years later the first missionaries were sent by Joseph Smith to Vermont to his hometown. The missionaries began preaching the gospel and discussing the plan of salvation. John was reminded by his wife about the small card they had kept in a safe place –inside a trunk. They retrieved the card, and the date on the card matched that day exactly. John and his wife received the missionaries and their message with gladness, and asked the missionaries to baptize them – his history reports that, despite his love for chewing tobacco, he never used it again. It is family tradition that John and Sarah believed the mysterious gentleman who handed them the card was one of the Three Nephites. Both John and his wife Sarah were baptized the following day, and remained faithful to the end of their lives. Sarah’s life ended only 7 years later as the family was making their way toward Nauvoo, Illinois. She and their oldest son, Samuel, died of Typhoid in 1838 while traveling through Indiana. Samuel was 32 years old and left behind his wife, also named Sarah. John and the rest of his family settled for a time in Adams County, Illinois and built a small cabin. As soon as the roof was on, John and his able sons went out in search for work, as they were out of money. While they were gone their cabin caught fire and burned down with all their possessions. They earned enough money to purchase some clothing and begin rebuilding in time for the winter. Soon John met and fell in love with a widow who lived in Nauvoo – her name was Harriet Gould Brunson. She was a young widow who had recently arrived with her husband and 5 children to Nauvoo, only to have her husband pass away in 1840. Her late husband Seymour Brunson, a good friend of the prophet Joseph, had been a colonel in the Nauvoo Legion due to a decorated military career having served with honors in the war of 1812, and was a member of the High Council. It was at Seymour’s funeral on AUG 15, 1840, where the Joseph Smith gave a discourse on the doctrine of baptism for the dead for the first time. Harriet had been baptized by Hyrum Smith in 1831, which was the same year John and his wife Sarah had been baptized. John and Harriet were married on 24 March 1841 and his family moved in to Harriet’s home in Nauvoo. John and Harriet had a baby girl while they lived there, and named her Jerusha. Two years later John and Harriet moved to Council Bluffs, Iowa where they settled a small farm. They had another daughter, Lucretia in 1845. John’s daughter Wealthy, a widow herself, died at Council Bluffs, leaving behind her three sons and daughter in 1850. John and Harriet took Wealthy’s children in and Harriet was a good mother to them. In 1851 John and Harriet joined the Mormon Pioneers traveling west. They likely traveled with the John G. Smith Company. In 1852 there are records showing John received his endowment in Brigham Young’s office in Salt Lake City, UT. John was listed as one of the “Stalwart Mormon Pioneers” in that volume. He and Harriet moved to Ogden, UT for a short time, and then later moved to Payson, UT where they settled permanently until John’s death at about age 94. John was hailed as the best shingle maker in UT, and often described as a man of “pleasant temperament and a sense of humor; he was honest and a reliable citizen and member of the church.” John continued to work and teach logging and felling trees into his old age. It was said that even in his nineties his intellect was very bright and he could still converse on any subject. At about age 93 or 94 he lost his eyesight, but this did not deter him from continuing to stay active and involved with those around him. At about age 95 – on 11 Feb 1871- he was out teaching some younger men how to properly fell a tree, and due to his poor vision he did not see the tree falling, so he was unable to get out of the way in time. The tree accidentally fell on him, killing him. He was buried in the Payson Cemetery. Found on FamilySearch.org 


1 comment:

  1. My husband, Kim, is a descendant of Ira Bartlett Elmer. We feel there is and error with one of the pictures you have posted. The one depicting Ira Bartlett Elmer with white hair is the same picture we have in our Davies Family Books and it is not Ira Bartlett Elmer but John William Davies who married Sarah Ellen McInelly. (Sarah Ellen is a descendant of Ira B. Elmer). Thank you for all the work you have done. Sincerely, Cynthia Davies

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